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Company Notices
28 May 2020
Getting in touch at Alert Level 2
28 May 2020
While New Zealand is at Alert Level 2, KVH staff continue to be available to provide assistance and advice – everyone’s contact details can be found here. As the KVH, NZKGI and Zespri...
Getting in touch at Alert Level 2
28 May 2020

While New Zealand is at Alert Level 2, KVH staff continue to be available to provide assistance and advice – everyone’s contact details can be found here.

As the KVH, NZKGI and Zespri offices on Maunganui Road currently remain closed to visitors please contact us on 0800 665 825 or email info@kvh.org.nz if you think you may need to meet with any of the KVH team in person.

Grower News
28 May 2020
How do you get advice?
28 May 2020
Manaaki Whenua - Landcare Research is conducting a survey on how advice and advisory services are used across the primary sector on behalf of the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), to help...
How do you get advice?
28 May 2020

Manaaki Whenua - Landcare Research is conducting a survey on how advice and advisory services are used across the primary sector on behalf of the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), to help improve services and support for producers and advisors.

The survey covers all types of land-based primary industry including horticulture, viticulture, nurseries, livestock, forestry, growing grain and seed crops.

If you would like to take part, you can access the survey here. To show appreciation for your time, Manaaki Whenua - Landcare Research will donate $10 to the Rural Support Trust for each completed survey, up to $3,000 in total. There are also two $250 grocery vouchers being given away to randomly chosen survey participants.

Biosecurity News
28 May 2020
Keep up with biosecurity when replacing plants or planting new blocks
28 May 2020
Winter is the time when growers look to replace plants on their orchards or plant new blocks. This article is a reminder that if these plants are being moved between properties there are biosecurity...
Keep up with biosecurity when replacing plants or planting new blocks
28 May 2020

Winter is the time when growers look to replace plants on their orchards or plant new blocks. This article is a reminder that if these plants are being moved between properties there are biosecurity requirements that must be met to reduce the likelihood of spreading pests and diseases including Psa.

As a general rule, plants may only be sourced from nurseries that meet the requirements of the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS). There are two types of these nurseries – both are listed on the KVH website.

1.      Full certification plants: these are plants that are free of Psa and other target organisms. Nurseries with these plants have demonstrated the ability to keep Psa out of their growing environment (either through growing in a fully enclosed greenhouse or by being located in an Exclusion region where there is no Psa) and plants have tested Psa Not Detected. 

2.      Restricted certification plants: these are plants that may have the common New Zealand form of Psa (Psa-V) but are free of non-New Zealand and resistant strains of Psa.

The only exception is Grow for Your Own Use, where plants are being grown for use on another property (or properties) under the same ownership within the same Psa region. In this case up to 1000 plants per year can be moved between these properties. Growers using this option must register with KVH and submit a KVH Psa-V Risk Management Plan - Growing Rootstock for your own use.

Plants displaying symptoms are not to be moved and both the nursery and recipient are to maintain traceability records should symptoms develop at a later stage and tracing be required.   

Please contact KVH on 0800 665 825 if you would like more information about the requirements.

Biosecurity News
28 May 2020
Colder temperatures bring higher Psa risk
28 May 2020
Recent cold snaps in most regions have brought welcome winter chill and a good start to leaf drop, but there are also reminders that autumn conditions heighten Psa risk. For some Waikato...
Colder temperatures bring higher Psa risk
28 May 2020

Recent cold snaps in most regions have brought welcome winter chill and a good start to leaf drop, but there are also reminders that autumn conditions heighten Psa risk.

For some Waikato orchards -5 degree frosts were recorded last week, and on Psa challenged blocks this sudden dip in temperature has triggered Psa expression. Exudate from girdles and older cankers flag the need to get winter coppers on to rebuild protection after many months of no sprays. Young plants can also come under pressure during cold periods as described in a recent KVH unusual symptoms report.

Development blocks exposed to frosts or wind need special attention as younger growth remains vulnerable to injury, providing opportunity for Psa entry. Good autumn protection is an important part of year-round management of this disease. Forecast risk of ground frosts can be accessed through the KVH Weather & Disease Portal.

Biosecurity News
28 May 2020
Stink bug in tech winners' sights
28 May 2020
KVH Chief Executive Stu Hutchings was part of the judging panel at this year’s Ag Tech Hackathon, where an innovation and technology company with a track record for coming up with high-tech...
Stink bug in tech winners' sights
28 May 2020

KVH Chief Executive Stu Hutchings was part of the judging panel at this year’s Ag Tech Hackathon, where an innovation and technology company with a track record for coming up with high-tech solutions to industry problems claimed the win for their device that has the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) in its sights.

Their solution, Bugkilla, uses pheromones and light waves to attract BMSB into a chamber. The bug crawls in and a camera identifies if it is a stink bug. If it is, a fan draws the bug up to an electric grating and zaps it then ejects the dead bug.

Farmers Weekly spoke to the winners about their win in the Zespri-funded project, and next steps – which may include KVH as an end-user of potential products that help with the management of this pest, one of the kiwifruit industry’s most unwanted.

R&D News
28 May 2020
Latest research published
28 May 2020
Scientific research publications that drive KVH policies and management advice are added to our website as they are finalised. Growers are encouraged to look them up and have a browse of the many...
Latest research published
28 May 2020

Scientific research publications that drive KVH policies and management advice are added to our website as they are finalised. Growers are encouraged to look them up and have a browse of the many different reports we make available.

The following reports have recently been added to the KVH website:

Cold temperature and frost effects on Psa: This three year project investigated the role of cold temperature and frosts in exacerbating Psa infection in New Zealand kiwifruit orchards. Observations included pre and post frost inoculation of detached canes (HW and Gold3), potted plants exposed to natural frost (HW and Gold3), and potted plants exposed to simulated frost (Gold3 only).

Findings from the work suggest that protecting dormant canes in response to mild frosts (for example by frost protection and/or copper applications) is not necessary, but for frosts below -6 degrees, copper application might reduce Psa infection and it doesn’t matter whether the copper is applied just before or just after a frost event.

Yellow Spotted Stink Bug (YSSB) literature review: Chinese and English databases have been used to source and review publications about YSSB and kiwifruit. The report describes the lifecycle of YSSB, its impacts on kiwifruit and other crops, and potential control options.

Psa biovars literature review: The taxonomy of Psa has been evolving rapidly in recent years. This report reviews the nomenclature associated with Psa and the virulence of different biovars. The ability of a few strains of different biovars to multiply on or in kiwifruit tissues has been reported but as of today there is no study which demonstrates that strains of some biovars are more virulent than others.

Biosecurity News
28 May 2020
Remove unpicked kiwifruit from vines
28 May 2020
Growers are reminded that unpicked kiwifruit must be removed from vines by 1 July. Unpicked fruit can increase the amount of wild kiwifruit plants establishing in nearby areas of native bush or...
Remove unpicked kiwifruit from vines
28 May 2020

Growers are reminded that unpicked kiwifruit must be removed from vines by 1 July.

Unpicked fruit can increase the amount of wild kiwifruit plants establishing in nearby areas of native bush or forestry, as fruit ripening over the winter months provides a food source for birds such as white-eyes. Birds spread seed through their droppings, together with a small fertiliser package. A proportion of this seed can readily germinate.

Unmanaged kiwifruit vines, including those with unpicked fruit, may also be a potential host for plant disease organisms.

Unpicked fruit needs to be dropped to the ground and mulched as soon as possible. This prevents mass-feeding by birds over the entire winter period. It may be necessary to rake the fruit out from beneath leaders to that the mower can mulch all of the fruit.

Under the National Psa Pest Management Plan (NPMP) it is a requirement to remove all unpicked fruit from vines by 1 July each year.  After this date KVH will follow-up reports of unpicked fruit with orchard
owners and post-harvest companies.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz