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Kiwifruit industry to sign Operational Agreement for fruit flies
5 May 2016
Next week Kiwifruit Vine Health is expected to sign the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies on behalf of New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry.   This will be the first such agreement...
Kiwifruit industry to sign Operational Agreement for fruit flies
5 May 2016
Next week Kiwifruit Vine Health is expected to sign the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies on behalf of New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry.
 
This will be the first such agreement under the Government Industry Agreements (GIA) partnership and will help to further reduce the impacts of fruit flies to our horticulture sectors.
 
KVH Chief Executive Barry O’Neil explains the benefits of the OA for fruit flies.
 
“Signing the Operational Agreement is a significant milestone that will see GIA Deed signatories working together to help reduce the impacts of fruit fly.
 
“Essentially, the OA sets out the operational requirements for readiness and response activities for the four economically significant species of fruit flies (Queensland Fruit Fly, Mediterranean Fruit Fly, Oriental Fruit Fly and Melon Fruit Fly) and cost-sharing arrangements between Government and affected industries.
 
“Under the OA, KVH and other parties will agree a work plan to improve readiness and response, including reducing costs without reducing effectiveness.
 
“Being the first agreement of its type, it will set the platform for future OAs to be developed for other pests and diseases that can harm our horticultural industries.
 
“Fruit flies are the biggest biosecurity risk to the kiwifruit industry, in terms of both production and market access impacts. We’ve learnt that working together with Government and other affected industries provides a far better outcome during readiness and response activities. Signing the OA ensures joint decision-making and clarifies roles and responsibilities so all parties benefit.”
Invasive Alligator weed found in Opotiki orchard
5 May 2016
Alligator weed, an eradication category pest in the Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s pest management plan, has been found in an Opotiki kiwifruit orchard.   The invasive weed (pictured),...
Invasive Alligator weed found in Opotiki orchard
5 May 2016
Alligator weed, an eradication category pest in the Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s pest management plan, has been found in an Opotiki kiwifruit orchard.
 
The invasive weed (pictured), is well established in the Northland area and parts of the Waikato, but is rare or not present elsewhere.  Research in Italy claims Psa can colonise and survive on a group of weed species including alligator weed. KVH is following up on this.
 
It was detected by a vigilant AgFirst employee collecting kiwifruit samples for maturity testing.  
 
The Bay of Plenty Regional Council will manage and fund an eradication programme.
 
Growers in the Opotiki area are asked to look out for the weed, which is fast-growing and would compete with kiwifruit for nutrients in the orchard. 
 
Alligator weed is a persistent aquatic and land weed with dark-green waxy leaves in opposite pairs. Stems are hollow and often reddish in colour. White clover-like flowers, 1-2 cm in diameter, appear during summer and autumn.  
 
Although alligator weed does not produce viable seed in New Zealand it can readily spread through stem fragments attached to tractor tyres or other machinery. 
 
If you suspect alligator weed is present in your orchard, contact a biosecurity officer at your local regional council.  Opotiki growers should contact Sam Stephens, Land Management Officer—Biosecurity, phone 0800 884 880.
 
Click here for a fact sheet about alligator weed.
More nursery options for sourcing certified plants
5 May 2016
The kiwifruit industry now has two new nursery options to choose from when purchasing certified plants under the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS).   Niwa Nursery, located in...
More nursery options for sourcing certified plants
5 May 2016
The kiwifruit industry now has two new nursery options to choose from when purchasing certified plants under the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS).
 
Niwa Nursery, located in Whakatane, and Nga Rakau Nursery in North West Auckland, have recently joined the KPCS and are now selling KPCS-certified plants. Nga Rakau nursery sells only the smaller ‘grow-on-line’ plants which are too small to be planted out directly and are usually purchased by other nurseries to grow on. Niwa Nursery sells field grown Bruno rootstock ready for planting.
 
By joining the KPCS, these nurseries demonstrate they are managing biosecurity risks, have been independently audited, visually inspected for target organisms and returned a non-detected result for a very comprehensive testing regime for Psa-V.
 
Eight nurseries have now joined the KPCS and are supplying certified plants and two others are in the final stages of becoming part of the Scheme. Click here for a list of nurseries and their status.
 
Please be reminded that on 1 October 2016 the KPCS will be fully implemented. This means only KPCS certified kiwifruit plants may be bought or sold after this date. However, growers will still be able to produce up to 1000 kiwifruit plants for movement between their own properties within the same Psa-V region.
 
Growers should be ordering kiwifruit plants well in advance (at least one year) to enable nurseries to anticipate demand. Click here for a grower fact sheet on the KPCS.
Protecting orchards after harvest
21 April 2016
Immediately following harvest, growers should be getting copper spray programmes underway to help prevent Psa entering their vines through harvest wounds and leaf scars. Incorporation of Actigard...
Protecting orchards after harvest
21 April 2016

Immediately following harvest, growers should be getting copper spray programmes underway to help prevent Psa entering their vines through harvest wounds and leaf scars.

Incorporation of Actigard into a post-harvest programme will reduce the likelihood of disease symptoms appearing the following spring. Actigard can be tank mixed with copper and is most effective when applied to leaves that are still in good condition. Extreme care must be taken to avoid spray drift onto unharvested blocks.

Following the discovery of copper-tolerant and streptomycin-resistant Psa developing on some orchards, a robust spray programme and cutting out infected material is particulary important through autumn and winter to reduce the spread of these new Psa strains.

Best practice advice for post-harvest protection and managing tolerance and resistance:

  • Starting after harvest, maintain a comprehensive copper programme through autum and winter including a minimum of five copper applications at full winter rates.
  • Ensure water rates are sufficient for complete canopy coverage. The addition of spreaders will improve coverage.
  • As autumn progresses, maintain copper cover to protect fresh leaf scars. This is particularly important following the use of leaf drop sprays.
  • Carry out good tool hygiene between vines during winter pruning and remove infected material from orchards.
  • Apply coppers prior and post winter pruning.

Autumn and winter are high-risk periods for Psa-V. While vines are dormant the disease can still be active and enter through pruning wounds, new grafts and frost-damaged tissue.

For more information, refer to KVH’s Psa-V Best Practice Guide at www.kvh.org.nz/seasonal_advice.

Any growers concerned they may not be achieving the expected levels of Psa control from copper applications at label rates should contact KVH on 0800 665 825 or email info@kvh.org.nz.

Protect young plants through autumn
21 April 2016
Young plants, or vines newly grafted this season should be protected through the autumn period—particularly those located in frost-prone sites or close to Psa-V affected locations. New leaf...
Protect young plants through autumn
21 April 2016

Young plants, or vines newly grafted this season should be protected through the autumn period—particularly those located in frost-prone sites or close to Psa-V affected locations.

New leaf spot symptoms are being seen on a number of sites indicating a lift in Psa-V activity as we begin to experience colder wetter weather periods.

A protective spray programme re-establishing copper cover is now high priority to protect young tissue and plants.

The KVH Psa-V Risk Model has predicted high risk periods for Psa-V over the last few weeks with these periods matching periods of rainfall.

Soil-applied Actigard - label claim lapses from May
21 April 2016
Actigard manufacturer Syngenta, will not be renewing the limited label claim on soil-applied Actigard from May 2016. Therefore, from May onwards soil-applied Actigard will be considered off-label...
Soil-applied Actigard - label claim lapses from May
21 April 2016

Actigard manufacturer Syngenta, will not be renewing the limited label claim on soil-applied Actigard from May 2016. Therefore, from May onwards soil-applied Actigard will be considered off-label use. However, it may still be approved by Zespri under Justified Approval (JA).

Foliar-applied Actigard is not affected by this change.

Please contact Sylvia Warren, Crop Protection Advisor on spraydiary@zespri.com for more information on a JA.

Strengthened border biosecurity pays off over summer
21 April 2016
Record numbers of arriving passengers into NZ over the 2015/16 summer have kept border biosecurity defences busy over the season. However, strengthened biosecurity measures have stopped hitchhiking...
Strengthened border biosecurity pays off over summer
21 April 2016

Record numbers of arriving passengers into NZ over the 2015/16 summer have kept border biosecurity defences busy over the season.

However, strengthened biosecurity measures have stopped hitchhiking pests and diseases from entering New Zealand without affecting passenger processing time. In fact, processing time is down on last year, and compliance rates (the amount of times MPI correctly detects risk goods carried by passengers) are up at 99%.

Significantly, these detections included 14 fruit fly found on passengers—reflecting the biosecurity risk pressure at our borders.

Strengthened biosecurity measures include:

  • 90 new frontline officers and 24 new detector dog teams
  • Introduction of a mobile x-ray scanner to clear cruise ship passengers
  • Raising risk assessment levels
  • Heavy investment in public biosecurity awareness
  • A stricter approach with fining passengers who break the rules

Click here to read more on MPI’s website.

Snapshot of summer biosecurity stats and facts
21 April 2016
MPI’s latest summer statistics are a good indication of the pressure New Zealand’s borders are facing. Here’s a snapshot of some interesting stats: 14—number of fruit...
Snapshot of summer biosecurity stats and facts
21 April 2016

MPI’s latest summer statistics are a good indication of the pressure New Zealand’s borders are facing. Here’s a snapshot of some interesting stats:

  • 14—number of fruit flies intercepted in fresh produce risk items between December 2015 and February 2016
  • 38—number of Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (mostly dead) intercepted at the border
  • 4148—undeclared risk items seized from air passengers, an increase of 28% from last summer
  • 1109—risk items intercepted from cruise ship passengers, an increase of 84% from last summer
  • 3.4—average risk items per cruise ship detected by biosecurity detector dogs
  • 2288—infringement notices issued ($400 fine), an increase of 41% from last summer
  • 343—number of inspections on arriving yachts
  • 216—number of yachts carrying fruit fly risk items

Click here for full details.

Harvest hygiene : multi-language biosecurity guides available online
7 April 2016
In 2012 KVH developed the Psa-V biosecurity pocket guide and translated it into several languages to promote harvest hygiene messages. English | Maori | Hindi | Nepalese | Punjabi | Samoan | Spanish...
Harvest hygiene : multi-language biosecurity guides available online
7 April 2016

In 2012 KVH developed the Psa-V biosecurity pocket guide and translated it into several languages to promote harvest hygiene messages.

 
These tools are quick, step-by-step, visual reference guides for use by all growers, on-orchard harvest workers, auditors, transporters, postharvest and harvest contractors.
 
Movement of plant material during harvest is a concern for the kiwifruit industry in the Psa-V environment. Everyone in contact with orchards at this time of the year must be fully aware of best practice orchard hygiene.
 
Movement control rules for kiwifruit firewood
7 April 2016
Kiwifruit trunks make great firewood, but growers and orchard managers are reminded of movement control rules for all kiwifruit plant material moving off an orchard.  This includes kiwifruit...
Movement control rules for kiwifruit firewood
7 April 2016

Kiwifruit trunks make great firewood, but growers and orchard managers are reminded of movement control rules for all kiwifruit plant material moving off an orchard.  This includes kiwifruit trunks used as firewood.

KVH permission is required if kiwifruit firewood is moved from a Psa-V positive orchard.  The only circumstance under which a permission may be given is if the firewood is moved to a location within the same Recovery region.  The firewood must be covered in transit.

Moving kiwifruit firewood from a Psa-V positive orchard to a location in a different region, is prohibited. The reason for this rule is to restrict movement of kiwifruit plant material across regions and reduce the risk of resistant bacteria or other pathogens or pests being moved significant distances.  KVH wants consistency in managing risk associated with the movement of all plant material.

The KVH Protocol for movement of kiwifruit firewood can be viewed here. 

The rule of thumb is to dispose of all kiwifruit plant material on the property of origin using approved disposal methods.  These include mulching, burial or burning.  Further information can be found in the KVH Protocol for disposal methods, which can be viewed here.  

Do not throw the trunks over a bank as they are likely to regrow and cost the landowner to control as wild kiwifruit.

 
Movement control rules for machinery during harvest
7 April 2016
Growers and contractors are reminded that prior to any movement of orchard machinery they should refer to the relevant KVH Protocol, to confirm whether permission from KVH is required.  The need...
Movement control rules for machinery during harvest
7 April 2016

Growers and contractors are reminded that prior to any movement of orchard machinery they should refer to the relevant KVH Protocol, to confirm whether permission from KVH is required.  The need for permission is dependent on the regional classification of where you are moving the machinery from or to.  This includes movement of tractors from a machinery sales yard.

Click here to view the KVH Protocol for orchard machinery and infrastructure. 

Click here for more information on regional classifications.
 
Machinery must have all plant material removed, be thoroughly washed and sanitised with a KVH approved product.  The list of approved sanitisers can be found here.
 
The Psa-V incursion has led to orchardists’ adopting world-leading, best-practice hygiene procedures.  This practice is valuable in preventing the spread of many harmful pathogens, including resistant bacteria.  Orchard owners and contractors must keep to the rules and maintain best practice, including during harvest.
 
Buying and selling kiwifruit plants after 1 October 2016
7 April 2016
 On 1 October 2016 new conditions around buying and selling kiwifruit plants will come into effect when the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) becomes mandatory. This means only...
Buying and selling kiwifruit plants after 1 October 2016
7 April 2016

 On 1 October 2016 new conditions around buying and selling kiwifruit plants will come into effect when the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) becomes mandatory.

This means only KPCS-certified kiwifruit plants may be bought or sold after this date. However, growers will still be able to ‘grow for their own use’ up to 1000 kiwifruit plants for movement between their own properties within the same Psa-V region.

In the March Kiwiflier growers will have received an information sheet about the KPCS, outlining their options and requirements from 1 October – click here for the online version.

It is important growers are not only aware of their options from 1 October, but they also need to order kiwifruit plants for the upcoming season well in advance (at least one year) to enable nurseries to anticipate demand.

The KPCS has been in place for almost two years and some nurseries have already joined the Scheme and are producing certified plants in several regions – click here for the list of these nurseries.

What Is Psa

Protection

How do I protect my orchard from Psa?
 


 

Testing

What do I do if I think I have Psa?
 


 

Psa Positive

What happens now?