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22 March 2019
Auckland fruit fly response
22 March 2019
Regular situation updates about the 2019 fruit fly response in Auckland are available here. Information about fruit flies, including restrictions on moving and selling fruit and vegetables, and...
Auckland fruit fly response
22 March 2019

Regular situation updates about the 2019 fruit fly response in Auckland are available here. Information about fruit flies, including restrictions on moving and selling fruit and vegetables, and Export Restricton Zones, is available here.  


Controls on the movement of fruit and vegetables in the Auckland suburbs of Devonport and Otara are being lifted after no further fruit fly have been found there.

The decision follows several weeks’ of intensive trapping and inspections of hundreds of kilograms of fruit leading to the conclusion that there are no breeding populations of Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) in the Devonport area, or Facialis fruit fly in Otara.

Legal controls were placed on the movement of fruit and vegetables in Devonport after a single male QFF was identified from a national surveillance trap on Thursday 14 February. There have been no further finds in Devonport. Similar controls were placed in Otara after a male facialis fruit fly was found there on Monday 18 February. There were two further finds in separate response surveillance traps nearby where the first detection was.

To date no further adult fruit flies, eggs, larvae or pupae have been found. With no further detections, the Controlled Area Notices can be lifted today.

As a precautionary measure, an enhanced network of fruit fly traps in Devonport and between Devonport and Northcote will remain in place, as well as in Otara, for an extended period. If fruit flies are present, these traps will detect them. Signage and wheelie bins will be removed from the two suburbs over the next few days.

The restrictions in place on the movement of fruit and vegetables and the current baiting programme in Controlled Zones in the North Shore suburb of Northcote remain in place. The last QFF detection there was on Thursday 14 March. Teams on the ground have been removing fallen fruit from backyards, inspecting compost bins, and placing bait on fruit trees to attract and kill adult flies, in particular females. The bait is made up of a protein to attract adult fruit flies, and a very low concentration of insecticide to kill the flies. The baits are toxic to fruit flies but are safe around people and animals.

Summary of finds: Single male QFF have been found in separate surveillance traps in the Auckland North Shore suburbs of Devonport (one single fly) and Northcote (six single flies over an extended period of time). Three Facialis flies have been found in Otara.

More information: Read more about fruit flies and the remaining restrictions on the movement of fruit and vegetables here.

Biosecurity News
21 March 2019
Auckland fruit fly detections update
21 March 2019
Two further male Queensland Fruit Flies (QFF) were found in Northcote last week, bringing the total to six. One of the new finds was inside the current Zone A and the other was in Zone B. The latest...
Auckland fruit fly detections update
21 March 2019

Two further male Queensland Fruit Flies (QFF) were found in Northcote last week, bringing the total to six. One of the new finds was inside the current Zone A and the other was in Zone B.

The latest finds mean an expansion of Zone A in Northcote and associated restrictions on the movement of fruit, vegetables and green waste. It also means an increase in operational response activities. Teams on the ground have been removing fallen fruit from backyards, inspecting compost bins and placing bait on fruit trees to attract and kill adult flies, in particular females.

The bait is made up of a protein to attract adult fruit flies and a very low concentration of insecticide to kill the flies. It’s similar to how people bait wasps in their backyards. The baits are toxic to fruit flies. Every precaution is taken to make sure the baits are safe around people and animals.

There have been no further finds of QFF in Devonport since the only find there on Thursday 14 February. However, because of the proximity to Northcote, movement controls and trapping have continued – this will reconsidered within the next few days.

No further Facialis fruit fly have been found in Otara (three in total have been found here).

Kiwifruit growers should talk to their post-harvest providers if they have any questions about what the impacts to them might be due to movement controls or export restrictions.

If you require support you can contact NZKGI or visit their website to learn more about the support network available.

·         Read more about the Controlled Area Notices and Export Restriction Zones 

·         Find out more about the QFF and see photos

·         Find out more about the Facialis fruit fly and see photos

Biosecurity News
21 March 2019
Latest unwanted finds
21 March 2019
The latest fruit fly and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) risk updates have been published on the KVH website. As well as the finds in Auckland, the fruit fly update details detections at the...
Latest unwanted finds
21 March 2019

The latest fruit fly and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) risk updates have been published on the KVH website.

As well as the finds in Auckland, the fruit fly update details detections at the border, the national fruit fly surveillance programme, and recent international responses to this unwanted pest.

The BMSB update includes latest interception and surveillance information, and an update about ongoing work alongside Australian officials to align activities.

KVH risk updates are published every month.

Biosecurity News
21 March 2019
Biosecurity training piloted
21 March 2019
A small group of around 20 came together at a trial workshop last week to learn more about the importance of on-orchard biosecurity and how good plans can manage the threat posed by unwanted...
Biosecurity training piloted
21 March 2019

A small group of around 20 came together at a trial workshop last week to learn more about the importance of on-orchard biosecurity and how good plans can manage the threat posed by unwanted biosecurity threats.

A mix of growers, crop monitoring and management staff, biosecurity personnel, and technical advisors from across the kiwifruit and avocado industries took part in discussions about practical actions and concepts that can be put in place day-to-day to monitor, assess, and mitigate risk.

Participants worked through how to develop their own biosecurity best practice checklist detailing what they currently do, what could be done better, and the priority for implementing improvements, including thinking about how to incorporate biosecurity activity in to systems already in place (for Health & Safety for example) instead of creating new ones.

Pilot workshops are based on the biosecurity micro-credential programme and are taking place across horticulture. The Primary Industry Training Organisation (ITO), together with the horticulture industry, has developed the micro-credential - a short, focused piece of learning - to enhance industry biosecurity capability. It covers biosecurity principles, on-farm practices, and an assessment component, and has been developed under the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) framework, targeting grower owner-operators and supervisors/managers. 

Company Notices
21 March 2019
We're on the move
21 March 2019
It’s all go in the KVH office at the moment as we prepare for our big shift to the new Zespri premises where we will be located from Monday 1 April. If you’re popping in to meet with us...
We're on the move
21 March 2019

It’s all go in the KVH office at the moment as we prepare for our big shift to the new Zespri premises where we will be located from Monday 1 April.

If you’re popping in to meet with us you’ll see our reception area at our new street address, 25 Miro Street (the back of the Zespri building, near the corner of Matai St).

All our other address details remain the same, as do our contact phone numbers.

Biosecurity News
21 March 2019
Samurai Wasp says 'smell ya later, stink bug'
21 March 2019
We came across a new and interesting video last week about Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and the biological control option provided by the Samurai Wasp. Made by a science education website in...
Samurai Wasp says 'smell ya later, stink bug'
21 March 2019

We came across a new and interesting video last week about Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and the biological control option provided by the Samurai Wasp.

Made by a science education website in the USA, the video explains (with fantastic, close-up video footage) the damage BMSB can do to crops and homes. The video and accompanying article also describe the work underway by scientists in Oregon – where the Samurai Wasp has settled – to learn more about how they can be used as a biocontrol tool.

In August 2018, the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) made a formal decision approving the release of the tiny Samurai Wasp into New Zealand, if ever there is an incursion of BMSB. Permission to release the wasp is subject to a number of strict controls that will dictate when, where, and by whom it can be released. Read more about the application made to the EPA and the Samurai Wasp on the KVH website here.

Biosecurity News
21 March 2019
Keep the reports coming
21 March 2019
We often get phone calls and emails from growers and members of the public who think they may have found an unusual disease symptom, or a pest from our most unwanted list. This is a good thing...
Keep the reports coming
21 March 2019

We often get phone calls and emails from growers and members of the public who think they may have found an unusual disease symptom, or a pest from our most unwanted list.

This is a good thing – it’s exactly the type of behaviour we want to see as it shows people are on the lookout and aware of not just biosecurity risk in general, but also of the look and size of the organisms that are considered the highest risk to the kiwifruit industry.

With the recent fruit fly detections in Auckland and a lot of people on orchards for harvest, we’re getting an increased number of reports and emails almost every day (thankfully, they’ve all been of things that are either native and or established and not of any further concern).

The message remains the same for growers, contractors and anyone else on-orchard: stay vigilant, be on the lookout, and report anything unusual. Please take a photo (very rarely will we need to see the actual specimen) of what you find and email us so we can have a look at it for you, or use the new Find-A-Pest App that is currently being trialled.

Recent reports of unusual symptoms reported and investigated to KVH are also available online. This information is provided to help growers identify similar symptoms they may be seeing on their own properties.

Don’t be afraid to report any suspect finds – the sooner you alert us the more we can do to help.

Biosecurity News
7 March 2019
Fruit fly detection update
7 March 2019
Yesterday it was announced that a fourth male Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) has been found in Northcote and another Facialis fruit fly has been found in Ōtara. The Northcote find is approximately 80...
Fruit fly detection update
7 March 2019

Yesterday it was announced that a fourth male Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) has been found in Northcote and another Facialis fruit fly has been found in Ōtara.

The Northcote find is approximately 80 metres inside the current A Zone and no further restrictions on the movement of fruit and vegetables are required in the suburb.

The Ōtara find is 630 metres to the north of the last find inside the current B Zone. Another A Zone has been established in Ōtara, which will mean restrictions on a different area. The current B Zone is unchanged. 

Similar controls on the movement of export fruit to those put in place in Northcote will be established in Ōtara. This is expected to have little, if any, practical impact on fruit exports.

There have been no further finds of QFF in Devonport since the only find there on Thursday 14 February.

The extensive surveillance programme is continuing including trapping, visual inspection of backyard gardens and fruit trees, and collection and laboratory examination of fallen fruit. The kiwifruit industry, through KiwiNet, has made a huge contribution to this work. To date there has been around 300kg of fruit cut and examined, which was gathered from A Zone backyards on the North Shore, and almost 500kg in Otara. There has not been any fruit fly larvae found.

KVH is part of the Fruit Fly Council - a governance group made up of impacted industry sector representatives and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) under the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) partnership. We are closely involved in response decision-making processes, ensuring the interests of kiwifruit growers, and other primary producers, are represented fully.

The responses in Otara, Devonport, and Northcote are running well and are following the pre-agreed operational plans established and tested in previous responses. The kiwifruit industry can be confident that the work being undertaken is in the best interests of our growers as everything possible is being done to determine whether there are more flies in the area, and if so, stop them from spreading any further.

Despite the recently announced additional finds, there is no evidence of a breeding population and that is good news that can give us continued confidence in our biosecurity system, as well as the response actions taken so far.

KVH and the Fruit Fly Council have been clear from the outset that each find is a concern and there is full support for MPIs recently announced independent review of the air passenger, cruise and mail pathways. There will always be some risk of unwanted pests and diseases getting here, but we must do everything possible to try and stop them. If there are any holes in the system currently, they need to be found and immediately fixed.

Detailed maps of the controlled areas, a description of the boundaries, and full information about the rules are available on the MPI website.

Summary of detections: Single male QFF have been found in separate surveillance traps in the Auckland North Shore suburbs of Devonport (one single fly) and Northcote (four flies). Three male Facialis fruit flies have been found in separate surveillance traps in Ōtara.

The most likely way that fruit flies can arrive in New Zealand is in fresh fruit and vegetables. Be vigilant and keep watch. While it may be possible to find on fruit trees if present, a better option is to look out for any larvae in fruit, including tree fallen fruit. Report anything of concern to the pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66.

Protocols & Movement Controls
7 March 2019
Post-harvest biosecurity for packhouses
7 March 2019
The post-harvest protocols have been updated for 2019 and are now available on the KVH website. Any changes to Biosecurity Risk Management Plans must be signed off before harvest commences this...
Post-harvest biosecurity for packhouses
7 March 2019

The post-harvest protocols have been updated for 2019 and are now available on the KVH website. Any changes to Biosecurity Risk Management Plans must be signed off before harvest commences this season. Please email karyn.lowry@kvh.org.nz  your amended plans or any questions.

All bins in all regions must be clear of plant material and sanitised pre-season and between orchards. For sanitiser options refer to the KVH information sheet.

There are additional requirements for post-harvest operators moving bins between Recovery and Containment regions. Refer to the KVH Protocol: Fruit Bins for more information.  Notification to KVH is required before the first movement of any harvest bins from Recovery regions into Whangarei.

Biosecurity News
7 March 2019
Free biosecurity course
7 March 2019
You’re invited to take part in a biosecurity workshop next Tuesday 12 March – it’s free and part of the new micro-credential programme across horticulture, offering learnings about...
Free biosecurity course
7 March 2019

You’re invited to take part in a biosecurity workshop next Tuesday 12 March – it’s free and part of the new micro-credential programme across horticulture, offering learnings about what risks are present on orchards and how to prioritise and manage them.

We’re seeking individuals who are either grower owner-operators or in managerial/supervisor positions to participate in the programme. Individuals will be required to actively participate in the pilot course, and then undertake an assessment component on biosecurity practices on their orchards to be awarded the micro-credential.

Read more here and email info@kvh.org.nz to register.

Biosecurity News
7 March 2019
Latest BMSB finds
7 March 2019
Since the start of the high-risk season in September 2018, there have been 173 live Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) finds in association with goods or people entering New Zealand or post border. To...
Latest BMSB finds
7 March 2019

Since the start of the high-risk season in September 2018, there have been 173 live Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) finds in association with goods or people entering New Zealand or post border. To date none of these have led to the establishment of BMSB here. More detail can be read in the new risk update (for February) now available on the KVH website.

The update includes latest data reported by Biosecurity New Zealand and information about activities involving KVH to make sure that everything possible is being done to prepare for and respond to BMSB.

The risk period for BMSB stretches throughout the summer so remember to be on the lookout and report anything unusual. Information and videos about the risks this bug poses are available on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
7 March 2019
Welcome overseas workers, not their hitchhiking mates
7 March 2019
As the kiwifruit industry gears up for harvest, and the corresponding annual influx of overseas workers, it’s time to consider the risk to the biosecurity of our industry presented by overseas...
Welcome overseas workers, not their hitchhiking mates
7 March 2019

As the kiwifruit industry gears up for harvest, and the corresponding annual influx of overseas workers, it’s time to consider the risk to the biosecurity of our industry presented by overseas workers - or more accurately - their clothing, footwear and tools.

There are many biosecurity threats present in other growing regions around the world that are not here in New Zealand, and which could have a devastating impact on our industry. The soil-borne Brazilian Wilt has caused up to 50% vine loss on Brazilian kiwifruit orchards over recent years and the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) continues to wreak havoc across Europe and the USA. Close to home, there have been several biosecurity investigations after detections of BMSB and fruit flies in Auckland, and a lone BMSB found in Mount Maunganui in December.

·        Make overseas workers aware of the need for excellent orchard hygiene.

·        Make sure they do not bring tools used overseas onto your orchard.

·        Check their footwear was cleaned and sanitised in their home country or at the border – don’t take any chances.  

It’s important that you don’t allow any imported fruit to come on to your orchard. If you see or hear of someone that has accidently bought fruit or vegetables into New Zealand make sure it is reported to Biosecurity New Zealand and then appropriately destroyed by being bagged and put in the rubbish, not composted.

To assist with this, KVH has developed a best practice poster to help reduce biosecurity risk from someone who has recently visited another country or worked on an offshore orchard or farm; showing what items need to be cleaned before packing luggage and why; and to explain what people can expect at border control when arriving in New Zealand.

You can download and print the poster, or contact KVH if you’d like us to print a larger size for you, your orchard, workplace or staffroom.

Keep an eye out for any unusual symptoms on your vines. If you observe any sudden vine wilt contact us immediately. We have great links to Biosecurity New Zealand and can quickly distinguish the unusual from the ordinary. We are always keen to hear from anyone who may have concerns.

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Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz