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Biosecurity News
21 February 2019
Separate fruit fly detections under investigation
21 February 2019
Biosecurity New Zealand announced this morning that surveillance activity in Auckland is being stepped up following the discovery of a second Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) on the North Shore. The...
Separate fruit fly detections under investigation
21 February 2019

Biosecurity New Zealand announced this morning that surveillance activity in Auckland is being stepped up following the discovery of a second Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) on the North Shore.

The single, male fly was collected from a routine surveillance trap and is the second QFF found in the past week – the first was detected in a trap in Devonport. A male Facialis fruit fly has also been detected in Otara, Auckland. As was the case in the QFF detections, the Facialis fruit fly was found in a routine surveillance trap on a residential property.

No other flies have been found and at this stage there is no indication there is an outbreak of fruit fly. The flies have been found some distance apart and there’s currently no evidence of a breeding population.

In each detection, a Biosecurity New Zealand response has been immediately set up, in partnership with KVH and other horticultural industry groups through the Government Industry Agreement (GIA). We will keep you updated of any major developments as these responses progress.

One of the most important things the responses will determine is if the flies in each case are a lone specimen or if there’s a population of these flies in the area.

More traps have been set around the finds and the movement of fruit and vegetables has been restricted as a precaution to stop the spread of any other fruit flies that may be in the area. Information is being distributed to the public via mailbox leaflet drops and door-to-door visits. KVH staff are in Auckland assisting with this work, as are members of our industry-wide KiwiNet group who have considerable skills and experience that they can add to response activities.

The restrictions in place in Otara, Devonport and Northcote are the same – whole fresh fruit and vegetables (except for leafy vegetables and root vegetables) cannot be moved outside of the A Zone of the Controlled Area. This is the area that extends 200m out from where the fly was found. Home-grown vegetables cannot be moved out of a wider B Zone. Detailed maps are available online here.

If there are no further detections, the operations in each area are expected to last two to three weeks.

We are concerned about these fruit fly detections and are taking them seriously, as are our partner horticultural organisations, and Biosecurity New Zealand. In all cases the fruit flies were found in traps, which shows that we have a good routine surveillance system that is working well and aligning with our border controls. However, we are pleased to note that Biosecurity New Zealand has said there will be an independent assessment of the air passenger and cruise pathways (a cargo pathway review is already underway) to make sure our biosecurity system is robust and that any learnings from these  detections are taken into account. KVH will closely follow the review and outcome.

The kiwifruit industry is contributing to every aspect of these responses and taking a prominent role at a Governance level, which will continue.

Please visit the KVH website for more information, or feel free to contact the team at the office on 0800 665 825 or info@kvh.org.nz if you have any questions.

A reminder that every month, latest border interception information on fruit flies is published in the KVH risk update. The updates also include details about the national fruit fly surveillance programme and news/detections around the world.

Be vigilant and keep watch. While it may be possible to find fruit flies on fruit trees, a better option is to look out for any larvae in fruit, including tree fallen fruit. Report any possible finds to Biosecurity New Zealand on 0800 80 99 66.

Biosecurity News
21 February 2019
Testing a new biosecurity reporting app
21 February 2019
A new app is being trialed to test a different way of reporting suspected biosecurity pests in New Zealand.  The Find-A-Pest app allows users to report potential biosecurity threats quickly...
Testing a new biosecurity reporting app
21 February 2019

A new app is being trialed to test a different way of reporting suspected biosecurity pests in New Zealand. 

The Find-A-Pest app allows users to report potential biosecurity threats quickly with their smart phone by sending a photo and GPS location. The reports are sent to a community of knowledgeable people from primary industries, iNaturalist NZ (a web-based citizen science platform) and science organisations for identification. The trial will evaluate the effectiveness of the app as a biosecurity reporting tool in different contexts.

App testing will be carried out by selected case study groups in Northland, Auckland, and Southland with a focus on weeds, and nationally via kiwifruit industry and planted forestry bodies (KVH and the Forest Owners Association) for a broader range of pests. Testing will take place until April 2019.

App spokesperson Dr Stephen Pawson of Scion said case studies have been selected that will put the app in the hands of the people walking New Zealand’s orchards, forests and fields.

“We’ve also included urban organisations, as research shows most pests arrive via transport hubs such as ports, which are located close to urban centres.”

“The app uses a simple, online reporting process. Users can easily submit photos, GPS location and any additional commentary from their phone.”

Functionality includes offline use for uploading when back in range of wifi or mobile reception, factsheets to help users learn what pests to look out for and Te Reo Maori translations of key information.

Reported data will add to a database of information about existing and new pests in New Zealand. Unless the suspected pest is considered new to New Zealand, app users should not expect biosecurity officers to contact them about the reported pest.

The app does not replace Biosecurity New Zealand’s exotic pests and diseases hotline (0800 80 99 66), which should be used as normal to report any suspected exotic pests.

The ‘Find-A-Pest’ smartphone app trial is a Biological Heritage National Science Challenge research project led by Scion and Lincoln University with support from Biosecurity New Zealand (part of Ministry for Primary Industries), KVH, Zespri, the Forest Owners Association, Envirolink, Te Tira Whakamataki, and iNaturalist NZ.

The future of the app will be determined by the results from across the testing groups. While success of the trial will be measured through the group testing, anyone can download the app for free from the App store or Google Play store and start reporting any suspicious insects, plants or plant diseases they see.

Biosecurity News
21 February 2019
Biosecurity risk at a glance
21 February 2019
The latest KVH Dashboard is now available, providing a quick overview of biosecurity risk and the work KVH is doing to manage risk for the kiwifruit industry. The Dashboard is produced to give...
Biosecurity risk at a glance
21 February 2019

The latest KVH Dashboard is now available, providing a quick overview of biosecurity risk and the work KVH is doing to manage risk for the kiwifruit industry.

The Dashboard is produced to give growers and the industry a one-page view of current biosecurity threat levels and our ability to manage these threats should they arrive here.

Biosecurity News
21 February 2019
Are you a biosecurity quizmaster?
21 February 2019
KVH was a proud supporter of the 2019 Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition which was held in conjunction with the Te Puke A&P show on Saturday 9 February. KVH provided a biosecurity quiz...
Are you a biosecurity quizmaster?
21 February 2019

KVH was a proud supporter of the 2019 Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition which was held in conjunction with the Te Puke A&P show on Saturday 9 February.

KVH provided a biosecurity quiz to the eight competitors – congratulations to Georgia Guy-Williams from Apata for winning the quiz and to Alex Ashe from Farmlands Te Puna for achieving overall winner for Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower of the Year.

Below is the quiz put to the competitors, who delighted us with their biosecurity knowledge by scoring an average of 80%. How does your biosecurity knowledge compare? Test yourself before checking the answers at the end of this page. Good luck!

1.      Why is biosecurity important to New Zealand and our primary industries?

2.      Who is the current Minister for Biosecurity?

3.      Psa is still an important biosecurity issue for our industry. Name two controls under the National Psa Pest Management Plan designed to prevent further spread of Psa.

4.     Biosecurity is everyone’s responsibility. What are three important actions that you can do in your role to improve our biosecurity?

5.     Movement of plant material can spread unwanted pests or diseases. Name two biosecurity related actions or considerations when sourcing new rootstock for an orchard.

6.     Travelling overseas is exciting but can lead to the introduction of pests and diseases to New Zealand. To reduce risk, what should you do if visiting a kiwifruit orchard (or other rural areas) overseas before returning home?

7.      Imagine you have just imported a tractor from Italy. Name a potential biosecurity risk that could be associated with this import and what can you do to reduce this risk.

8.     Why is traceability important for biosecurity?

9.     One of the shield bugs below is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). The other is a species commonly found in New Zealand. Choose the BMSB and give two reasons for your choice.

10.   What is this?

11.   This pest is a biosecurity threat to kiwifruit, what is it?

12.   Not all pathogens can be spread in the wind like Psa, what is another way that pathogens can spread between orchards?

13.   Name two pathogens not present in New Zealand that are biosecurity threats to our industry.

Find the answers here 

Biosecurity News
21 February 2019
Summer stats from the border
21 February 2019
Biosecurity New Zealand reports a busy summer so far for quarantine officers at Auckland International Airport, with a record number of international arrivals in December – up 3.4% to 529,443...
Summer stats from the border
21 February 2019

Biosecurity New Zealand reports a busy summer so far for quarantine officers at Auckland International Airport, with a record number of international arrivals in December – up 3.4% to 529,443 passengers. Here are some interesting numbers:

·         On average, 17,079 people went through biosecurity processes each day (up from 16,520 the year before).

·         The busiest day was 23 December, with 19,500 arrivals.

·         Even though arrival numbers have increased, clearance times have decreased. The average processing time for low-risk passengers was six minutes and 51 seconds (down from seven minutes and 26 seconds the year before).

·         Compliance for passengers coming through the Green Lane system with nothing to declare is at 99.4%.

·         So far this high-risk season, biosecurity staff at the airport have intercepted 13 stink bugs (compared to four the year before).

·         There were 1,040 infringement notices issued by biosecurity staff in December.

In other news from the frontline:

·         New x-ray screening technology is being trialled in Auckland. Called Real Time Tomography (RTT), the machine technology provides clear three-dimensional images that can easily be zoomed in on. Eventually, individual bags will be screened before passengers pick them up at baggage carousels, resulting in faster and more accurate processing of passengers.

·         A recent front-page story in the NZ Herald highlighted the level of public support for taking a hard line on travellers who don’t follow biosecurity rules. The story was about an elderly woman failing to declare some nectarines at Wellington airport, on her way from Australia to the Hawke’s Bay for her annual holiday. The nectarines could have contained fruit fly and the woman was a regular traveller to a major growing area - at last count, there were nearly 900 favourable comments about the strong action taken by Biosecurity New Zealand on the NZ Herald Facebook page.

Biosecurity News
21 February 2019
In the news
21 February 2019
Watching out for stink bugs: Agriculture Victoria biosecurity officers are on the lookout for any sign of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) after a detection in the south east of Melbourne...
In the news
21 February 2019

Watching out for stink bugs: Agriculture Victoria biosecurity officers are on the lookout for any sign of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) after a detection in the south east of Melbourne recently and have made an interesting video about their trapping and surveillance activities, featuring some footage borrowed from NZ officials.

Watch the video on YouTube but please ignore the contact phone numbers for reporting as they for an Australian audience – remember to call Biosecurity New Zealand on 0800 80 99 66 to report anything unusual.

Keep your enemies close: When it comes to bioprotection, knowing your enemy is half the battle. In a pioneer project supported by Zespri and KVH, Plant & Food Research scientists went to China to study BMSB and its natural enemy, the Samurai Wasp, at their natural habitat. Watch the video on Facebook. 

King talks mental health to kiwifruit industry: Two-hundred people from the Bay of Plenty’s kiwifruit industry heard Mike King share his mental health challenges as well as ways to deal with improving their own wellbeing and that of their friends and colleagues. The talk – ahead of the kiwifruit industry’s high-workload harvest and packing of fruit – was organised by the Future Leaders group as a timely reminder that high priority must be placed on people’s wellbeing.

Biosecurity News
21 February 2019
Quiz answers
21 February 2019
Biosecurity quiz answers: 1.    Why is biosecurity important to New Zealand and our primary industries? Biosecurity is fundamental in protecting New Zealand’s economy,...
Quiz answers
21 February 2019

Biosecurity quiz answers:

1.    Why is biosecurity important to New Zealand and our primary industries?
Biosecurity is fundamental in protecting New Zealand’s economy, environment and a range of our social and cultural values. It ensures that our unique environment and value of our primary industries are maintained by preventing any unwanted and harmful organisms from entering New Zealand and managing their impacts if they do get here.
 
2.    Who is the current Minister for Biosecurity?
The Honourable Damien O’Connor

3.    Psa is still an important biosecurity issue for our industry. Name two controls under the National Psa Pest Management Plan designed to prevent further spread of Psa.
-    Reporting any suspicious symptoms to KVH within 48 hours.
-    Having an effective crop protection programme in place.
-    Winter pruning and tying to occur before 1 October each year.
-    Commercially viable kiwifruit is harvested by 1 July each year.
-    Psa positive orchards ensure their orchards are not a significant infection risk to nearby orchards.
-    Controls associated with the movement of risk goods that could transport Psa (e.g. rootstock, budwood, pollen, machinery, bins, beehives etc).

4.    Biosecurity is everyone’s responsibility. What are three important actions that you can do in your role to improve our biosecurity?
-    Promote the importance of biosecurity in your every day practices.
-    Build biosecurity requirements into contracts that you create with staff and service providers.
-    Establish a pest of the month campaign in your workplace to educate staff about potential risks and what to do if anything of concern is found.
-    Ensure that your systems are biosecurity robust.
-    Follow the pathway management plan for Psa.
-    Include biosecurity as a standard item on meeting agendas.
-    Get staff training to manage biosecurity risks on the job.
-    Report the unusual.

5.    Movement of plant material can spread unwanted pests or diseases. Name two biosecurity related actions or considerations when sourcing new rootstock for an orchard.
-    Ensure the nursery is meeting KVH requirements and has Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) certification.
-    Consider KPCS certification: “full” vs “restricted”.
-    Consider the areas in which rootstock is moving- i.e. Recovery region to Containment region and whether KVH approval is required.
-    Inspect plants upon arrival before introducing into the orchard.

6.    Travelling overseas is exciting but can lead to the introduction of pests and diseases to New Zealand. To reduce risk, what should you do if visiting a kiwifruit orchard (or other rural areas) overseas before returning home?
-    Declare risk goods on arrival in New Zealand.
-    Clean all clothing and footwear that has been used overseas, paying special attention to plant material, seeds and soil.
-    Where possible, do not bring equipment used on orchards overseas back into New Zealand. If you need too then clean and disinfect/sanitise all equipment.
-    Inform border staff if you have been in rural areas, particularly on orchards.

7.    Imagine you have just imported a tractor from Italy. Name a potential biosecurity risk that could be associated with this import and what can you do to reduce this risk?
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) could be a potential risk from Italy. Ensure import guidelines for these goods are followed according to MPI standards. Check goods on arrival to ensure that nothing has remained on the tractor before allowing it into the orchard. Also accept any other biosecurity risks that could be present either as hitchhikers or on plant material or soil contaminants.

8.    Why is traceability important for biosecurity?
Traceability is an essential component for biosecurity surveillance, response and management.

Tracing where goods have come from and are going to, allows for a rapid understanding of movements when biosecurity threats occur. It assists in understanding and delimiting the spread and helps to determine the best management approach when responding to a threat.  It also provides our trading partners with assurances that the goods they are receiving are safe, and free of pests and diseases.

9.    One of the shield bugs below is a BMSB. The other is a species commonly found in New Zealand. Choose the BMSB and give two reasons for your choice.
The BMSB is on the left. Reasons: larger size (about the size of a 10-cent coin), white banding on the antennae, and alternate markings on the abdomen.



10.    What is this?
It is a BMSB nymph.



11.    This pest is a biosecurity threat to kiwifruit, what is it?
Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)



12.    Not all pathogens can be spread in the wind like Psa, what is another way that pathogens can spread between orchards?
-    On tools/machinery used between orchards
-    With people movements/footwear
-    Animals
-    Grafting of infected material
-    Insect Vectors
-    Rain
-    Through the soil


13.    Name two pathogens not present in New Zealand that are biosecurity threats to our industry?
-    Accept any pathogens that feature on our priority pest list however common examples include:
-    Brazilian Wilt (Ceratocystis fimbriata)
-    Phytophthoras
-    Verticillium Wilt
-    Non-New Zealand Psa strains

Company Notices
21 February 2019
New look for the KVH website
21 February 2019
We’ve refreshed the homepage of our website to make it easier to use and so that you can quickly access the most used resources we offer. The homepage now contains the red KVH logo front and...
New look for the KVH website
21 February 2019

We’ve refreshed the homepage of our website to make it easier to use and so that you can quickly access the most used resources we offer.

The homepage now contains the red KVH logo front and centre; sections for growers and nurseries to click on and get all the information they need; and new buttons to access to the most used pages with one click – namely the Psa risk model, the list of kiwifruit’s most unwanted threats, and the current list of protective spray products. 

Biosecurity News
21 February 2019
Biosecurity micro-credential programme
21 February 2019
The Primary Industry Training Organisation (ITO), together with the horticulture industry and KVH has developed a biosecurity micro-credential (a short, focused piece of learning) to enhance industry...
Biosecurity micro-credential programme
21 February 2019

The Primary Industry Training Organisation (ITO), together with the horticulture industry and KVH has developed a biosecurity micro-credential (a short, focused piece of learning) to enhance industry biosecurity capability. This micro-credential has been developed under the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) framework, targeting grower owner-operators and supervisors/managers (NZQA Level 5).

The micro-credential content includes biosecurity principles, on-farm practices and an assessment component. It is designed to give an individual an understanding of biosecurity; what risks are present on their orchard/farm; how to prioritise and manage them; and then asks how practices can be put in place or improved.

To ensure the micro-credential is relevant and will provide learning outcomes of value to growers and other industry participants it has been developed with biosecurity managers from KVH as well as New Zealand Winegrowers, Summerfruit New Zealand, New Zealand Apples and Pears, Horticulture New Zealand, TomatoesNZ and Vegetables New Zealand.

The micro-credential programme is now being rolled out and we are seeking individuals who are either grower owner-operators or in managerial/supervisor positions to participate in the programme. Individuals will be required to actively participate in the pilot course, and then undertake an assessment component on biosecurity practices on their orchards to be awarded the micro-credential.

As the programme is still being tested with industry groups there is no cost for participating and all materials and catering will be provided. By agreeing to take part in the pilot, participants agree to completing the assessment and providing feedback to course organisers after completion.

If you are interested in participating in this programme, please email info@kvh.org.nz by Friday 8 March 2019. There are limited places available so please get in touch to be sure you can secure a spot.

What: Biosecurity Micro-credential programme workshop for the kiwifruit industry

When: 10am – 3pm, Tuesday 12 March 2019 (morning tea and lunch provided)


Where: Armoury Room, Classic Flyers, Jean Batten Drive, Mount Maunganui

Biosecurity News
21 February 2019
Returning from overseas or know someone visiting New Zealand?
21 February 2019
Whether returning home from a holiday or visiting New Zealand for seasonal work, everyone has a role to play in protecting kiwifruit orchards from unwanted pests and diseases that could affect jobs,...
Returning from overseas or know someone visiting New Zealand?
21 February 2019

Whether returning home from a holiday or visiting New Zealand for seasonal work, everyone has a role to play in protecting kiwifruit orchards from unwanted pests and diseases that could affect jobs, income, and the community.

Any person in the kiwifruit industry or coming to New Zealand to work on an orchard has a responsibility to manage biosecurity risks when travelling. To assist with this, KVH has developed a best practice poster to help reduce biosecurity risk after visiting or working on an offshore orchard or farm; showing what items need to be cleaned before packing luggage and why; and to explain what people can expect at border control when arriving in New Zealand. You can download and print the poster, or contact KVH if you’d like us to print a larger size for you, your orchard, workplace or staffroom.

Everyone in the kiwifruit industry or coming to New Zealand to work on an orchard, has a responsibility to manage biosecurity risks when travelling. 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz