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R&D News
15 June 2017
Fresh research added to KVH website
15 June 2017
Research supports the value of applying winter coppers in managing Psa. A research project has determined the source of leaf inoculum in Hayward from bud-break to senescence and shows Psa can be...
Fresh research added to KVH website
15 June 2017

Research supports the value of applying winter coppers in managing Psa.

A research project has determined the source of leaf inoculum in Hayward from bud-break to senescence and shows Psa can be found on both the outside of winter buds and within the buds themselves as they expand in Spring. Read more here.

In a linked project, molecular tools detected overwintering Psa on kiwifruit vines and quantified levels of inoculum before and after application of winter copper sprays. Copper was shown to reduce the overwintering Psa inoculum load on the vines. This research shows winter coppers reduce populations of Psa that we cannot see but which we know contribute to the Psa disease cycle. Read more here.

Research backing kiwifruit management strategies.

Two further reports added to the KVH website this week illustrate the value of research in improving understanding of orchard management best practice.

A pre-flower girdling study showed girdling vines 30 days before flowering resulted in significantly less bud rot than in non-girdled vines. This was the case for both Hayward and Green 14 vines. The research also found Psa to be the dominant microbial species and most likely cause of infected buds. Read more here.

In a study to better understand how root pruning may impact vine susceptibility to Psa, metabolites found in leaves following root pruning were studied. Increased concentrations of procyanidin metabolites were seen and further work is under way to see if this is part of a disease response within the vine.  This response is similar to that observed by others studying metabolic responses of plants to stress. Read more here. 

Biosecurity News
15 June 2017
Dutch kiwifruit grower reaches out for Psa assistance
15 June 2017
The Netherlands’ first kiwifruit grower has reached out to the New Zealand industry for advice in dealing with possible Psa symptoms. Multi award-winning Dutch businesswoman and...
Dutch kiwifruit grower reaches out for Psa assistance
15 June 2017

The Netherlands’ first kiwifruit grower has reached out to the New Zealand industry for advice in dealing with possible Psa symptoms.

Multi award-winning Dutch businesswoman and horticulturalist Djûke van der Maat grows half a hectare of northern Italian variety Greenlight and Tomori male at her family’s 28-hectare diversified farm in Bunnik, The Netherlands.

Djûke is a participant in this year’s Rabobank Global Farmer Master Class programme alongside grower Trish Jones. When Djûke discovered red exudate and shoot and cane wilt, she contacted Trish and her husband Paul for advice. They provided support and approached KVH and respected growers for additional information and insight.

The affected vines were immediately removed. KVH provided information on copper products and best practice. As the orchard was close to flowering, a low rate copper spray was advised. However implementation of the suggested products is difficult, because of availability and application regulations.

Test results are due back from a laboratory next week. Three weeks prior to discovery of the symptoms, the area had been hit by a severe frost. Temperatures on the site dropped to -7 degrees Celsius. Djûke uses frost pots but it is likely there was a degree of frost damage and some of those New Zealand growers who have been talking to Djuke thought there was a chance the frost could be to blame for the symptoms. Djûke is still hopeful that frost may turn out to be the cause. 

Biosecurity News
15 June 2017
KVH presents to Maori Kiwifruit Grower Forum
15 June 2017
Yesterday the Maori Kiwifruit Grower Forum was officially launched to advocate on behalf of these growers and ensure they are well informed of key issues. Biosecurity is one such issue and KVH...
KVH presents to Maori Kiwifruit Grower Forum
15 June 2017

Yesterday the Maori Kiwifruit Grower Forum was officially launched to advocate on behalf of these growers and ensure they are well informed of key issues.

Biosecurity is one such issue and KVH presented to the group to seek their support in our bid for Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval to release a biocontrol agent, should one day the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) establish in New Zealand.

BMSB is a significant threat to kiwifruit and horticultural industries given that it is highly likely to enter our borders and establish here, causes significant impacts to horticultural industries and also to the public by infesting their homes, and is extremely difficult to control requiring frequent applications of toxic insecticides.

However, in countries where BMSB is native, a biocontrol exists that keeps BMSB populations in check by parasitising their eggs. This is the Samurai midge (Trissolcus japonicus) which has been the subject of intense research and host testing in both New Zealand and the USA to determine its suitability as a biocontrol agent. This process is nearly complete and we hope to have an EPA decision by September of this year. 

Biosecurity News
15 June 2017
BMSB readiness update
15 June 2017
While a biocontrol agent is considered the most effective control tool against Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), KVH is also working closely with Zespri to ensure that we are doing everything we can...
BMSB readiness update
15 June 2017

While a biocontrol agent is considered the most effective control tool against Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), KVH is also working closely with Zespri to ensure that we are doing everything we can across the supply chain to reduce the impact of this pest.

KVH and Zespri have established a working group to progress a Kiwifruit BMSB Readiness Plan. This plan identifies activities to mitigate impacts of BMSB across the supply chain and has an associated workplan to ensure these activities become viable in the near future.

The workplan has been given a high priority in both organisations and the readiness plan is expected to be largely complete with only long-term research and development outstanding, by September this year.

A simulation will be held before the next high-risk period, to test the practicalities of this plan with KiwiNet, our industry biosecurity champions. 

Biosecurity News
15 June 2017
Myrtle rust in Te Puke
15 June 2017
KVH is helping mobilise support for experts determining the extent of the myrtle rust incursion in Te Puke. A Te Puke woman contacted the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to report myrtle...
Myrtle rust in Te Puke
15 June 2017

KVH is helping mobilise support for experts determining the extent of the myrtle rust incursion in Te Puke.

A Te Puke woman contacted the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to report myrtle rust-like symptoms on a ramarama tree on her property.

KiwiNet received a request from AsureQuality and MPI to provide resources to assist with the response in the Te Puke area. We were happy to oblige, had a good response from our networks and were pleased to have been able to provide the resources required.

Myrtle rust is a fungal infection that can travel long distances in the wind and attacks plants of the Myrtaceae family. It doesn’t affect kiwifruit but could affect iconic New Zealand plants like pōhutukawa, kānuka, mānuka and rātā, as well as commercially-grown species such as eucalyptus, guava and feijoa.

Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit vines, growers will want to check any Myrtaceae plants on their property.

Look for:
• bright yellow powdery eruptions appearing on the underside of the leaf (young infection)
• bright yellow powdery eruptions on both sides of the leaf (mature infection)
• brown/grey rust pustules (older spores) which can appear on older lesions
• buckled or twisted leaves which may die off.

If you see any of these symptoms, call MPI immediately on 0800 80 99 66. Take a photo but don’t touch or take samples as this might increase spread of the disease.

This discovery should not impact movement of kiwifruit plants from nurseries unless they are growing or selling myrtle rust host material (Myrtaceae species).  Those nurseries need to follow the myrtle rust protocols for nurseries on the New Zealand Plant Producers Inc (NZPPI) website.

Biosecurity News
14 June 2017
Myrtle rust found in Te Puke
14 June 2017
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has confirmed the presence of the myrtle rust plant disease at a residential property in Te Puke.  A link to MPI’s media release is available...
Myrtle rust found in Te Puke
14 June 2017

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has confirmed the presence of the myrtle rust plant disease at a residential property in Te Puke. 

A link to MPI’s media release is available here.

The property location is not being released publicly, but KVH understands it is close to kiwifruit orchards. In this area, harvest is likely to be complete.
 
Myrtle rust is a fungal infection that can travel long distances in the wind and attacks plants of the Myrtaceae family. 
 
It doesn’t affect kiwifruit but could affect iconic New Zealand plants like pōhutukawa, kānuka, mānuka and rātā, as well as commercially-grown species such as eucalyptus, guava and feijoa.
 
Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit vines this is an important and timely reminder for all growers to look out for symptoms on Myrtaceae trees and shrubs around your orchard and in gardens. 
 
Look for:
  • bright yellow powdery eruptions appearing on the underside of the leaf (young infection)
  • bright yellow powdery eruptions on both sides of the leaf (mature infection)
  • brown/grey rust pustules (older spores) which can appear on older lesions
  • buckled or twisted leaves which may die off
 
If you see any of these symptoms call MPI immediately on 0800 80 99 66. Take a photo but don’t touch or take samples as this might increase spread of the disease.
 
Biosecurity News
1 June 2017
First readiness and response plan under GIA
1 June 2017
KVH has developed a Readiness and Response Plan for Brazilian Wilt (Ceratocystis fimbriata), the first of its kind under the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for Biosecurity Readiness and...
First readiness and response plan under GIA
1 June 2017
KVH has developed a Readiness and Response Plan for Brazilian Wilt (Ceratocystis fimbriata), the first of its kind under the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for Biosecurity Readiness and Response.
 
Brazilian Wilt is one of Kiwifruit's Most Unwanted and a priority for readiness work by KVH. It’s a fungus with a wide host range and wide geographic and genetic diversity. Non-New Zealand strains (for which this plan was developed) would likely cause significant production impacts to the New Zealand kiwifruit industry.
 
The fungus is present in over 35 countries, including New Zealand, in a wide range of hosts. There is significant uncertainty about which strains present a risk to kiwifruit, where these strains are present and the possible entry pathways.
 
The disease-causing kiwifruit strain in Brazil would likely cause significant production impacts as potentially all kiwifruit cultivars are susceptible. The impact of other strains is unknown. Market access impacts are unlikely for fruit.
 
If Brazilian Wilt is confirmed in kiwifruit, actions to manage the response will follow commitments that have been entered into by KVH - on behalf of industry - and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) under GIA and as per the developed plan.
 
The plan was finalised and formally signed by KVH and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) last Tuesday.
 
Pictured above signing the Brazilian Wilt readiness and response plan are, from left, GIA Partnerships Senior Business Analyst Grant Boston, GIA Partnerships Team Manager Angela Brownie, KVH CEO Barry O’Neil and MPI’s Readiness Group Manager Melanie Russell.
Grower News
1 June 2017
KVH at Fieldays
1 June 2017
Barry and the team will be stationed in the Zespri tent at the National Fieldays at Mystery Creek, Hamilton, on Wednesday, June 14, Thursday, June 15 and Friday, June 16. Zespri will host a lunchtime...
KVH at Fieldays
1 June 2017
Barry and the team will be stationed in the Zespri tent at the National Fieldays at Mystery Creek, Hamilton, on Wednesday, June 14, Thursday, June 15 and Friday, June 16. Zespri will host a lunchtime presentation to growers from 12pm each day, where KVH and NZKGI will also speak. Please come and visit the KVH stall for a chat at any point throughout the day – we would be keen to discuss any questions, issues or suggestions you may have about biosecurity.
Grower News
1 June 2017
Hawkes Bay grower meeting
1 June 2017
All growers are urged to attend.   When:      Tuesday 6 June at 4pm Where:     Duke Hotel, 389 Gloucester Street, Taradale   KVH is reviewing the Hawkes Bay...
Hawkes Bay grower meeting
1 June 2017
All growers are urged to attend.
 
When:      Tuesday 6 June at 4pm
Where:     Duke Hotel, 389 Gloucester Street, Taradale
 
KVH is reviewing the Hawkes Bay regional classification to determine if it should change the Hawke’s Bay from a Containment to a Recovery region and is seeking input from growers in the region. Staff from KVH will be presenting at the meeting on what a change in status would mean for the region and is seeking grower feedback.
 
Please take the opportunity to attend and ensure you have an opportunity to contribute to this important discussion.
Grower News
1 June 2017
Remove all unpicked fruit from vines and help protect our Industry
1 June 2017
Growers are reminded of the importance of removing unpicked kiwifruit, including any arguta variety, from vines following harvest.  Fruit left on vines ripens and softens over winter months,...
Remove all unpicked fruit from vines and help protect our Industry
1 June 2017

Growers are reminded of the importance of removing unpicked kiwifruit, including any arguta variety, from vines following harvest.  Fruit left on vines ripens and softens over winter months, allowing birds such as white-eyes or sparrows to feed on the fruit and spread the vine’s seeds through their droppings. This exacerbates the establishment of wild vines, especially where orchards are adjacent to native bush, scrub or forestry blocks.

 
More than $300,000 is invested in wild kiwifruit control annually and we still do not have control over the problem. Contractors in the Bay of Plenty control an average of 11,000 wild vines yearly.  There are increasing reports of wild kiwifruit recorded in the Gisborne and Nelson-Tasman regions, but wild vines can establish wherever kiwifruit is grown.
 
Rules in the National Psa-V Pest Management Plan include the requirement that fruit is removed from vines by 1 July each year. If fruit remains unpicked, it should be dropped to the ground as soon as possible and mulched so that the fruit pulp composts. This avoids any situation of fruit remaining on vines and accessible to birds, resulting in more wild vines.
 
KVH will be following up on any reports of unpicked orchards, or areas within orchards.
Grower News
1 June 2017
Psa risk is high
1 June 2017
Winter is here, bringing cold conditions and plenty of rain - both of which increase the risk of Psa infection and spread. This Whangarei weather station image emphasises this change, predicting...
Psa risk is high
1 June 2017
Winter is here, bringing cold conditions and plenty of rain - both of which increase the risk of Psa infection and spread. This Whangarei weather station image emphasises this change, predicting severe Psa risk for the area throughout the coming week. Heightened risk is also currently predicted for Northland, Gisborne and Hawke’s Bay.
 
All growers should ensure full winter rate coppers are applied, as soon as possible after harvest, to protect fruit stalk wounds and leaf scars through this high-risk period. Include spreaders to improve coverage of these difficult targets and, where leaf condition remains strong, application of Actigard is also recommended. A second application of Actigard can be applied to blocks which harvested early if leaf condition is still strong. Take care to avoid drift to unharvested fruit and wash out spray tanks and spray lines thoroughly to avoid the risk of contamination.
 
In frosted areas or where vines have begun to shut down, ensure further copper is applied as leaves continue to fall. Remember late season canopies are difficult targets and impossible to cover with a single spray. Change direction of sprayer travel in consecutive spray rounds to help improve coverage.
 
Pay special attention to high-risk areas of the orchard, such as those with high levels of leaf spotting through spring, or areas where you have previously cut out infection. Areas with new plantings or newly-grafted blocks also need excellent protection through this period.
Grower News
1 June 2017
Budwood movement
1 June 2017
Budwood movement will be a focus for many suppliers and growers at this time of year, particularly to those cutting over to new licences and those with new plantings.   As budwood poses the...
Budwood movement
1 June 2017
Budwood movement will be a focus for many suppliers and growers at this time of year, particularly to those cutting over to new licences and those with new plantings.
 
As budwood poses the highest risk of disease transfer, please remember:
 
  • Use the cleanest source of budwood and from your own orchard where possible.
  • Budwood suppliers must be registered with KVH and supply a copy of their Psa-V Risk Management Plan.
  • Growers must only obtain budwood from a KVH-registered supplier.
  • Budwood movement must comply with the controls outlined in KVH Protocol: Budwood.
  • Movement of Gold3 budwood also requires Zespri authorisation.
  • Budwood movement from Psa-V positive orchards is allowed in Recovery regions only. Please note, movement between Psa-V positive orchards between Recovery regions is subject to KVH authorisation and this may be withheld if alternative lower risk options are available.
  • For ‘not detected’ orchards, monitoring, sampling and testing must occur within six weeks of budwood collection.
  • Budwood collection area is to be sprayed with copper within four weeks of collection.
  • Maintain tool hygiene and sanitisation.
  • Records of budwood supplied and received must be maintained and kept with grower GAP records.
If you are unsure of the movement controls or have any queries, please contact KVH on 0800 665 825 or email info@kvh.org.nz

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz