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Biosecurity News
30 May 2019
Help lookout for wild kiwifruit vines
30 May 2019
As we head into winter, growers are asked to look out for wild kiwifruit vines in any areas of bush, scrub or forestry near kiwifruit orchards.  Wild vines can harbour pest organisms, degrade...
Help lookout for wild kiwifruit vines
30 May 2019

As we head into winter, growers are asked to look out for wild kiwifruit vines in any areas of bush, scrub or forestry near kiwifruit orchards. 

Wild vines can harbour pest organisms, degrade the biodiversity value of bush and productive value of forestry. They are at their most visible in early winter when leaves turn from green to yellow.  

Growers can report wild kiwifruit locations to their local regional council or KVH by emailing info@kvh.org.nz.

A reminder as published in the last Bulletin, that unpicked kiwifruit must be removed from vines by 1 July. Read more here. 

Biosecurity News
30 May 2019
Beetle to control the weed moth plant
30 May 2019
The moth plant beetle, an organism new to New Zealand, can now be used in the fight to control moth plant. In mid-May the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) approved an application by Waikato...
Beetle to control the weed moth plant
30 May 2019

The moth plant beetle, an organism new to New Zealand, can now be used in the fight to control moth plant.

In mid-May the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) approved an application by Waikato Regional Council to import the beetle. Read more about the EPA decision and process here.

Moth plant is a problem weed on many kiwifruit orchards, especially from the Bay of Plenty north. It infests shelter belts, slows down hedge trimmers and is a major host of Passionvine hopper. 

The moth plant beetle feeds on moth plant foliage but this damage is not usually significant.  Eggs are laid on or in the ground around the base of the stem and hatching larvae burrow down to feed on moth plant roots.  The beetle is specific to moth plant and will not attack kiwifruit or any other orchard plants.  

This approved biocontrol agent will hopefully assist in the long-term control of moth plant – in the meantime orchardists should maintain removal programmes, especially as it is a weed often smothered with Passionvine hopper.  It is a poisonous plant, the sap may cause severe dermatitis through any skin contact, so PPE must be worn when removing this plant. 

The most effective control method is to dig plants out of the shelter belt, being careful to remove all of the roots.  Alternatively, the plant can be killed with herbicide: cut the vine to within 20cm of ground level and carefully apply one-part glyphosate to five parts water, plus a sticker such as Pulse, to the vine base.

Biosecurity News
30 May 2019
First-hand lesson from visiting BMSB expert
30 May 2019
Experience from countries where the invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is present is highly valuable to the kiwifruit industry, and New Zealand, in preventing and controlling any potential...
First-hand lesson from visiting BMSB expert
30 May 2019

Experience from countries where the invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is present is highly valuable to the kiwifruit industry, and New Zealand, in preventing and controlling any potential BMSB outbreaks.

KVH yesterday attended a Plant & Food Research-run presentation by Professor Claudio Ioriatti, a world-renowned expert on BMSB, who shared useful knowledge from the European BMSB control effort.

As Director of the Technology Transfer Centre in Italy, Professor Ioriatti has been touring New Zealand meeting with key groups involved in improving New Zealand’s readiness for BMSB. His presentation included an update on the European Union’s progress in BMSB control and outlined the general impacts of BMSB in Italy and the EU, the current situation, impacts on horticulture, and Integrated Management Strategies such as the use of netting and biocontrol options, as well as insecticides.

Information sharing like this, builds on the knowledge KVH, Zespri, MPI and the kiwifruit industry can use as we continue to formulate short and long-term plans for how we would respond to and manage a BMSB incursion on our orchards. Read the BMSB Readiness Plan (A) for information about how the industry is ready for a New Zealand incursion. Read the BMSB Readiness Plan (B) for information about long term management considerations should BMSB establish in New Zealand.

In August 2018 the New Zealand horticulture industry welcomed the Environmental Protection Authority’s (EPA) decision allowing the release of a tiny Samurai Wasp into New Zealand, if ever there was an incursion of the BMSB. Read the media release here.

Biosecurity News
30 May 2019
Keep NZ free from stink bug winter woes
30 May 2019
We may be out of the high-risk season for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) but that’s no reason to stop being on the lookout. KVH and other horticultural groups are working together again...
Keep NZ free from stink bug winter woes
30 May 2019

We may be out of the high-risk season for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) but that’s no reason to stop being on the lookout.

KVH and other horticultural groups are working together again this year on keeping the BMSB profile up over the winter months. Online and social media advertising are being used to help get the message out about the lifestyle impacts of this unwanted pest, the fact it hibernates inside homes over the winter, can infest homes in the thousands and is almost impossible to get rid of.

Company Notices
30 May 2019
Visit us at Fieldays
30 May 2019
Come along and see us in the Zespri hub at the National Fieldays at Mystery Creek, Hamilton, Wednesday 12 June to Friday 14 June. Pop in and visit the KVH stall for a chat – we’re keen...
Visit us at Fieldays
30 May 2019

Come along and see us in the Zespri hub at the National Fieldays at Mystery Creek, Hamilton, Wednesday 12 June to Friday 14 June.

Pop in and visit the KVH stall for a chat – we’re keen to discuss any questions, issues, or suggestions you have about biosecurity. We’ll also be presenting between 12.00 and 12.30pm each day as part of the Zespri programme which includes a seasonal update, news from NZKGI and a lunchtime sausage sizzle.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Biosecurity News
30 May 2019
New inflight video to educate visitors about biosecurity
30 May 2019
A new inflight biosecurity video will remind international travellers about the importance of protecting New Zealand from unwanted pests and diseases. The video will play to arriving passengers on...
New inflight video to educate visitors about biosecurity
30 May 2019

A new inflight biosecurity video will remind international travellers about the importance of protecting New Zealand from unwanted pests and diseases.

The video will play to arriving passengers on all airlines with screen capacity.

All visitors to the country and kiwis returning home can help protect New Zealand from harmful pests and diseases. The new in-flight video provides a clear message about what everyone’s responsibilities are when arriving here. The simple lesson is, if you're unsure about an item you’ve got – declare it.

There are two versions of the video – one spoken in English and one for Chinese airlines in Mandarin. The English version has been translated into 12 different languages, including Hindi, Malay, Arabic, Korean and French. It has also been translated into Bilsama, a national language in Vanuatu spoken by many seasonal workers.

The video is part of a wider national programme focused on protecting New Zealand and supports the biosecurity movement Ko Tātou This Is Us which highlights the personal connection we all have to the land, rivers, lakes and sea that nourish and provide for us.

Watch the English version here, or the Mandarin version here.

Biosecurity News
30 May 2019
Tool hygiene and supervision important through pruning
30 May 2019
KVH this week visited a Gold3 orchard with multiple plants showing Psa infection symptoms both above and below autumn applied girdles. Vines had been girdled for the first time ever in January,...
Tool hygiene and supervision important through pruning
30 May 2019

KVH this week visited a Gold3 orchard with multiple plants showing Psa infection symptoms both above and below autumn applied girdles.

Vines had been girdled for the first time ever in January, with the girdle re-opened in February. Copper was applied to girdles in January; in February no copper was applied, though girdles were taped to assist healing.

The pattern of infection within blocks suggested poor girdling technique and lack of tool hygiene are likely to have been factors leading to vine infection - grower survey found that for some rows, 50% of plants were affected.

This result is disappointing and a reminder that wounds are potential infection points for Psa. Research (available on the KVH website) has shown unprotected girdles can be infected for at least 15 days after the girdle is applied, and infection generally follows specific high-risk weather patterns.

Similar risk should also be considered when planning pruning rounds. As pruning commences, make sure winter rate copper is applied ahead of and after pruning. Insist on good tool hygiene and team supervision to make sure your rules are being followed.

Check the Psa risk model to help with spray and pruning planning.

Protocols & Movement Controls
16 May 2019
Budwood registration and supply
16 May 2019
KVH best practice advice is to source budwood from your own orchard wherever possible to reduce the likelihood of spreading Psa or other pathogens. If this is not possible, the growers who are...
Budwood registration and supply
16 May 2019

KVH best practice advice is to source budwood from your own orchard wherever possible to reduce the likelihood of spreading Psa or other pathogens.

If this is not possible, the growers who are supplying budwood off their orchard need to register annually with KVH and complete a Budwood Risk Management Plan.

Requirements for budwood suppliers are detailed in the KVH Protocol: Budwood, and include a requirement to monitor the budwood collection area and tag any vines that are showing any symptoms or are not healthy.

Budwood should not be collected from material left on the ground after pruning as this may mean that wood from unhealthy vines is distributed to other orchards, resulting in disease transfer.

It is important to maintain traceability - growers need to record all material moving off and onto their orchard. This will help with disease or pest containment in the event of a new incursion.  

Protocols & Movement Controls
16 May 2019
Movement of mature plants
16 May 2019
Growers may wish to move mature kiwifruit plants from areas where they have double planted. The movement of plant material is considered a high-risk pathway for the transmission of unwanted...
Movement of mature plants
16 May 2019

Growers may wish to move mature kiwifruit plants from areas where they have double planted.

The movement of plant material is considered a high-risk pathway for the transmission of unwanted organisms and therefore it is important that any such movements are given careful consideration and that appropriate measures are implemented to mitigate risk.

Please contact KVH (0800 665 825 or info@kvh.org.nz) well in advance if you wish to move any mature kiwifruit vines between properties.

Biosecurity News
16 May 2019
Stinky pest thwarted
16 May 2019
The BMSB Council (a group of horticulture-wide organisations who have come together to help stop the damaging hitchhiker making a home here) have reminded the public of the production and lifestyle...
Stinky pest thwarted
16 May 2019

The BMSB Council (a group of horticulture-wide organisations who have come together to help stop the damaging hitchhiker making a home here) have reminded the public of the production and lifestyle impacts of BMSB and the work being done to keep it from establishing here.

The Council – which includes KVH – released a media statement outlining the significant progress industry groups and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) have made towards mitigating the potential catastrophic damage of a BMSB incursion, reminding people to be on the lookout over the winter months, and encouraging public reports of anything unusual.

Read the release here. 

Biosecurity News
16 May 2019
Snakes on a plane: flying snake, live python caught at border
16 May 2019
A flying snake and carpet python were among the rising number of reptiles that biosecurity staff seized at our borders. This included two of the world's most poisonous snakes – a tiger...
Snakes on a plane: flying snake, live python caught at border
16 May 2019

A flying snake and carpet python were among the rising number of reptiles that biosecurity staff seized at our borders. This included two of the world's most poisonous snakes – a tiger snake and a banded sea krait – along with different species of lizards and a turtle. Read more.

Biosecurity News
16 May 2019
Step-up in Northcote fruit fly response
16 May 2019
On Saturday it was announced another Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) has been found within the current Northcote controlled area, bringing the total to eight over the past three and half...
Step-up in Northcote fruit fly response
16 May 2019

On Saturday it was announced another Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) has been found within the current Northcote controlled area, bringing the total to eight over the past three and half months.

Biosecurity New Zealand is stepping up on the ground efforts in the suburb, including placing bait on fruit trees to attract and kill adult flies, in particular females. The current restrictions on the movement of fruit and vegetables remain in place and trapping and the collection of fallen fruit in some of the controlled area will continue.


While it is concerning there has been another detection, it still doesn’t tell us that there is a breeding population. What it does is raises the potential that QFF remain in the area, albeit at very low levels.

KVH continues to be closely involved in the running of the response as a member of the decision-making Governance Group, and as an industry we continue to help with on the ground activities via the KiwiNet group.

Read the full announcement from Saturday here.

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Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz