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Protocols & Movement Controls
4 April 2019
Reminder to order nursery plants in advance
4 April 2019
When we visit nurseries as part of the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS), we’re reminded of how important it is to nurseries that growers order their plants well in advance. Without...
Reminder to order nursery plants in advance
4 April 2019

When we visit nurseries as part of the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS), we’re reminded of how important it is to nurseries that growers order their plants well in advance.

Without a reliable estimate on anticipated demand for the next season, nurseries take a conservative approach to avoid getting left with unsold stock. Growers should order plants as far in advance as possible – preferably a year – to avoid any shortage in supply.

Additionally, growers must only purchase plants that are KPCS certified. KVH movement controls must be observed. A list of nurseries and their KPCS status is available on the
KVH website.

When it comes to ‘Grow for own use’ a reminder that growers may produce their own plants for use on the same property. There are no restrictions on these plants.

Growers may also produce up to 1,000 plants a year for movement between their own properties within the same KVH kiwifruit growing region. These plants do not need to meet the requirements of the KPCS but any plants being moved between properties must meet some risk management requirements. Growers in this case must complete and submit to KVH a
KVH Psa-V Risk Management Plan - Growing Rootstock for your own use.

Please contact KVH on 0800 665 825 if you would like more information about the requirements.

Biosecurity News
4 April 2019
Help dig out new wood-boring beetle
4 April 2019
The public is being asked to report any sign of the granulate ambrosia beetle. This unwanted pest has been detected in five Auckland areas since 20 February 2019. It is the first time the beetle...
Help dig out new wood-boring beetle
4 April 2019

The public is being asked to report any sign of the granulate ambrosia beetle.

This unwanted pest has been detected in five Auckland areas since 20 February 2019. It is the first time the beetle - regarded as a serious pest overseas - has been found here. Evidence to date suggests it may have been in the country for at least two years. 

Kiwifruit is not known to be a host, but it does feed on a wide range of broadleaf trees and can spread fungal diseases.

Biosecurity New Zealand is currently assessing the potential risk from the beetle and is asking the public to report any possible sightings so that more can be learnt about whether New Zealand has a wider population.

The beetle resides under bark, making it difficult to detect. A tell-tale sign is distinctive protrusions of frass (compacted sawdust) from bark that look like toothpicks. They are caused by the beetles pushing frass out of tunnels bored into the trees. Other symptoms include sap oozing from the tunnel entrances and branch dieback.

Biosecurity New Zealand and local authorities are working together to identify the extent of the spread, inspect known host trees, and place lured traps around the detection sites in Auckland.  Industry groups are also learning more from offshore researchers about risk, containment, and long-term management options. 

KVH is closely following the response and will update growers of any developments that indicate the kiwifruit industry could be impacted by the beetle or pathogens it could spread. 

If you think you may have seen the granulate ambrosia beetle or any sign of frass on trees, take a photo and call Biosecurity New Zealand's exotic pests and diseases hotline on 0800 80 99 66. Read more about the beetle and view the new fact sheet, including images, on the Biosecurity New Zealand website.

Biosecurity News
4 April 2019
No new fruit flies
4 April 2019
Since our last update Friday 22 March, there have been no changes to the Auckland fruit fly response situation, and no further flies have been detected. Importantly, there has not been any evidence...
No new fruit flies
4 April 2019

Since our last update Friday 22 March, there have been no changes to the Auckland fruit fly response situation, and no further flies have been detected.

Importantly, there has not been any evidence of a breeding population found either – that means to date no eggs, larvae, or pupae have been found.

Controls on the movement of fruit and vegetables, and a baiting programme continue in Controlled Zones in Northcote. The last detection there was of a Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) on Thursday 14 March. Teams on the ground have been removing fallen fruit from backyards, inspecting compost bins, and placing bait on fruit trees to attract and kill adult flies, in particular females. The bait is made up of a protein to attract adult fruit flies, and a very low concentration of insecticide to kill the flies. The baits are toxic to fruit flies but are safe around people and animals.

KVH continues to Chair the Fruit Fly Council - a governance group made up of impacted industry sector representatives under the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) partnership - and work alongside Biosecurity New Zealand in this response. We are involved in response decision-making processes ensuring the interests of the kiwifruit industry are represented and we will keep growers updated if there are any new developments.

Kiwifruit growers should talk to their post-harvest providers if they have any questions about what the impacts to them might be due to continued movement controls or export restrictions. If you require support you can contact NZKGI or visit their website to learn more about the support network available.

Summary of finds: Single male QFF have been found in separate surveillance traps in the Auckland North Shore suburbs of Devonport (one single fly) and Northcote (six single flies over an extended period of time). Three Facialis flies have been found in Otara.

More information: Read more about fruit flies and the remaining restrictions on the movement of fruit and vegetables here. 

Biosecurity News
4 April 2019
Top tips for harvest hygiene
4 April 2019
Harvest season presents a high-risk period for spreading Psa or other biosecurity risks between blocks, orchards and regions because of the numbers of vehicles, machinery and people movements...
Top tips for harvest hygiene
4 April 2019

Harvest season presents a high-risk period for spreading Psa or other biosecurity risks between blocks, orchards and regions because of the numbers of vehicles, machinery and people movements involved.

Growers are responsible for protecting their orchards, and others, by ensuring the movement of harvest equipment, people and bins onto and around their orchard is minimised.

Top tips for harvest hygiene:

·         Clear loadout areas of weeds.

·         Clearly mark parking and hygiene control areas.

·         Allow only essential vehicles into the production area.

·         Limit access to established roads and tracks and use free orchard access signs available from KVH or your local pack-house.

·         Make sure contractors and staff understand your hygiene requirements.

·         Check all equipment (harvest bins, harvest machinery, picking bags etc) coming on to your orchard has been cleaned and sanitised, and is free of plant and soil material.

·         Ensure people check that clothing, particularly headwear and footwear, is free of plant material on entry and exit.

·         Do not allow workers to bring imported fruit onto the orchard.

With extra people coming and going through orchards more pairs of eyes can be on the lookout for unusual vine symptoms or pests. Ensure everyone knows to report the unusual to either KVH on 0800 665 825 or Biosecurity New Zealand on 0800 80 99 66.

Biosecurity News
4 April 2019
Harvest hygiene guides online
4 April 2019
As we head into harvest season, a reminder that KVH has biosecurity pocket guides available which have been translated into several languages to promote harvest hygiene messages. These tools are...
Harvest hygiene guides online
4 April 2019

As we head into harvest season, a reminder that KVH has biosecurity pocket guides available which have been translated into several languages to promote harvest hygiene messages.

These tools are quick, step-by-step visual reference guides for use by all growers, on-orchard harvest workers, auditors, transporters, post-harvest and harvest contractors.

Harvest season presents a high-risk period for spreading Psa or other biosecurity risks between blocks, orchards and regions because of the numbers of vehicles, machinery and people movements involved. Everyone in contact with orchards at this time of the year must be fully aware of best practice orchard hygiene.

English | Maori | Hindi | Nepalese | Punjabi | Samoan | Spanish | Thai | Simplified Chinese | Tongan

Biosecurity News
4 April 2019
Last chance for free NZQA biosecurity course
4 April 2019
If you’re in Pukekohe, this is your last chance to attend a free biosecurity micro-credential course. Developed by the Primary ITO and industry, it aims to enhance industry...
Last chance for free NZQA biosecurity course
4 April 2019

If you’re in Pukekohe, this is your last chance to attend a free biosecurity micro-credential course. Developed by the Primary ITO and industry, it aims to enhance industry biosecurity capability, and covers biosecurity principles, on-farm practices, and an assessment component.

Designed for grower owner-operators and supervisors/managers, the NZQA Level 5 course will give you an understanding of biosecurity, risks present on your orchard, how to prioritise and manage them, and how these practices can be put in place or improved.  

As the programme is still being tested with industry groups there is no cost for participating, all materials and catering will be provided.  Participants agree to take part in the course, complete the assessment afterwards, and provide feedback.

The final pilot course will take place in Pukekohe next Monday, 8 April. As there are limited places, please contact Anna Rathé at Horticulture New Zealand to secure your place.

Biosecurity News
4 April 2019
Moderate Psa infection risk predicted
4 April 2019
The Psa Risk Model currently predicts moderate Psa infection risk for next week in most regions. This reflects increased Psa risk with autumn weather and provides a reminder to growers to again...
Moderate Psa infection risk predicted
4 April 2019

The Psa Risk Model currently predicts moderate Psa infection risk for next week in most regions. This reflects increased Psa risk with autumn weather and provides a reminder to growers to again consider Psa management plans, particularly for recently harvested blocks and younger plantings.

For harvested blocks, best practice is to apply a copper product to protect all fruit scars. Winter rates of copper can be applied and Actigard may be added to the tank if there is no risk of spray drift to neighbouring unharvested blocks.

Apply copper alone if there is any risk of drift and then plan to follow up with an Actigard spray when neighbouring blocks have been harvested. Good spray coverage is essential and remember that for Actigard uptake leaves need to be active, so a good cover of green leaves in the canopy is needed. If blocks have suffered extreme drought stress apply copper on its own.

Also a reminder to trim out thick, hairy, late season male growth as this can be highly susceptible to Psa infection in autumn, particularly if frosted. Apply copper after male trimming rounds to protect wounds.

 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz