Search Site

Newsroom

Print these articles
Company Notices
9 July 2020
New Hawke's Bay Regional Coordinator
9 July 2020
KVH welcomes new Regional Coordinator Gaz Ingram, who will be working with Hawke’s Bay kiwifruit growers, offering  support to help manage and reduce further spread of Psa, and build...
New Hawke's Bay Regional Coordinator
9 July 2020

KVH welcomes new Regional Coordinator Gaz Ingram, who will be working with Hawke’s Bay kiwifruit growers, offering  support to help manage and reduce further spread of Psa, and build awareness of other pest and disease risk in the region.

Gaz has been involved in the horticulture industry since 1996 (growing conventional and organic apples in the Hawke’s  Bay) and has been with Farmlands the last eight years, working with organic and biological/regenerative growers across multiple crop types and growing systems.

His strong connection to the horticulture industry is amplified by previous positions within industry groups
such as the Hawke’s Bay Fruitgrowers Association, Soil and Health and current Director position at BioGro NZ, the nation’s leading organic certification business.

Supporting growers is a key focus for both KVH and all Regional Coordinators, who are available whether
seeking technical advice, pastoral support, or general information about biosecurity preparedness. Gaz’s
contact details, and those for all Regional Coordinators are available
here.

KVH thanks Campbell Tacon for his efforts in the role over the last two years and wishes him well in his consultant and orchard management roles.

Company Notices
9 July 2020
KVH director nominations closing soon
9 July 2020
A reminder that the KVH Board is calling for nominations for one grower director for a term of three years as Simon Cook’s term as grower elected representative is ending (Simon will be...
KVH director nominations closing soon
9 July 2020

A reminder that the KVH Board is calling for nominations for one grower director for a term of three years as Simon Cook’s term as grower elected representative is ending (Simon will be re-standing for this vacancy).

Nomination forms can be downloaded from the KVH website here and must be returned to KVH along with a list of all interests in the kiwifruit industry by 5pm Tuesday 21 July 2020.

Grower members will be asked to vote for their preferred nominee and the successful candidate will be announced following the upcoming AGM on Tuesday 18 August 2020 (featuring a special presentation from guest speaker Ian Proudfoot, head of Agribusiness at KPMG) – read more about the event here.

Biosecurity News
9 July 2020
KPCS nurseries come together
9 July 2020
More than 20 nurseries were represented alongside KVH last week at a forum to strengthen communication and partnership with nurseries who are part of the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme...
KPCS nurseries come together
9 July 2020

More than 20 nurseries were represented alongside KVH last week at a forum to strengthen communication and partnership with nurseries who are part of the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS).

There were several informative presentations during the event, as well as discussions and feedback opportunities, particularly related to planned enhancements of the KPCS so that it aligns well with the proposed new Pathway Management Plan and Plant Production Biosecurity Scheme.

Growers should have confidence that kiwifruit nurseries are effectively and efficiently managing the biosecurity risks associated with kiwifruit rootstock movement through their compliance with the KPCS. Other industries also have similar schemes in place, with their growers recognising the value of certified plants.

Fundamental to the KPCS, and a cornerstone of biosecurity across the entire kiwifruit industry, is sourcing and tracking clean plant material - one of the five key steps within the Kiwifruit Growers Biosecurity Guidelines.  Growers can reduce risk associated with plant material by following movement controls, inspecting all material when it arrives on the orchard, and keeping up to date records, particularly maintaining traceability – i.e. where plants (and budwood) went on the orchard. A template and check sheet for this are included within the guidelines (Step 3).

Biosecurity News
9 July 2020
Biosecurity tops business priority list again
9 July 2020
Biosecurity has retained the number one ranking in KPMG’s annual Agribusiness Agenda priorities survey for the tenth year in a row. KPMG’s Head of Agribusiness, Ian Proudfoot –...
Biosecurity tops business priority list again
9 July 2020

Biosecurity has retained the number one ranking in KPMG’s annual Agribusiness Agenda priorities survey for the tenth year in a row.

KPMG’s Head of Agribusiness, Ian Proudfoot – who we are lucky enough to have giving an exclusive talk at this year’s industry AGMs - said not surprisingly, biosecurity was a top of mind matter for the primary sector leaders who had input into the report. The priority score given to biosecurity increased although it remains below its peak in 2018 at the height of the Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) crisis.

“The impact that COVID-19 has had and will continue to have on people’s lives and the economy has highlighted how exposed we are as a country to an incursion.”

“The point was made by a number of contributors that it is critical we take the learnings from the response to COVID-19 and ensure that these are incorporated into biosecurity incursion readiness plans. While the year has passed without an incursion on the scale of M. bovis, it does not mean the year has been incursion free. There are known threats that have tested our border controls, some of which, like the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, have the potential to create significant environmental and economic damage if we drop our guard, something we can ill afford given the cost of the COVID-19”.

KVH is collaborating with NZKGI to host Ian Proudfoot as the special guest speaker at this years AGMs. He will expand on the Agribusiness Agenda and talk about the challenges and opportunities brought about by COVID-19 for the kiwifruit industry. The meeting starts at 9am, Tuesday 18 August 2020, at Trustpower Arena – read more here.

Biosecurity News
9 July 2020
Seed campaign kicks off
9 July 2020
Biosecurity New Zealand is running a social media campaign encouraging New Zealanders to buy seeds from local suppliers. Demand for fruit and veggie seeds skyrocketed during the COVID-19 lockdown,...
Seed campaign kicks off
9 July 2020

Biosecurity New Zealand is running a social media campaign encouraging New Zealanders to buy seeds from local suppliers.

Demand for fruit and veggie seeds skyrocketed during the COVID-19 lockdown, leading to increased interest in online providers based overseas – some of whom KVH is aware have been offering varieties of kiwifruit seed for sale. Unfortunately, many seeds purchased online aren’t what they say they are and more importantly do not meet New Zealand’s strict biosecurity rules and could risk introducing a plant disease.

Importing seeds is best left to reputable commercial operators who know what they are doing and are aware of what they must always do to meet the rules (including an import permit; phytosanitary certificate; and post entry quarantine for example). The campaign emphasises the risks and makes it clear that anyone can be prosecuted for bringing, or attempting to bring, unwanted plant species or pests and diseases into New Zealand.

Biosecurity New Zealand enforce all requirements and currently officials are making around 600 seed seizures a week. Any report of kiwifruit plants grown from unapproved seed imports will be investigated. Please contact the pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66 if you are aware of any unapproved kiwifruit seed imports. 

Biosecurity News
9 July 2020
Insights into kiwifruit growers' positivity about biosecurity
9 July 2020
A recent survey of growers and workers in kiwifruit and several other Bay of Plenty industries has affirmed that people are onboard with protecting New Zealand from biosecurity threats and think...
Insights into kiwifruit growers' positivity about biosecurity
9 July 2020

A recent survey of growers and workers in kiwifruit and several other Bay of Plenty industries has affirmed that people are onboard with protecting New Zealand from biosecurity threats and think it’s important everyone plays their part.

The ‘Biosecurity Excellence at the Port of Tauranga’ initiative has been exploring the biosecurity awareness and behaviours of key groups over recent years (because of their connection to the processing and handling of a diverse range of goods through the Port of Tauranga) and a new survey was undertaken a few months ago of four industries in the Bay of Plenty region: kiwifruit, forestry, avocado, and passionfruit.

Pleasingly, the findings – in an easy to read infographic here - suggest that across all four industries, protecting New Zealand from unwanted pests and diseases is extremely important. In detail:

·        there is a perception everyone has a responsibility for biosecurity, and the Ministry for Primary Industries/Biosecurity New Zealand is believed to hold the greatest responsibility, 

·        while growers were seen to hold a high level of responsibility for biosecurity, when asked about biosecurity training, respondents said staff on their orchard or plantation only received a moderate degree of training on how to recognise signs and symptoms of potential biosecurity risks,

·        responses to questions around the existence of biosecurity management plans highlighted that many are tailored to the industry or sector level, rather than to the needs of specific operations, 

·        some key biosecurity practices are undertaken more often than others. Practices related to assessing risks/symptoms on plants or trees were more common (as high as 79.3%) than practices around checking and cleaning vehicles, machinery, and equipment,

·        when asked about barriers to implementing biosecurity practices, respondents indicated that, while there were no major perceived impediments, the greatest barriers related to time, know how, and practicality,

·        industry workers would like more information about the biosecurity risks of not implementing measures, and case studies of how individual growers have benefitted from taking action.

When we look at results for kiwifruit growers specifically, findings differed in that these growers perceived themselves to hold a higher degree of responsibility for biosecurity than those within other sectors. The findings also suggest that people from the kiwifruit industry undergo more biosecurity training and have more site-specific biosecurity plans in place to reduce biosecurity risks. Interestingly, the kiwifruit participants reported that those within their operations routinely check and sanitise tools, but do not routinely check vehicles and machinery. KVH will be working with growers to look further into how and why decisions about this are made.  

From here, the ‘Biosecurity Excellence at the Port of Tauranga’ team will look at how it can help the four industry groups surveyed to:

·        enhance training about recognising the signs and symptoms of potential biosecurity risks, and what to do if something unusual is found,

·        support operations develop site-specific biosecurity management plans that consider the practicality and timing of putting recommended biosecurity practices in place,

·        make use of both best and worst-case scenario case studies for implementing biosecurity practices,

·        increase awareness of how implementing biosecurity measures is linked to a wide range of economic, social, and environmental benefits.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz