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Biosecurity News
16 April 2015
QFF - Australian home gardeners experience
16 April 2015
Its well-known the Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) is a significant threat to New Zealand’s horticultural industry. However, it would also be a huge problem for home and hobby gardeners who enjoy...
QFF - Australian home gardeners experience
16 April 2015

Its well-known the Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) is a significant threat to New Zealand’s horticultural industry. However, it would also be a huge problem for home and hobby gardeners who enjoy growing fruit for their own use.

Female QFFs lay eggs under the skin of ripening fruit. These eggs hatch into white maggots that live and feed in the fruit for 7-12 days causing the fruit to rot from the inside.

Home gardeners in Australia have been living with the fruit fly for many years. In most Australian states and territories, fruit fly control is now the responsibility of every backyard gardener. These ongoing controls can include sanitisation, spraying, baiting, trapping and covering plants and are costly in terms of time, money and effort.

The number of websites and Youtube clips dedicated to teaching backyard growers’ about best-practice management and controlling fruit fly is indicative of the problem it has become in Australia.

  • Click here to watch a short Youtube clip by a gardener showing a QFF laying eggs into a cucumber and the resulting damage to fruit.
  • Click here to see images of QFF affected fruit.

The QFF is described as the bane of Australian gardeners’ and growers’ lives and it’s in everyone’s best interest to keep it out of New Zealand.

Also see: www.preventfruitfly.com.au which is sponsored by the National Fruit Fly Strategy.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications

Biosecurity News
16 April 2015
Queensland fruit fly response - residents in for the long haul
16 April 2015
MPI confirmed last week the residents in the Grey Lynn controlled area are in for the long haul as the QFF response is likely to continue until at least November. To date, 14 adult flies have been...
Queensland fruit fly response - residents in for the long haul
16 April 2015

MPI confirmed last week the residents in the Grey Lynn controlled area are in for the long haul as the QFF response is likely to continue until at least November.

To date, 14 adult flies have been located and the last find was over a month ago on 6 March. The last detection of larvae in fruit collected from the affected area was on 13 March. While this is good news, it is still too early to confirm the flies are gone for good.

Response activities over winter
MPI expects to stop the baiting treatments in the Controlled Area sometime around early June, as fruit flies ‘hibernate’ during winter, and resume in the springtime to ensure all flies are eradicated. The surveillance traps will remain in place during winter, but will be checked less frequently.

During this time the controls on the movement of fruit and vegetables outside of the Controlled Area will continue to ensure any surviving flies are not spread from the area. MPI recently made it easier to comply with the rules by allowing customers to purchase fruit and vegetables at certain MPI-approved retailers within the Controlled Area that can be taken outside of the Controlled Area.

To keep up to date with information on the MPI website click here.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications

Company Notices
2 April 2015
Barry ONeil appointed on HortNZ Board
2 April 2015
KVH Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, has recently been appointed to the HortNZ Board as an Independent Director.  Barry has extensive biosecurity governance experience, including membership...
Barry ONeil appointed on HortNZ Board
2 April 2015

KVH Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, has recently been appointed to the HortNZ Board as an Independent Director.  Barry has extensive biosecurity governance experience, including membership of Australia’s National Biosecurity Committee and directorship of the New Zealand Bio-Protection Core and SCION.
 

Company Notices
2 April 2015
Vacancy: bin inspector for Franklin region
2 April 2015
KVH is looking for a person to inspect harvest bins at a Pukekohe packhouse to ensure they are free of leaf/plant material before they are delivered to Exclusion region orchards. Work is part-time...
Vacancy: bin inspector for Franklin region
2 April 2015

KVH is looking for a person to inspect harvest bins at a Pukekohe packhouse to ensure they are free of leaf/plant material before they are delivered to Exclusion region orchards.

Work is part-time and on an on-call basis throughout April and May.

For further details phone Karyn Lowry on 027 227 1157 or email karyn.lowry@kvh.org.nz

Grower News
2 April 2015
Reporting unusual symptoms
2 April 2015
KVH has recently received several reports of unusual symptoms on kiwifruit orchards by proactive growers. These have been followed up with site visits and diagnostic testing to determine the cause....
Reporting unusual symptoms
2 April 2015

KVH has recently received several reports of unusual symptoms on kiwifruit orchards by proactive growers. These have been followed up with site visits and diagnostic testing to determine the cause. Fortunately these investigations have not found any new pathogens or biosecurity threats.

If a new pathogen were to enter New Zealand and affect our industry, swift action would give the best chance of minimising impacts to the industry.

All growers are encouraged to report any unusual symptoms to either KVH (0800 665 825) or their postharvest technical representative.
 

Biosecurity News
2 April 2015
Queensland Fruit Fly update - revised movement controls
2 April 2015
This week MPI announced changes to the movement controls for fruit and vegetables in the QFF Controlled Area in Grey Lynn. These changes will enable customers to purchase fruit and vegetables from...
Queensland Fruit Fly update - revised movement controls
2 April 2015

This week MPI announced changes to the movement controls for fruit and vegetables in the QFF Controlled Area in Grey Lynn.

These changes will enable customers to purchase fruit and vegetables from MPI-Approved Retailers within the Controlled Area that they can take outside of the Controlled Area.

Precautions are required by both MPI-Approved Retailers and customers when purchasing and selling fresh produce to avoid potentially spreading Queensland fruit fly.

These precautions include:

  • Retailers sourcing all fruit and vegetables for sale from outside the Controlled Area.
  • Protecting the produce from exposure to Queensland fruit fly during transit to stores.
  • Some retailers may also be required to cover fruit and vegetables in their store with a fruit fly resistant mesh so that fruit flies cannot lay eggs on the produce.
  • Retailers sealing the fresh produce in a plastic bag so customers are able to safely move it out of the Controlled Area.
  • Customers may not remove the fruit from the plastic bag until it is outside the Controlled Area.
  • Customers to keep their receipt as proof of purchase when they move the produce out of the Controlled Area.

People will be able to identify approved retailers in the Controlled Area as they will display this MPI poster.

A list of approved retailers is also available on MPI’s website here.




 

Biosecurity News
2 April 2015
Queensland Fruit Fly vs common drosophila fly
2 April 2015
Some members of the public have asked why we are so concerned about fruit flies when we see these all the time hanging around our compost bins. Queensland fruit flies (QFF) are different from small...
Queensland Fruit Fly vs common drosophila fly
2 April 2015

Some members of the public have asked why we are so concerned about fruit flies when we see these all the time hanging around our compost bins.

Queensland fruit flies (QFF) are different from small dark brown drosophila flies (also called vinegar flies or ferment flies) that hang around ripe and decaying fruit.

The QFF is around 6–8mm in length and is brown marked with yellow. A vinegar fly is much smaller, around 2mm in length (smaller than a common sand fly).

Most drosophila flies are not agricultural pests. However, they can be a nuisance where fruit and vegetables are stored.

One exception is the spotted wing drosophila which is a serious biosecurity threat and on the kiwifruit industry’s most unwanted list. The spotted wing drosophila is not present in New Zealand.
 

R&D News
2 April 2015
Compost trial using reject kiwifruit
2 April 2015
KVH has been working with the Bay of Plenty Regional Council to reduce the amount of wild kiwifruit establishing in the Bay of Plenty’s gullies, bush margins and production forests. ...
Compost trial using reject kiwifruit
2 April 2015

KVH has been working with the Bay of Plenty Regional Council to reduce the amount of wild kiwifruit establishing in the Bay of Plenty’s gullies, bush margins and production forests. 

Wild kiwifruit is an environmentally damaging vine and may harbour Psa-V or other pests, which can then spread to nearby orchards.  Reject fruit fed to livestock may be a potential seed-source of further wild vines, establishing when birds such as waxeyes feed on the softening fruit and distribute the seed.

A trial was undertaken by Kawerau-based Plateau Bark to see if compost could be made using reject fruit (and associated debris) mixed with pulp waste from the Norske Skog Tasman Ltd pulp and paper mill.  The composted material was regularly turned and monitored.  The trial was overseen by Plant and Food Research. 

Temperatures within the compost piles were logged and found to be regularly above 60 degrees Celcius. Testing confirmed the end product was Psa-V ‘not-detected’ and kiwifruit seed had been destroyed during the high-temperature composting process.

KVH is now advancing the process to name Plateau Bark as a KVH-approved compost manufacturer using reject kiwifruit.  Ongoing approval will depend on the compost product being consistently manufactured to prescribed standards, regularly monitored and free of Psa-V, other harmful pathogens and viable kiwifruit seed. 

The relevant KVH Protocols will be amended to allow KVH-approved compost manufacturers to spread compost containing reject fruit, made to prescribed standards, onto Psa-V positive orchards in Recovery Regions.

For more information on this project, contact John Mather or Karyn Lowry at KVH on 0800 665 825.
 

Protocols & Movement Controls
2 April 2015
Nursery plant movements
2 April 2015
All nurseries that sell and distribute kiwifruit plants are required to register with KVH on an annual basis.  Non-registered nurseries or nurseries that have let their registration lapse cannot...
Nursery plant movements
2 April 2015

All nurseries that sell and distribute kiwifruit plants are required to register with KVH on an annual basis.  Non-registered nurseries or nurseries that have let their registration lapse cannot dispatch kiwifruit plants. A list of KVH-registered nurseries is available on the KVH website here.

To avoid supply shortages, growers need to order plants well in advance so nurseries can anticipate industry demand. Plants ordered for dispatch after 1 October 2016 must be certified under the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS).

Growers also have an obligation when purchasing plants to ensure the nursery is registered and movement controls are complied with. If you have any concerns about the plants you are purchasing this season and/or the movement controls associated with them, please call KVH to check first – 0800 665 825.

Transport requirements
KVH Protocols state that kiwifruit plant material (budwood, pollen, rootstock etc.) and other risk items (harvest bins) must be securely covered when moving between sites/regions to reduce the risk of disease spread. Nursery plants are also required to be sprayed with copper prior to dispatch and tested for Psa-V within six weeks of movement occurring.

KVH Protocols provide protection for transit regions that have limited Psa-V infection or where Psa-V has not yet been detected.

If you are planning on moving plant material or other risk items, please check the KVH Protocols on the website. If you are unsure please give us a call – 0800 665 825.
 

Grower News
19 March 2015
2015 KVH Seasonal Management Guide now available
19 March 2015
The 2015 Psa-V Seasonal Management Guide is now available on the KVH website – click here. This new guide provides a basis for growers to build their individual Psa-V Orchard Management Plans...
2015 KVH Seasonal Management Guide now available
19 March 2015

The 2015 Psa-V Seasonal Management Guide is now available on the KVH website – click here.

This new guide provides a basis for growers to build their individual Psa-V Orchard Management Plans for the coming season.

The 2015 guide incorporates year-round advice for managing Psa-V. Previous Seasonal Management Guides have been split into Autumn/Winter and Spring/Summer seasons.

Grower News
19 March 2015
Autumn and harvest tips for a successful season
19 March 2015
Good management of Psa-V through autumn helps minimise disease levels seen in the following spring. Maintain a protective spray programme throughout autumn. Ensure cover is in place prior...
Autumn and harvest tips for a successful season
19 March 2015

Good management of Psa-V through autumn helps minimise disease levels seen in the following spring.

  • Maintain a protective spray programme throughout autumn.
  • Ensure cover is in place prior to high-risk weather or as soon as possible following weather events.
  • Immediately postharvest, apply copper and Actigard™ to protect fruit stalks. Consider using adjuvants to improve spray coverage at this time. If canopy condition allows, reapply Actigard™ three weeks later to extend protection into the leaf-fall period. A maximum of four Actigard™ applications (including soil applied sprays) are allowed per season.
  • Avoid spray drift of postharvest sprays onto unharvested fruit.  Spray residues limit market access for fruit and can impact customer confidence. Report any problems to your exporter.  Thoroughly clean spray tanks to prevent risk of residues.
Biosecurity News
19 March 2015
Queensland fruit fly response - one month on
19 March 2015
The response to the Queensland Fruit Fly outbreak in Auckland has now been operating for more than a month and is likely to continue for many more. Field work, including intensive trapping, baiting...
Queensland fruit fly response - one month on
19 March 2015

The response to the Queensland Fruit Fly outbreak in Auckland has now been operating for more than a month and is likely to continue for many more.

Field work, including intensive trapping, baiting and fruit collection and sampling also continue.

To date, 14 adult fruit flies had been found within the controlled area; and fruit fly larvae had been found in five separate properties within very close proximity of each other.

The infected properties continue to receive intensive ground treatment for fruit fly, including targeted foliage spraying and the use of insecticide granules. The ground surrounding the trees where larvae were found has been thoroughly sprayed and sealed with a polythene plastic cover (pictured above).

Any future developments will be communicated through the KVH website.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz