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Grower News
23 March 2017
Top tips for harvest hygiene
23 March 2017
Harvest season presents a high-risk period for spreading Psa-V or other biosecurity risks between blocks, orchards and regions because of the numbers of vehicles, machinery and people movements...
Top tips for harvest hygiene
23 March 2017

Harvest season presents a high-risk period for spreading Psa-V or other biosecurity risks between blocks, orchards and regions because of the numbers of vehicles, machinery and people movements involved.

Growers are responsible for protecting their orchards, and others, by ensuring the movement of harvest equipment, people and bins onto and around their orchard is minimised.

Top tips for harvest hygiene preparation:

• Clear loadout areas of weeds before harvest. We’re in the high-risk period for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), considered number two on Kiwifruit’s Most Unwanted biosecurity threats list, so be on the lookout.

• Clearly mark parking and hygiene control areas.

• Allow only essential vehicles into the production area.

• Limit access to established roads and tracks.

• Make sure contractors and staff understand your hygiene requirements.

• Check all equipment - harvest bins, harvest machinery, picking bags etc. coming on to your orchard are free of plant and soil material.

• Ensure people check that clothing (particularly headwear and footwear) is free of plant material on entry and exit.

• Do not allow workers to bring imported fruit onto the orchard or provide measures to ensure this fruit is not discarded near vines.

Having extra people through orchards means more pairs of eyes that can be on the lookout for unusual vine symptoms or pests – or BMSB.

Biosecurity News
23 March 2017
Remove flowering Pampas from kiwifruit orchards
23 March 2017
The invasive South American plant, Pampas, is well-established in most regions where kiwifruit is grown.  Pampas has now begun to flower and the seeds (more than 100,000 per flowerhead) will be...
Remove flowering Pampas from kiwifruit orchards
23 March 2017

The invasive South American plant, Pampas, is well-established in most regions where kiwifruit is grown.  Pampas has now begun to flower and the seeds (more than 100,000 per flowerhead) will be dispersed by strong winds.  Any Pampas growing in, or adjacent, to kiwifruit orchards can be a problem in that any seed attached to fruit is a reject factor, and may cause market access issues if found within a shipment or container.

If Pampas is established in your orchard or shelter belt, cut down and destroy the flowerheads now. 

Pampas plants can be dug out or removed by a digger, or controlled with glyphosate herbicide.  A surfactant/spreader needs to be added to the herbicide mixture. Do not attempt to spray Pampas in an orchard if fruit are still on vines. 

Pampas (Cortaderia selloana or C. jubata) is different from the native toetoe (Cortaderia fulvida) in that Pampas grows faster and is an invasive plant; it flowers in autumn rather than spring; is more robust and upright; and produces a different shaped and larger flowerhead (cone-shaped rather than flag-like). 

Contact John Mather at KVH at john.mather@kvh.org.nz if you would like any further information.

Grower News
23 March 2017
Social marketing pioneer visits New Zealand
23 March 2017
Dr Doug McKenzie-Mohr, an internationally-recognised commentator on design and delivery of community information programmes, was recently in Hamilton, taking part in a workshop programme on the...
Social marketing pioneer visits New Zealand
23 March 2017

Dr Doug McKenzie-Mohr, an internationally-recognised commentator on design and delivery of community information programmes, was recently in Hamilton, taking part in a workshop programme on the science and psychology behind behaviour change initiatives.

Staff from KVH and a wide range of primary sector, and industry groups, took part in the workshop.

Dr McKenzie Mohr’s ideas about identifying barriers to behaviour change and developing community-based social marketing initiatives to overcome those barriers, can be applied to strategic biosecurity initiatives.

Engaging with a wide range of audiences, from across a broad section of communities is a fundamental part of KVH and the kiwifruit industry’s work.

When we think of current examples like the ongoing management of the Psa disease, or raising awareness about the importance of good biosecurity practice year-round, the learnings from the workshops will help organisations and leaders within the industry understand the challenges and trends related to how people make behavioural choices and where they prefer to get their information.

We have a very clear direction and goal – a biosecurity team of 4.7 million people. We need to be responsive to peoples changing needs so that we’re providing them with the information they want, when they want it, in a way that encourages them to take part in the biosecurity related actions we’re asking of them.

If there are barriers in the way, we need to make changes to the way we do things and find more effective ways of interacting. That may mean changing from the more traditional approach of newspaper ads or printed brochures, to being at more face-to-face community events so we can get direct feedback from people.

Biosecurity News
23 March 2017
Keep the reports coming
23 March 2017
We often get phone calls and emails from members of the public and growers who think they may have found a pest or bug from our most unwanted list. This is a good thing – it’s exactly the...
Keep the reports coming
23 March 2017

We often get phone calls and emails from members of the public and growers who think they may have found a pest or bug from our most unwanted list. This is a good thing – it’s exactly the type of behaviour we want to see as it shows people are on the lookout and aware of not just biosecurity risk in general, but also of the look and size of the organisms that are considered the highest risk to the kiwifruit industry.

A lot of people are on orchards for harvest at this time of the year so we’re getting an increased number of reports – six so far this week infact. They have all turned out to be native brown soldier bugs which are very similar but can be differentiated because they’re much smaller.

The message remains the same for growers, contractors and anyone else on-orchard: stay vigilant, be on the lookout, and report anything unusual. Please take a photo (very rarely will we need to see the actual specimen) of what you find and send it to us at info@kvh.org.nz so we can have a look at it for you. Don’t be afraid to report any suspect finds – the sooner you alert us the more we can do to help.

Grower News
23 March 2017
Free wall calendar
23 March 2017
It’s March already but there are still plenty of school and public holidays to come …. don’t forget you can get a handy wall calendar free from us for your office or...
Free wall calendar
23 March 2017

It’s March already but there are still plenty of school and public holidays to come …. don’t forget you can get a handy wall calendar free from us for your office or home.

Produced by KVH and the Tauranga port community, the calendar includes loads of helpful images and a quick and easy reference guide to unwanted pests and diseases, their risk months, where and how they are most likely to enter New Zealand and where you should lookout for them.

We’ve got a few left so please send us an email letting us know how many you would like and where we should send them to. For a better view (or to print a copy yourself) click here.

Grower News
23 March 2017
Working proactively with MPI to manage risk
23 March 2017
Effectively managing the risk of an invasive hitchhiker pest like BMSB requires all parties in the biosecurity system to be involved in delivering pre-border, border and post border...
Working proactively with MPI to manage risk
23 March 2017

Effectively managing the risk of an invasive hitchhiker pest like BMSB requires all parties in the biosecurity system to be involved in delivering pre-border, border and post border interventions.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has been engaging with a number of stakeholders, including KVH, to manage the risk of BMSB entering New Zealand.

An update on these activities, focused on pre-border and border initiatives is now available on the KVH website​.

This includes pre-shipment treatment requirements, awareness activities with major shippers and interventions.

Media Releases
13 March 2017
Kiwifruit industry signs agreement to fight pest threats
13 March 2017
Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Inc has signed an agreement with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to help reduce the damaging impacts of the four most common biosecurity threats to the kiwifruit...
Kiwifruit industry signs agreement to fight pest threats
13 March 2017
Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Inc has signed an agreement with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to help reduce the damaging impacts of the four most common biosecurity threats to the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors.

The operational agreement under the Government Industry Agreement for Biosecurity Readiness and Response (GIA) was finalised today in Wellington. It sets out the contractual arrangements of how industry and Government will work together to manage potential pests.
 
"This means the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors and MPI can work together to manage and help reduce the impact of a number of pest threats on our sector, which has exports of almost $2 billion per year," said KVH CEO, Barry O’Neil.  
 
"There are a number of biosecurity threats facing our industry. The Psa incursion which impacted us from 2010 cost the kiwifruit industry $1 billion. With the signing of this agreement we have committed to doing everything we can to stop another Psa-type event from occurring.”
 
The agreement establishes the operational details for readiness and response activities and cost-sharing arrangements, to deliver better biosecurity outcomes for the kiwifruit sector. It includes the roles and responsibilities of all the parties, including how joint activities will be cost shared. The GIA partnership currently has 14 partners from across Government and the wider primary sector, who have agreed to work together to jointly manage biosecurity threats.
 
“The GIA partnership welcomes the signing of this agreement as a positive step forward for both Government and the kiwifruit sector,” said GIA Secretariat Manager, Steve Rich.
 
“This agreement provides a prime example of how biosecurity will come to be managed in New Zealand under GIA – with industry and the Crown working together to achieve the best possible outcomes.”
 
The agreement covers the four most common threats to the kiwifruit sector, and other pests and pathogens can be added to the agreement as they are identified. Signatories to the agreement include Kiwifruit Vine Health Inc (on behalf of the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors) and the Ministry for Primary Industries on behalf of the Crown).
 
The kiwifruit and kiwiberry sector operational agreement is the second of its kind. The first agreement was the multi-sector agreement for the management of fruit fly in New Zealand and agreements for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) are currently in development. Over time, further operational agreements for specific biosecurity threats, and sectors represented under GIA, will be executed between the partners to GIA.
 
Biosecurity News
9 March 2017
Japan update: biosecurity similarities
9 March 2017
On a recent trip back to New Zealand, Zespri’s Japan supply manager Bryan McGillivray shared insights on the spread of Psa and other unwanted pests in Japan with Zespri colleagues and...
Japan update: biosecurity similarities
9 March 2017

On a recent trip back to New Zealand, Zespri’s Japan supply manager Bryan McGillivray shared insights on the spread of Psa and other unwanted pests in Japan with Zespri colleagues and KVH.

Bryan said, since Psa3 (the previously called Psa-V) arrived in Japan in 2014, it developed and spread through the Japanese kiwifruit industry as it did here. Climatic differences such as Japan’s hotter summers had reduced the pace of the spread of Psa somewhat. Of Japan’s 2,177 hectares of kiwifruit, around 69% is now infected with Psa3.
 
As in New Zealand, Hort16A has been most affected by the Psa and blocks are being removed as they become uneconomic. Southern areas of Japan remain free of Psa and movement controls are in place to help protect orchards.
 
Some potential biosecurity threats to New Zealand are already present in Japan providing an opportunity to learn how growers manage these pests and what else should be on our radar as emerging risks to our industry. The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one such example, a pest of significant concern to us, yet in Japan where it is native, impacts do not seem to be significant.
 
This is thought to be because the samurai wasp is also native to Japan, and parasitises BMSB eggs keeping populations in check. The good experience from Japan tells us this could be an effective control tool to have so KVH and other horticultural industries are seeking pre-approval to release the samurai wasp as a biocontrol agent should BMSB ever establish here. 
 
KVH has an information-sharing relationship with Bryan’s team in Japan, which will ensure both organisations stay abreast of pest developments and potential new research opportunities across the two countries.    
 
Grower News
9 March 2017
Preparing for the next biosecurity incursion at an on-orchard level
9 March 2017
The threat of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) highlighted in recent Bulletin articles, has reinforced the risk of biosecurity incursions to the kiwifruit industry.    KVH is working...
Preparing for the next biosecurity incursion at an on-orchard level
9 March 2017
The threat of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) highlighted in recent Bulletin articles, has reinforced the risk of biosecurity incursions to the kiwifruit industry. 
 
KVH is working with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and other horticultural sectors to prepare specifically for BMSB, but we also have efforts under way within our own industry to ensure that we are prepared for the next biosecurity incursion - whatever this might be.
 
A key component of this is to ensure that the industry is managing our internal pathways with on-orchard biosecurity practices. To achieve this an industry working group, including growers and the wider industry, met again Tuesday to further progress the development of industry on-orchard biosecurity guidelines.
 
KVH Biosecurity Analyst Matt Dyck says the group was originally created by KVH to ensue key partners are involved in the creation of the guidelines, which will provide consistency across the industry and provide guidance as to the level of business-as-usual good biosecurity practice required. 
 
“Biosecurity puts growers investment at risk – in terms of dollar value, jobs, and community impact. It’s imperative we manage that risk and protect growers through awareness, education and operational guidelines.”
 
“Draft guidelines were presented to the group for discussion, including what supporting documents and tools will be needed to help with implementation, and therefore improve ability to withstand a future biosecurity incursion.”
 
“We received a lot of good feedback about the guidelines and posters we’ve already created, particularly around how practical they are. The workshop also raised some useful ideas about how we can make them even more fit-for-purpose for growers, packhouses and wider audiences.”
 
Next week KVH will work with other primary industries to align our approach and explore how a community-based approach can strengthen on-orchard and on-farm biosecurity.
 
Grower News
9 March 2017
Nursery plants
9 March 2017
KVH have had instances where growers/nurseries have not followed the correct procedures and plants moved illegally have had to be destroyed.   All growers and all nurseries must meet Kiwifruit...
Nursery plants
9 March 2017
KVH have had instances where growers/nurseries have not followed the correct procedures and plants moved illegally have had to be destroyed.
 
All growers and all nurseries must meet Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) requirements and must follow the movement controls when sourcing/providing plants.
 
There are three options for sourcing plants:
 
KPCS “Full Certification” plants
Fully certified plants that meet all testing requirements for all target organisms.
Movement: Can be moved between regions in accordance with KVH movement controls below.
 
KPCS “within Region Only” plants
Plants that meet all KPCS requirements except freedom from Psa-V. 
Movement: Movement is restricted to within the same KVH Biosecurity region.
* Plants may not be moved from a positive property to a Not Detected property.
 
Grow for your own use
Growers may produce plants for use on their own properties.
Movement:  Movement of no more than 1000 plants per year is permitted to properties under the same ownership, within the same KVH Biosecurity region, and subject to certain biosecurity controls.
* Plants may not be moved from a positive property to a Not Detected properly.
Biosecurity News
9 March 2017
Report suspected finds
9 March 2017
Remember, there are only small market access implications from Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) but the production impact is vast. The sooner you alert us, the more we can do to help you. Early...
Report suspected finds
9 March 2017

Remember, there are only small market access implications from Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) but the production impact is vast. The sooner you alert us, the more we can do to help you. Early detection is key to eradication – if we don’t report and miss this window BMSB could be a challenge we have to deal with forever.

Please keep an eye out for any unusual pests and call us on 0800 665 825 or send us photographs to info@kvh.org.nz if you find anything of concern. An updated fact sheet on BMSB can be found on the KVH website.
 
Grower News
9 March 2017
Zespri roadshow presentation highlights early detection importance
9 March 2017
KVH Chief Executive Barry O’Neil, along with other KVH staff, presented at the Zespri roadshows last week.     Barry provided a Psa update, focussed on recent discoveries of Brown...
Zespri roadshow presentation highlights early detection importance
9 March 2017
KVH Chief Executive Barry O’Neil, along with other KVH staff, presented at the Zespri roadshows last week.  
 
Barry provided a Psa update, focussed on recent discoveries of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and the vigilance needed to ensure early detection.
 
He also touched on the risk of fruit flies and successful management of White Peach Scale risks.
 
We featured the BMSB in the last special edition of the Bulletin – read more here about why BMSB is a serious pest and recent interceptions by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).
 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz