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Winter rates of copper
28 May 2015
Growers should now be moving to winter rates of copper. Copper use reduces through summer and coverage needs to be rebuilt as the risk of frost and hail increases and wetter conditions prevail. ...
Winter rates of copper
28 May 2015

Growers should now be moving to winter rates of copper. Copper use reduces through summer and coverage needs to be rebuilt as the risk of frost and hail increases and wetter conditions prevail.  Leaf spotting from spring infection still provides inoculum sources and heavy morning dews can provide sufficient moisture to re-activate Psa. 

Growers beginning winter work on Gold3 are noting some dehydrated cane and cane die-back in their canopies; and some Hayward growers in the Katikati region have also commented they are seeing new spotting on Hayward leaves. This indicates recent Psa infection and reminds us that Psa has not disappeared.

Frost damage, leaf-fall, wounds created when dropping strung canes and pruning activities all create opportunity for Psa to enter. Therefore levels of inoculum in the canopy must be managed.

After harvest, a copper and Actigard™ mix is recommended if leaf condition remains strong (leaves must be actively photosynthesizing to maximise the value of Actigard™). Do not apply Actigard™ to stressed vines.  Further applications of copper will be needed through the leaf-fall period and before and after winter pruning. Protection through dormancy presents much lower risk of phytotoxic effects.

Also, check the coverage of sprays applied.  Slow down to maximise the value of the applied products and avoid product waste through run-off.  Addition of spreaders will improve coverage and penetration into cracks and crevices. Time on target is important, and alternating the direction of travel for consecutive spray passes will help compensate for shadowing from pergola structures.

Linda Peacock, KVH Operations

Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme moves to single Standard
28 May 2015
It has been a year since the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) was introduced through the launch of the ‘Core’ Standard. During this time the Scheme has gained momentum with...
Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme moves to single Standard
28 May 2015

It has been a year since the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) was introduced through the launch of the ‘Core’ Standard.

During this time the Scheme has gained momentum with nurseries and growers. To date, four nurseries have met the Standard and are now selling certified plants; and KVH is working with other nurseries who intend to meet the requirements of the Standard and join the scheme.

Over the last year KVH has consulted with nurseries and growers, and hosted two KPCS workshops with members of the nursery, grower and science communities.

Engagement with the industry has been an important part of the development process and this feedback is now being incorporated to better improve the KPCS for nurseries and growers.

Yesterday an update was sent to all kiwifruit nurseries outlining the current status and future direction of the Scheme, and this included the move to one Standard only (initially a more rigorous, High-Health Standard was planned for development). The single standard will be no longer be referred to as the ‘Core’ Standard but the ‘KPCS Standard’.  This change is reflective of the feedback and suggestions received from the nursery and grower communities.

  • Click here to read the update and for more information about the Scheme and its future direction. 

Matt Dyck, KVH Biosecurity

MPI cost recovery for food safety and biosecurity
28 May 2015
MPI have completed a review of how costs are recovered from individuals and industries for food safety and biosecurity services and have updated a number of fees that will come into effect on 1 July...
MPI cost recovery for food safety and biosecurity
28 May 2015

MPI have completed a review of how costs are recovered from individuals and industries for food safety and biosecurity services and have updated a number of fees that will come into effect on 1 July 2015.

KVH has been involved in the consultation process of the Cost Recovery Review and supports a user-pays approach and changes to regulations and operating procedures that result in better biosecurity protection for our industry.

The user-pays approach is consistent with the new passenger surcharge at the border announced in the last week’s budget.

Details on the fee changes for biosecurity services are available on the MPI website.

Matt Dyck, KVH Biosecurity

Frost protection
28 May 2015
Immature growth and leaves must remain protected through the autumn period with copper applications, particularly in frost-prone areas. Many growers choose not to use frost protection as leaf-fall...
Frost protection
28 May 2015

Immature growth and leaves must remain protected through the autumn period with copper applications, particularly in frost-prone areas.

Many growers choose not to use frost protection as leaf-fall allows pruning to get underway. However, with frost comes the added risk of Psa movement into leaf and cane tissue. 

Inoculum levels within the orchard must be minimised to avoid disease spread. Growers with frost protection, particularly those with windmills, should consider protecting high-risk blocks such as developing Gold3 canopies and young plants. Psa multiplication is rapid in frosted tissue and the colder the frost, the higher the risk.

Italian research also showed water-soaked leaves damaged by frost developed Psa in 100% of cases when sprayed with Psa inoculum vs 20% infection for non-frosted leaves.

Once plants harden off in winter this risks reduces. Males are likely to be vulnerable later into the season as they are often slower to lose their leaves.

Linda Peacock, KVH Operations

Australia recruits Sunraysia growers in the fight against fruit fly
14 May 2015
Citrus, stone fruit and table grape growers in the Australian region of Sunraysia are being asked to take a role in eradicating Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) from the region in an attempt to regain the...
Australia recruits Sunraysia growers in the fight against fruit fly
14 May 2015

Citrus, stone fruit and table grape growers in the Australian region of Sunraysia are being asked to take a role in eradicating Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) from the region in an attempt to regain the region’s Pest Free Area status.

This is an innovative approach that involves growers deploying traps to monitor QFF presence/ absence and population numbers. These traps are separate from the official trapping system and serve as an indicator for when growers should apply management practices such as insecticide application, baiting and cover spray.

Sunraysia is an important horticultural region in Australia renowned for the production of high value crops. Invasive pressure from the QFF has resulted in the suspension of Sunraysia’s Pest Free Area status for QFF, meaning additional controls are now required for produce exported from this region.

Matt Dyck, KVH Biosecurity

MPI audit the greater Sunraysia pest free area
14 May 2015
In November 2014, MPI undertook an audit of Australia’s Department of Agriculture processes and procedures for managing the export of Mediterranean fruit fly and cucumber fruit fly host...
MPI audit the greater Sunraysia pest free area
14 May 2015

In November 2014, MPI undertook an audit of Australia’s Department of Agriculture processes and procedures for managing the export of Mediterranean fruit fly and cucumber fruit fly host products from the Greater Sunraysia pest free area (PFA) to New Zealand. 

The audit also included reviewing the operation of cold treatment protocols for the export of Queensland fruit fly (QFF) host products from Sunraysia. As the Greater Sunraysia district is not currently a PFA for QFF, QFF hosts must be effectively treated prior to export to NZ. MPI recognises Sunraysia as a PFA for Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly) and cucumber fruit fly.

MPI’s audit did not identify any critical situations in the system that would affect the risk of importing commercially produced fruit fly host commodities from the Greater Sunraysia PFA but made a number of recommendations for quality improvement. The recommendations mostly concerned documentation, dissemination of information about the fruit fly code of practice, internal audit and peer review processes.

Audits are part of MPI’s review activities of fruit fly management programmes with Australia and other countries to ensure an appropriate level of biosecurity risk management is maintained.

Matt Dyck, KVH Biosecurity

Australian horticulture get funding boost to fight fruit fly
14 May 2015
The Australian government has provided their horticulture sector with a funding boost of A$5.8m for two research projects. One project aims to deliver a farm-level support tool to assist growers with...
Australian horticulture get funding boost to fight fruit fly
14 May 2015

The Australian government has provided their horticulture sector with a funding boost of A$5.8m for two research projects. One project aims to deliver a farm-level support tool to assist growers with orchard activities, including early detection of pest and disease outbreaks; and the other project will look into area-wide management of fruit fly providing guidelines for efficient and effective pest suppression and stakeholder adoption.

Horticulture Innovation Australia, who are leading the projects, state that Queensland Fruit Fly results in losses of more than A$100m each year to Australia and is a major barrier to offshore markets.

Matt Dyck, KVH Biosecurity

PMAC fruit fly preparedness project
14 May 2015
As advised in a previous Bulletin, KVH and Zespri are members of the Plant Market Access Council (PMAC) fruit fly preparedness project. This project aims to pre-emptively agree market access...
PMAC fruit fly preparedness project
14 May 2015

As advised in a previous Bulletin, KVH and Zespri are members of the Plant Market Access Council (PMAC) fruit fly preparedness project. This project aims to pre-emptively agree market access conditions with key markets in the event of an incursion of a significant fruit fly species in New Zealand and minimise market access impacts.  Below is an update on the project.

  • A negotiating protocol for key trading partners has been developed which demonstrates how NZ will be able to export fruit fly-free product during a fruit fly incursion and/or if fruit fly were to establish here.
  • A scientific based model has been developed for inclusion in the protocol. The model calculates the key triggers that determine the status of the response by taking into account things like location – i.e. is the location rural or urban.

Negotiations with trading partners will begin once the protocol and the model are finalised and are likely to be a lengthy process. While some negotiations may take less than a year, it is possible that many of them will take longer. Ironically, it’s believed the response to the QFF in Grey Lynn this year may reduce the length of some of these negotiations. In some instances, information in the protocol was used during this recent response to liaise with key officials in some markets.

The negotiation process will be carried out in three stages based on the potential zones identified in an incursion response. Three different categories for negotiation have been identified:

  • Outside the designated control zone where export should be able to continue without any additional controls (phase 1)
  • Outside the controlled zone but passing through it to be exported and so requiring specific protection (phase 2)
  • Within the controlled zone requiring treatments to control any fruit fly (phase 3)

Once pre-emptive agreements are in place with key trading partners, these agreements should minimise market access impacts during a fruit fly response or incursion.

Barry O’Neil, KVH Chief Executive

Working collectively to manage abandoned orchards
14 May 2015
There are now 108 abandoned orchards on the KVH register that have either been removed, or are in the process of being removed, since 2013. KVH continues to work with land owners and regional...
Working collectively to manage abandoned orchards
14 May 2015

There are now 108 abandoned orchards on the KVH register that have either been removed, or are in the process of being removed, since 2013.

KVH continues to work with land owners and regional councils to manage these orchards which pose a risk of Psa-V spread.

Over the last six months Bay of Plenty Regional Council has contributed $15,400 toward abandoned orchard removal costs in the region.

The removal of a 2.5 hectare abandoned orchard in Maketu was completed in April. The kiwifruit was planted adjacent to a chestnut orchard with vines smothering many of the chestnuts and willow shelter belt, killing many of the host trees.  The property Trust/owners and Bay of Plenty Regional Council assisted with removal costs.

Plans are progressing for the removal of two large abandoned orchards (totalling 4.7ha) near Ruatoria; and the removal of a one-hectare very abandoned orchard at Collingwood in Golden Bay is also progressing.  The kiwifruit vines and structures are heavily interspersed with mature ponga, mahoe and other native plants. 

John Mather, KVH Biosecurity
 

KVH meets John Key
14 May 2015
Representatives from KVH met with Prime Minister John Key yesterday when he visited the kiwifruit industry as part of a day-long visit to the Bay of Plenty. KVH took the brief opportunity to talk to...
KVH meets John Key
14 May 2015

Representatives from KVH met with Prime Minister John Key yesterday when he visited the kiwifruit industry as part of a day-long visit to the Bay of Plenty.

KVH took the brief opportunity to talk to Mr Key about KVH’s recent areas of focus including the industry’s participation in the Queensland fruit fly response in Auckland, raising public awareness of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and our role in Government Industry Agreements.  Mr Key was particularly interested in the BMSB and its impact on primary industries should it establish in New Zealand.

Mr Key spoke to a crowd of around 200 industry people and acknowledged the biosecurity challenges New Zealand faces as a small trading country and the many ways biosecurity risks can come into New Zealand.

During the visit Mr Key also paid tribute to kiwifruit industry for its ability to recover in the wake of Psa-V.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications
 

International Psa-V update
14 May 2015
Zespri’s Shane Max recently gave an update on international Psa-V progression and how their offshore growers were faring as they are now well into the spring growing season. A short,...
International Psa-V update
14 May 2015

Zespri’s Shane Max recently gave an update on international Psa-V progression and how their offshore growers were faring as they are now well into the spring growing season.

A short, seven-minute video presentation with updates from Japan, Korea, France and Italy can be viewed here.

The video concludes with some important take-home messages for New Zealand growers.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications

Dont get complacent with Psa
14 May 2015
While Psa-V progression has slowed during the 2014-15 growing season in most regions, its important growers don’t become complacent with their Psa-V management, particularly as we head into...
Dont get complacent with Psa
14 May 2015

While Psa-V progression has slowed during the 2014-15 growing season in most regions, its important growers don’t become complacent with their Psa-V management, particularly as we head into winter.

A better understanding of managing the disease, combined with a fairly warm, dry growing season has resulted in a significant drop in Psa-V levels on most orchards.

However some orchards, particularly those in challenged locations, still have significant Psa-V pressure impacting on yields and orchard profitability. The photo above shows cane dieback and fruit shrivel on a Gold3 orchard in a challenged Waihi site.

This is a reminder that disease levels could quickly increase in any orchard as the weather becomes cooler and wetter, and if Psa-V is not proactively managed.

Immediately after harvest apply copper to protect fruit stalks. Using summer rates of copper will minimise leaf damage and is recommended if copper is being combined with Actigard™ as leaves need to be actively photosynthesising  for Actigard™ to be properly absorbed.  Where maintenance of leaf condition is less critical apply copper at winter rates. Do not apply Actigard™ to stressed vines.

All growers should be maintaining protective spray programmes in the lead up to winter and ensuring best-practice hygiene is carried out through the remainder of harvest and pruning. This will provide the best possible start for orchards next spring.

Peter Mourits, KVH Operations

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What Is Psa

Protection

How do I protect my orchard from Psa?
 


 

Testing

What do I do if I think I have Psa?
 


 

Psa Positive

What happens now?