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Company Notices
22 March 2018
New Chief Executive onboard next week
22 March 2018
KVH is excited to be welcoming new Chief Executive Stu Hutchings to the team on Monday. Prior to taking up the new role Stu was a Group Manager for OSPRI, a partnership between primary industries...
New Chief Executive onboard next week
22 March 2018

KVH is excited to be welcoming new Chief Executive Stu Hutchings to the team on Monday.

Prior to taking up the new role Stu was a Group Manager for OSPRI, a partnership between primary industries and government to manage the NAIT and TBfree programmes. He has had experience as Acting Chief Executive there, aswell as at the Animal Health Board.

Stu comes to the kiwifruit industry experienced in management of biosecurity risks, developing research and innovation programmes, and working on a day-to-day basis with farmers and growers, alongside industry and government.

The focus for Stu once he’s in the hot seat next week is to get out and meet growers and industry people, and ensuring there is full representation for all kiwifruit growers (through KVH) to protect orchards and livelihoods from our most unwanted and destructive pests and pathogens.

Read more about Stu and the December announcement of his appointment in the KVH press release.

Biosecurity News
22 March 2018
Unwanted!
22 March 2018
Each month we profile one of the 12 most unwanted pests featured on our ‘Port of Tauranga – committed to biosecurity excellence’ calendar. They could all potentially enter our...
Unwanted!
22 March 2018

Each month we profile one of the 12 most unwanted pests featured on our ‘Port of Tauranga – committed to biosecurity excellence’ calendar. They could all potentially enter our borders and have a major impact on the local community and businesses, the kiwifruit industry or other local growers.

This month, the focus is on the Painted Apple Moth (PAM).



A voracious and indiscriminate eater, the PAM from South Australia is a threat to horticulture, forestry, and possibly indigenous trees. It attacks the fruit and leaves of multiple horticultural crops and although kiwifruit is not a reported host an incursion may still have implications. A previous incursion in Auckland (1999) had significant impacts until it was successfully declared as eradicated in 2006.

The economic analysis of its potential impact in New Zealand was determined to be up to $356 million. At least three quarters of these impacts would have been production losses and spraying costs in plantation forestry. About $65 million was spent on the successful eradication programme.

The male moth has a 2.5cm wingspan, a dark brown forewing marked with a black band, and an orange hindwing. The wingless female moth is about 1cm long and is covered with thick short brown hairs - she looks like a small, brown, hairy cocoon. The mature larva or caterpillar is about 3cm long and is covered with dense brown hairs.

Everyone can play a part in keeping unwanted pests and diseases out of New Zealand. If you come across anything unusual catch it, take a photo, and report it to the exotic pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66.

Biosecurity News
22 March 2018
Rules reminder: importing kiwifruit seed
22 March 2018
KVH is aware of an international website offering several varieties of kiwifruit seed for sale. This is concerning because buying seeds online for import into New Zealand could risk introducing a...
Rules reminder: importing kiwifruit seed
22 March 2018

KVH is aware of an international website offering several varieties of kiwifruit seed for sale. This is concerning because buying seeds online for import into New Zealand could risk introducing a plant disease.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) enforcement staff are fully aware of the site.

There are strict rules around importing any kiwifruit seed. Seed intended for growing requires a permit to import and a phytosanitary certificate. It must be imported into post entry quarantine where it will be grown and checked for a range of viruses and other plant disease organisms. No seeds will be given biosecurity clearance; only plants which have been inspected and tested will be eligible for clearance.

MPI enforce all requirements and investigate any report of kiwifruit plants grown from unapproved seed imports. Please alert MPI if you aware of any unapproved kiwifruit seed imports by calling the exotic pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66 or contact KVH on 0800 665 825.

Biosecurity News
22 March 2018
Myrtle rust found in new region
22 March 2018
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) announced earlier this week that myrtle rust has been detected in Manawatu for the first time. The fungus was found on a young ramarama in a planted area...
Myrtle rust found in new region
22 March 2018

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) announced earlier this week that myrtle rust has been detected in Manawatu for the first time.

The fungus was found on a young ramarama in a planted area off Victoria Esplanade in Palmerston North.

The infected plant will be removed and securely disposed of and a surveillance team will start inspecting myrtle plants on all properties within a 200-metre radius.

As at this Monday, there have been a total of 409 properties affected by myrtle rust: Northland (four properties), Auckland (63), Waikato (33), Bay of Plenty (92), Taranaki (200), Manawatu (1) and Wellington (16). In the last couple of weeks, most detections have been in Taranaki and Auckland.

Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit plants, it is still important growers check myrtle plants on their properties and in their gardens. At this time of year, the fungus is still in its ‘spreading’ stage and is very visible. Without touching the plant, you can look on either side of the leaves and new shoots for any sign of a bright yellow, powdery eruption. Some leaves could also be buckled or twisted or look diseased with dry pustules that are grey or brown.

It’s important not to touch the plants or brush against them, as this can disrupt the spores and speed up its spread.

Any suspected cases of myrtle rust can be reported to the MPI hotline on 0800 80 99 66. MPI will investigate suspected cases, track and monitor spread, and collect information to help understand the disease’s impact on New Zealand.

KVH has recently taken part in myrtle rust surveillance training with Tauranga Moana Iwi, focused especially around Mauao/Mount Maunganui, to help raise awareness of the fungus, what to look out for, and what to do if symptoms are seen.

 

Biosecurity News
22 March 2018
Making sure the kiwifruit industry has a say
22 March 2018
KVH has an active advocacy role for the kiwifruit industry, working with regulators to influence biosecurity legislation, policies and standards that may impact on the industry; and to influence...
Making sure the kiwifruit industry has a say
22 March 2018

KVH has an active advocacy role for the kiwifruit industry, working with regulators to influence biosecurity legislation, policies and standards that may impact on the industry; and to influence individual decisions on specific issues.

Submissions currently underway by KVH include:

·         A submission on the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) proposed changes to cost recovery for some services.  KVH’s submission details our support of MPI investing to improve effectiveness of the biosecurity system and reinforces our view that the system needs investment in pre-border activities as well as front line initiatives.

·         A submission to the Bay of Plenty Regional Council Long Term Plan to increase resourcing for biosecurity programmes and continue the partnership between the council, KVH, and landowners to destroy wild kiwifruit.

·         A submission to Auckland Council supporting the category and approach for wild kiwifruit management within their proposed Regional Pest Management Plan.

·         A submission to Marlborough District Council requesting wild kiwifruit be named an Exclusion Pest within their proposed Regional Pest Management Plan and included in the group of plants for which regular surveillance is undertaken.

These last three submissions also included requests that councils continue to assist MPI and the kiwifruit industry in any future response for pests such as Queensland Fruit Fly or Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, should they be detected within their regions.

Biosecurity News
22 March 2018
Reminder to be on the lookout for anything unusual
22 March 2018
Growers are asked to keep an eye out for signs of their fruit being affected by any pests or bugs, particularly deposits of white exudate on the outer skin. KVH and Zespri are working closely with...
Reminder to be on the lookout for anything unusual
22 March 2018

Growers are asked to keep an eye out for signs of their fruit being affected by any pests or bugs, particularly deposits of white exudate on the outer skin.

KVH and Zespri are working closely with a small number of growers in Northland (as well as with research experts) who have reported low levels of damage to some of their fruit, to learn more about what’s happening to the fruit itself and what’s been seen on the affected orchards.

Most of the damaged kiwifruit is being found on edge rows in blocks and includes very small pinprick sized holes on the fruit. The area around the hole can be slightly darker or slightly depressed. There is often a small white deposit near the holes, which can be easily brushed off.  



Growers have told us they’ve seen the same symptoms at this time of the year in the pa
st - especially the white exudate - so the recent warm, wet and humid weather conditions (typical of the season) are a timely reminder to be on the lookout.

KVH is keen to hear from any grower that may have similar symptoms so that we can learn more about where and when fruit is being affected.

If you spot anything similar let your postharvest company know, take a photo and report it to KVH by emailing info@kvh.org.nz or phone us on 0800 665 825.

Biosecurity News
22 March 2018
Summer action at the border
22 March 2018
It was a busy summer at New Zealand’s borders, with increases in almost every type of intervention activity for cargo, vessels, mail and passengers. The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI)...
Summer action at the border
22 March 2018

It was a busy summer at New Zealand’s borders, with increases in almost every type of intervention activity for cargo, vessels, mail and passengers.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) summer infographic report for December 2017 – February 2018 shows that stopping our most unwanted pests, namely fruit flies and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), is still a big focus.


There were 10 interceptions of fruit fly over the period and almost 200 BMSB events.  The BMSB statistics are up on the previous year, highlighting how much of an increased risk we face from this invasive pest as it spreads around other countries and how important it is we continue to take a hard line ensuring high-risk goods and freight is cleaned and treated offshore as much as possible.

Two million passengers arrived at our international airports over the three-month period, a 5% increase on the previous year. The most common undeclared item seized by officials was fresh produce, found 3,111 times. Fresh fruit and vegetables cannot be bought in to New Zealand by passengers and this material poses a great fruit fly risk –  check that anyone visiting or working on your orchard from overseas doesn’t have any fresh produce with them. Make sure any items they may have inadvertently bought with them is destroyed by being bagged and put in the rubbish, not composted.

Other summer statistics of interest for the kiwifruit industry:

·         17 bulk car carriers visited New Zealand. Four were denied entry due to the presence of live stink bugs associated with vehicles out of Japan.

·         1,821 cargo consignments were targeted for BMSB inspection. This is more than double the previous year due to increased targeting measures by MPI.

·         67,488 empty containers imported, 92% of which were clean on arrival.

KVH is fully supportive of the strong actions MPI staff are taking at the border, and the policy settings put in place to make sure the cargo and goods arriving here meet our strict biosecurity standards. We will continue to work closely with MPI to influence the development of policies and standards that may impact the kiwifruit industry, and to influence decisions on specific issues.

 

Company Notices
8 March 2018
Get your news from the KVH podcast
8 March 2018
The February Snapshot podcast is online summarising latest news and activities, seasonal orchard management advice, feature pests to be on the lookout for, and reminders of upcoming events....
Get your news from the KVH podcast
8 March 2018

The February Snapshot podcast is online summarising latest news and activities, seasonal orchard management advice, feature pests to be on the lookout for, and reminders of upcoming events. It’s free and available now on SoundCloud or from Apple iTunes.

We hope you enjoy listening and look forward to your feedback on this new channel of communication we’ve created to help make it easier for growers to stay up-to-date with the latest important news.

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
Top tips for harvest hygiene
8 March 2018
Harvest season presents a high-risk period for spreading Psa or other biosecurity risks between blocks, orchards and regions because of the numbers of vehicles, machinery and people movements...
Top tips for harvest hygiene
8 March 2018

Harvest season presents a high-risk period for spreading Psa or other biosecurity risks between blocks, orchards and regions because of the numbers of vehicles, machinery and people movements involved.

Growers are responsible for protecting their orchards, and others, by ensuring the movement of harvest equipment, people and bins onto and around their orchard is minimised.

Top tips for harvest hygiene preparation:

  • Clear loadout areas of weeds before harvest.
  • Clearly mark parking and hygiene control areas.
  • Allow only essential vehicles into the production area.
  • Limit access to established roads and tracks.
  • Make sure contractors and staff understand your hygiene requirements.
  • Check all equipment (harvest bins, harvest machinery, picking bags etc) coming on to your orchard is free of plant and soil material.
  • Ensure people check that clothing, particularly headwear and footwear, is free of plant material on entry and exit.
  • Do not allow workers to bring imported fruit onto the orchard.

With extra people through orchards more pairs of eyes can be on the lookout for unusual vine symptoms or pests. 

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
Welcome overseas workers, not their hitchhiking mates
8 March 2018
As the kiwifruit industry gears up for harvest, and the corresponding annual influx of overseas workers, it’s time to consider the risk to the biosecurity of our industry presented by overseas...
Welcome overseas workers, not their hitchhiking mates
8 March 2018

As the kiwifruit industry gears up for harvest, and the corresponding annual influx of overseas workers, it’s time to consider the risk to the biosecurity of our industry presented by overseas workers – or more accurately, their clothing, footwear and tools.

There are many biosecurity threats present in other growing regions around the world that are not here in New Zealand, and which could have a devastating impact on our industry. There have been several reports of fruit flies and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) incursions close to home in Australia, stink bugs continue to wreak havoc across Europe and the USA, and the soil-borne Brazilian Wilt has caused up to 50% vine loss on Brazilian kiwifruit orchards over recent years.

·         Make overseas workers aware of the need for excellent orchard hygiene.

·         Make sure they do not bring tools used overseas onto your orchard.

·         Check their footwear was cleaned and sanitised in their home country or at the border – don’t take any chances.

It’s important that you don’t allow any imported fruit to come on to your orchard. If you see or hear of someone that has accidently bought fruit or vegetables into New Zealand make sure it is reported to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and then appropriately destroyed by being bagged and put in the rubbish, not composted.

Keep an eye out for any unusual symptoms on your vines. If you observe any sudden vine wilt - for reasons other than the persistent heat recently - contact us immediately. We have great links to MPI and can quickly distinguish the unusual from the ordinary. We are always keen to hear from anyone who may have concerns.

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
Report confirms devastating impact of BMSB on horticulture
8 March 2018
A new economic report says if the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) established in New Zealand it would dramatically impact New Zealand’s gross domestic product (GDP) as well as export revenues...
Report confirms devastating impact of BMSB on horticulture
8 March 2018

A new economic report says if the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) established in New Zealand it would dramatically impact New Zealand’s gross domestic product (GDP) as well as export revenues from horticulture.

Prepared by the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research (NZIER), 
Quantifying the economic impacts of a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug incursion in New Zealand, shows GDP falling between $1.8 billion and $3.6 billion by 2038, and horticulture export value falling between $2 billion and $4.2 billion by 2038.

Super pests like the BMSB present a significant threat to the New Zealand kiwifruit industry and are considered one of our greatest risks. For our industry alone, the establishment of such a pest could result in production impacts in the order of hundreds of millions of dollars.

The report was commissioned by the Samurai Wasp Steering Group and funded by Horticulture New Zealand alongside KVH and several other horticultural industry groups. The steering group is looking at introduction of a biocontrol, the Samurai Wasp, to combat BMSB if it establishes in New Zealand. Read more about this work on the KVH website.

Read the media release about the report and its key findings here.

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
Stink bugs in Georgia
8 March 2018
They say a picture can paint a thousand words. Photos and videos just in from Georgia show the impact the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) has had on crops in the European country over recent years...
Stink bugs in Georgia
8 March 2018

They say a picture can paint a thousand words. Photos and videos just in from Georgia show the impact the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) has had on crops in the European country over recent years and reminds us why we absolutely must keep it out of New Zealand.

BMSB was first found in Georgia in 2015 and pest populations have built extremely quickly resulting in agricultural damage within just a few years. As an example of the damage it can do to one product alone, it destroyed much of the hazelnut harvest last year resulting in damages of NZD$84 million.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is aware of the situation with BMSB in Georgia and are managing pathways appropriately.

View the photos and videos here.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz