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Grower News
30 November 2017
Grower presentation: keeping our border secure
30 November 2017
What’s happening at the border? Are we doing everything we can to keep unwanted pests and diseases out of the country? Growers are invited to attend a KVH-hosted presentation by Ministry for...
Grower presentation: keeping our border secure
30 November 2017

What’s happening at the border? Are we doing everything we can to keep unwanted pests and diseases out of the country?

Growers are invited to attend a KVH-hosted presentation by Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) Border Clearance Director Steve Gilbert, who will be discussing initiatives underway to ensure New Zealand’s border space keeps up with the ever changing - and increasing – biosecurity risks we face.

Steve will talk about how MPI’s border surveillance systems work and provide updates about the trends being seen in the passenger, mail, and cargo pathways of entry to New Zealand.

This presentation will also give growers an opportunity to learn more about MPI’s national strategic direction for biosecurity, and how the kiwifruit industry is involved through KVH initiatives such as incursion exercises; research projects; and events like the recent Biosecurity Week at the Port of Tauranga.

Seats are limited and only a small number of places are available, which will be confirmed on a first in-first serve basis. Growers wishing to attend must register with KVH by next Wednesday.

What: Border presentation from Steve Gilbert, MPI
When: Wednesday 13 December 2017, 1.00pm – 1.45pm (before the separate KVH KiwiNet meeting begins)
Where: Classic Flyers, 9 Jean Batten Drive, Mount Maunganui
RSVP: Email KVH by Wednesday 6 December

 

Grower News
30 November 2017
Hill Laboratories have moved
30 November 2017
Hill labs have moved from their four Hamilton sites onto a single site. This move has been a significant investment in the future of the business, which Hills says will also bring more efficiencies...
Hill Laboratories have moved
30 November 2017

Hill labs have moved from their four Hamilton sites onto a single site. This move has been a significant investment in the future of the business, which Hills says will also bring more efficiencies for growers.

Psa samples should now be sent directly to the new lab at 28 Duke Street, Frankton, Hamilton, 3204.

With the upcoming Christmas holiday period, the last date for samples arriving in the lab will be Friday 15 December 2017. Testing will resume Monday 8 January 2018.

Only KVH pre-arranged testing will be accepted between these dates. Please contact Karyn Lowry on 027 227 1157 if urgent Psa testing is required between 18 December and 5 January. Photos of symptoms will be required. We anticipate these will only be from areas currently free of Psa (i.e. South Island).
 

Biosecurity News
30 November 2017
Psa effects to lessen over summer
30 November 2017
This spring has proven to be a difficult one for Psa on many sites across all growing regions with KVH still receiving reports of ongoing symptoms in Gold3.  For some sites cankers remain...
Psa effects to lessen over summer
30 November 2017

This spring has proven to be a difficult one for Psa on many sites across all growing regions with KVH still receiving reports of ongoing symptoms in Gold3. 

For some sites cankers remain active and collapsed canes and leaders continue to be removed. More Gold3 orchards have reported leaf spotting this year also, with many noticing increased flower abortion adjacent to these areas. Vines with root systems compromised by very wet weather or younger vines have been more affected.

Images from KVH visits to orchards this week are available here.

Symptoms are expected to reduce significantly as temperatures increase heading into summer. Similarly, for Hayward, Psa effects should reduce as the weather warms – the dry weather through Hayward pollination has been welcome.

Going forward, growers are reminded of the importance of continuing Psa protection and should use the KVH Psa Risk Model as a guide to upcoming high-risk weather. Also, choose dry weather for spring trunk girdling, male pruning and catch up canopy management or thinning rounds. Be sure to maintain tool hygiene between plants and bays.

KVH continues to visit and support growers seeing symptoms that appear quite different from previous years and growers are urged to contact KVH with any concerns about symptom levels seen this year or any unexplained vine symptoms.
 

Biosecurity News
30 November 2017
Latest BMSB finds and data
30 November 2017
Since the start of the high-risk season in September, there have been 26 Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) found at the border. More detail can be read in the November KVH Risk Update for BMSB,...
Latest BMSB finds and data
30 November 2017

Since the start of the high-risk season in September, there have been 26 Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) found at the border.

More detail can be read in the November KVH Risk Update for BMSB, which includes latest data reported by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and information about activities involving KVH to make sure that everything possible is being done to prepare for, and respond to BMSB.

The risk period for BMSB stretches throughout the summer so remember to be on the lookout and report anything unusual. Information and videos about the risks this bug poses is available on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
30 November 2017
Myrtle rust - what you need to know
30 November 2017
As we head in to summer the weather is warming up and conditions are improving. Symptoms of myrtle rust are becoming more prevalent with the increasing temperatures, and detection of new infections...
Myrtle rust - what you need to know
30 November 2017

As we head in to summer the weather is warming up and conditions are improving. Symptoms of myrtle rust are becoming more prevalent with the increasing temperatures, and detection of new infections is as important as ever to help build a big picture of spread.

Late last week the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) confirmed the disease had been found for the first time in Auckland, on a commercial plant property in Waimauku. Earlier this week a second find in Auckland was also confirmed, bringing the total of known infected locations to 136, including 37 non-commercial properties in Te Puke.

MPI is focusing surveillance efforts in the areas where myrtle rust is known to be present. In the Taranaki region, surveillance has extended out to the Controlled Area boundary. The Department of Conservation (DOC) is also undertaking surveillance in targeted areas in other parts of the country, which is expected to be complete by the end of the month. To date, no myrtle rust has been found on any Public Conservation Land checked by the survey parties.

There is specific information and recommendations for specific groups, including home gardeners, nursey owners, and beekeepers, on the MPI website. 

KVH, and Zespri, have been in regular discussion with MPI to ensure there is clear advice available to beekeepers. MPI’s position is that beehive movements do not pose a significant risk to the spread of myrtle rust and as such there are no restrictions on movement in place. We support this position.

However, beekeepers should speak with landowners about moving bees from myrtle rust areas to areas with no myrtle rust.

Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit plants or vines, you may see it on other plants on your orchard or home garden (there haven’t been any detections of myrtle rust on feijoa plants). If you find it, don’t touch it – take a photo and call MPI on 0800 80 99 66.

A free app has also been created so people can quickly and easily let officials know if they suspect they’ve found symptoms. Myrtle Rust Reporter can be used for observing and mapping common host plants that may be susceptible to the fungus, getting assistance from others to confirm identifications, and making reports.

Be on the lookout for big yellow powdery eruptions on either or both sides of the leaf; brown/grey rust pustules (older spores) which appear on older lesions; and buckled or twisted leaves which may die off.

Good hygiene practices should always be followed to help manage biosecurity threats, particularly the KVH hygiene recommendations.  Plant material, vehicles, people and equipment can carry pests and diseases. Restrict access to orchards and ensure visitors, harvest staff, and contractors know and follow your hygiene requirements.

Company Notices
30 November 2017
Consultation process for biosecurity funding
30 November 2017
KVH has attended grower roadshows presenting a proposal for future funding of biosecurity activities. Copies of the roadshow presentation, detailed background information, and helpful frequently...
Consultation process for biosecurity funding
30 November 2017

KVH has attended grower roadshows presenting a proposal for future funding of biosecurity activities.

Copies of the roadshow presentation, detailed background information, and helpful frequently asked questions and answers about the proposal, are available on the KVH website.  The questions and answers have been put together based on the queries that were raised at roadshow meetings.

KVH has been consulting with growers because the funding mechanisms of KVH were originally established for Psa and are now out of date based on the serious nature of the biosecurity risks we face and the need to be able to immediately respond in the event of an incursion as part of our commitment to working with government under Government Industry Agreements (GIA).

KVH members have already agreed to a biosecurity levy of 1 cent per tray in 2018.  But, 1 cent is the maximum rate of the current levy order and it will not be enough to fund the response costs of a serious incursion. The proposal to address this is to increase the ceiling of the levy to 5 cents a tray, so that the KVH Board (in consultation with industry) can activate the full levy to fund future incursions. 

The proposal will next be presented to IAC on Friday 8 December.

Based on all the feedback received, KVH will then decide as to whether to formally request an increase to the Minister for Biosecurity, or not.  

We welcome your feedback on the proposal, which can be emailed to KVH at info@kvh.org.nz or if you have any questions, please feel free to contact us on 0800 665 825.
 

Biosecurity News
30 November 2017
More biosecurity fines
30 November 2017
KVH was pleased to read an announcement from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) earlier this week about the hard line they are taking on arriving air passengers who fail to declare items that...
More biosecurity fines
30 November 2017

KVH was pleased to read an announcement from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) earlier this week about the hard line they are taking on arriving air passengers who fail to declare items that could bring unwanted pests or diseases into the country.

So far this year MPI has issued more than 9,100 biosecurity infringements and given over 1,000 warnings to passengers for failing to follow biosecurity rules. This is quite an increase on previous years, and the numbers will likely go up a lot after the busy summer season.

KVH backs the tough stance being taken on people that put New Zealand, and our primary industries, at risk.

Everyone in the kiwifruit industry has to play their part to help manage biosecurity risks when importing or travelling. KVH has produced a guide for kiwifruit growers to help reduce biosecurity risk after travelling (especially if an offshore orchard of farm has been visited) and to explain what growers can expect at the border when coming back to New Zealand.
 

Company Notices
16 November 2017
General meeting to liquidate the KVH Foundation
16 November 2017
Kiwifruit Vine Health Incorporated and the KVH Foundation Incorporated now operate as one entity under the Government Industry Agreement (GIA). The Minister for Primary Industries approved the...
General meeting to liquidate the KVH Foundation
16 November 2017

Kiwifruit Vine Health Incorporated and the KVH Foundation Incorporated now operate as one entity under the Government Industry Agreement (GIA).

The Minister for Primary Industries approved the application late March 2017, which confirmed and completed the legal requirements of moving to a single legal entity - Kiwifruit Vine Health Incorporated - to represent the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors from 1 April 2017.


As such, the KVH Annual General Meeting in August resolved to liquidate the Foundation and a subsequent Special General Meeting is being held to confirm the resolution. All members are welcome to attend the meeting.

What: Special General Meeting with the intention to wind up the KVH Foundation Incorporated by passing the required confirming resolution.

When: Tuesday 12 December, 8.30am (prior to the NZKGI Forum meeting).

Where: Club Mount, 45 Kawaka Street, Mount Maunganui.

Company Notices
16 November 2017
Nuffield scholarship awarded to KVH Board member
16 November 2017
KVH congratulates Board member Simon Cook on his recent Nuffield Scholarship award. The Nuffield Scholarship is a prestigious award in the primary sector. It has been awarded to New Zealand...
Nuffield scholarship awarded to KVH Board member
16 November 2017

KVH congratulates Board member Simon Cook on his recent Nuffield Scholarship award.

The Nuffield Scholarship is a prestigious award in the primary sector. It has been awarded to New Zealand agricultural leaders for more than 60 years and provides a 12-month scholarship programme with up to 20 weeks spent overseas, allowing participants to observe and learn about global agricultural practices. 

Simon has been a Grower Director on the KVH Board since being elected at the August 2016 AGM and has governance roles with several other kiwifruit organisations including being a supply entity director, vice president of the Te Puke Fruit Growers Association, and a member of NZKGI’s executive committee.

KVH Board Chair Adrian Gault said that in the time Simon has been on the KVH Board he has demonstrated leadership and commitment to the kiwifruit industry, which will benefit further from the knowledge he gains through this award. 

Biosecurity News
16 November 2017
Nasty weed re-emerges in the Bay of Plenty
16 November 2017
A Maketu, Bay of Plenty, orchard manager is working closely with the Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC) and their contractor to eradicate a weed which produces hundreds of extremely sharp...
Nasty weed re-emerges in the Bay of Plenty
16 November 2017

A Maketu, Bay of Plenty, orchard manager is working closely with the Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC) and their contractor to eradicate a weed which produces hundreds of extremely sharp seeds, able to penetrate footwear and vehicle tyres.

Native to South Africa, Spiny Emex (Emex australis) has been present in New Zealand for more than 100 years but has remained very localised to parts of the Bay of Plenty, Gisborne and Hawkes Bay.  It typically grows on light, sandy soils in coastal areas. 

Spiny Emex appears similar to a small-leaved dock.  The three-cornered seeds are formed at the base of leaves and along leaf stems.  They are extremely sharp.

The Maketu kiwifruit orchard was badly infested after an area of soil was moved into hollows when the orchard was developed. BOPRC contractors and orchard staff have been intensively digging out and destroying plants, and more than a tonne of fresh plants have now been removed. 

Orchard staff check their footwear before leaving the orchard. Contractors and staff carefully check the tyres of vehicles.

KVH visited the site this week and was impressed by the dedication of the orchard manager, working with BOPRC, to ensure that everything possible is being done to prevent any further spread of this weed.

If you live in the Bay Of Plenty and think you have seen Spiny Emex on any site, or any kiwifruit orchard, contact 0800 STOP PESTS (0800 786 773) or email BOPRC. If you’ve seen the weed in any other area, contact your local regional council or KVH.

Biosecurity News
16 November 2017
Kiwifruit fungal pathogen workshop
16 November 2017
A biosecurity incursion of a fungal pathogen such as Brazilian Wilt (Ceratocystis fimbriata), could severely impact our kiwifruit industry as it has to growers in Brazil where kiwifruit may no longer...
Kiwifruit fungal pathogen workshop
16 November 2017

A biosecurity incursion of a fungal pathogen such as Brazilian Wilt (Ceratocystis fimbriata), could severely impact our kiwifruit industry as it has to growers in Brazil where kiwifruit may no longer be an economically viable crop.

Kiwifruit has been identified as one of the most susceptible crops to this pathogen which is spreading around the world and a number of new epidemics have appeared in the last 10 years, including on Hawaii where it is wiping out their native ‘ōhi’a tree, a close relative to our pōhutakawa.

While KVH leads industry preparedness for biosecurity threats, Zespri provides a significant financial contribution to research initiatives and manages a biosecurity research portfolio on our behalf.

Last week, KVH held a science workshop to identify research priorities for our most significant fungal pathogens, to be undertaken within this biosecurity research portfolio. The workshop was attended by 25 representatives from KVH, Zespri, B3, Plant & Food Research, Landcare Research, Scion, NZ Avocados and the Ministry for Primary Industries.

Some of the key points from the day that will be of interest to growers include:

  • Brazilian Wilt (Ceratocystis fimbriata) –  the kiwifruit industry has already invested more than $200k into research to improve our preparedness for this pathogen, including pathogenicity screening of cultivars and the development of diagnostic tools, in addition to other work funded elsewhere. However, there are still many fundamental knowledge gaps, such as how long does it take from when a vine is infected to when symptoms are expressed? Could the pathogen already be in New Zealand but not yet expressing symptoms? Is kiwifruit susceptible to Ceratocystis strains in Hawaii as well as those in Brazil? And what about strains in Indonesia, Oman, China etc? From a long list of questions, the group workshopped a priority list that will be used to shape research projects for the next financial year.

  • Verticillium Wilt – In Chile, certain kiwifruit cultivars seem susceptible to Verticillium Wilt. Several New Zealand scientists have visited the region to better understand the pathogen that causes this. The development of a diagnostic tool to firstly determine if it is already present in New Zealand (and if not, detect it should it arrive) was agreed as a research priority for this pathogen.

  • Phytophthora – Rebecca Ganley, a Phytophthora expert from Scion, stated that Phytophthora around the world are evolving and we are constantly seeing new diseases from these pathogens. Just over 10 years ago there were no foliar Phytophthora on Radiata pine trees, now there are three, thought to have been a case of the pathogen evolving to infect new hosts.

    In New Zealand, Phytophthora typically affects only kiwifruit vines in poor growing environments or under stress, but observations from other industries suggest that new aggressive strains could affect vines even in good soil types. There are thought to be around 30 Phytophthora species in New Zealand, and several hundred offshore, potential many more that we don’t know of.

The group agreed that the workshop was an effective way of bringing the science community together to discuss research needs for the kiwifruit industry, and a similar approach will be taken for other groups of threats such as insects, viruses and bacteria.

Company Notices
16 November 2017
Put your feedback forward for future biosecurity funding
16 November 2017
Information sent to growers about a proposal regarding the future funding of biosecurity readiness and response activities is available on the KVH website, including answers to frequently asked...
Put your feedback forward for future biosecurity funding
16 November 2017

Information sent to growers about a proposal regarding the future funding of biosecurity readiness and response activities is available on the KVH website, including answers to frequently asked questions about the proposal, and a copy of the presentation being discussed in detail at upcoming grower roadshows. 

KVH is accountable for mitigating numerous dangerous biosecurity threats to the kiwifruit industry, such as the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), fruit flies and Brazilian Wilt. The list of unwanteds that could impact on our industry if they arrive here reaches over 90, some of which have the potential to reduce OGR’s by 30-50%.

The funding mechanisms of KVH were originally established for Psa and are now out of date based on the serious nature of the biosecurity risks we face and the need to be able to immediately respond in the event of an incursion as part of our commitment to working with government under Government Industry Agreements.

KVH members have already agreed to a biosecurity levy of 1 cent per tray in 2018.  But, 1 cent is the maximum rate of the current levy order and it will not be enough to fund the response costs of a serious incursion. The proposal to address this is to increase the ceiling of the levy to 5 cents a tray, so that the KVH Board (in consultation with industry) can activate the full levy to fund future incursions. 

Based on the feedback received about the proposed levy change, KVH would then decide as to whether to formally request an increase to the Minister for Biosecurity, or not.  

We welcome your feedback on the proposal. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact KVH on 0800 665 825 or by email at info@kvh.org.nz. 

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Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz