Search Site

Newsroom

Print these articles
Biosecurity News
14 November 2019
Better plan for managing kiwifruit industry risk
14 November 2019
KVH is looking at a new regulation framework to better manage biosecurity risk to the New Zealand kiwifruit industry. Growers views are being sought on a proposed new Pathway Management Plan, which...
Better plan for managing kiwifruit industry risk
14 November 2019

KVH is looking at a new regulation framework to better manage biosecurity risk to the New Zealand kiwifruit industry.

Growers views are being sought on a proposed new Pathway Management Plan, which would offer better protection, more value for money, and increased simplicity around rules and regulations.

Instead of focusing on a single pest, like Psa, the proposed Plan focuses on management of risk associated with the pathways by which diseases or pests are transmitted.  This covers the full range of biosecurity threats to our industry and provides for a consistent and pragmatic approach to managing pathway risks such as movement of all plant material, international visitors, and high-risk second hand or imported equipment coming onto our orchards.

The proposed Plan is equivalent to the current Psa-V National Pest Management Plan (NPMP) but is more fit-for-purpose and makes sure all the right settings are in place so that we can detect anything new quickly enough to stop its spread, limit impacts, and aim for eradication.

KVH proposes that the Plan will replace the current Psa-V NPMP as it will retain the important elements needed for Psa protection (e.g. controlling movements of high-risk pathways to the South Island) but also provide much wider benefits: 

·         better protection

·         more value for money

·         increased simplicity around rules and regulations

·         right settings for early detection of new threats

·         consistent and pragmatic. 

Pathway plans enable an organisation like KVH to do things like setting clear objectives and rules for the industry and accessing powers needed to effectively manage risks on a wider scale than for just Psa. They designate a management agency responsible for the Plan, which in this case would be KVH. They also enable the agency to raise funding through a levy if needed, although KVH is hoping to manage this all under one existing levy, without any net increase to growers. 

The proposed Plan is summarised in the one-page fact sheet available here and detailed in the consultation paper available here. Both documents are available on our website, alongside a submission form. You can also email us at info@kvh.org.nz or phone 0800 665 825 to provide comments.  

Based on feedback received, a full plan and implementation schedule will be developed and shared in early 2020 for your input before it is finalised.  

We encourage you to have a say and let us know your thoughts on the proposed new Plan.

Protocols & Movement Controls
14 November 2019
Whangarei new positives
14 November 2019
Last week KVH completed a monitoring round in the Whangarei region of 14 orchards around the current positive orchards. A further three orchards were confirmed Psa positive through Hill Laboratories...
Whangarei new positives
14 November 2019

Last week KVH completed a monitoring round in the Whangarei region of 14 orchards around the current positive orchards.

A further three orchards were confirmed Psa positive through Hill Laboratories testing, bringing the total of positive orchards in the region to nine.

The region remains a Containment region – currently only 23.4% of the region’s hectares are on an orchard with Psa.

Growers are urged to remain vigilant, monitor their orchards regularly and maintain a regular protectant programme.

More information about growing regions and regional classifications is available on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
14 November 2019
BMSB hitches a ride in online shopping
14 November 2019
Reminding us all how close-to-home the stink bug risk is, a local post-harvest staff member recently had a mail package arrive from Virginia in the USA, complete with what looked like a Brown...
BMSB hitches a ride in online shopping
14 November 2019

Reminding us all how close-to-home the stink bug risk is, a local post-harvest staff member recently had a mail package arrive from Virginia in the USA, complete with what looked like a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

Knowing exactly what to do, they caught the bug in a plastic container and reported it to Biosecurity New Zealand who confirmed it was a BMSB. A great catch!

If you, your family, co-workers or friends receive mail from overseas (especially from the USA) remember to check parcels for any pests such as BMSB that may have snuck a ride to New Zealand. We have a short video about being careful when opening parcels on our YouTube channel here.

Biosecurity News
14 November 2019
Hail damage adds to Psa risk
14 November 2019
Wild spring weather, including hail storms in the western Bay of Plenty, continues to add Psa risk for many sites across growing regions. Damaged leaves and canes should be protected with copper to...
Hail damage adds to Psa risk
14 November 2019

Wild spring weather, including hail storms in the western Bay of Plenty, continues to add Psa risk for many sites across growing regions.

Damaged leaves and canes should be protected with copper to minimise infection risk, especially if there is already a high inoculum source due to heavy leaf spotting across blocks. Psa control options reduce as blocks move through to flowering but late flowering sites may still have a window to apply Actigard. This is highly recommended, particularly for wind prone sites. Ensure young plants or grafts are also protected.

When applying coppers, maintain a five to seven-day gap between applications of foliars and copper to minimise risk of phytotoxicity to leaves and fruit. Do not apply sprays in poor drying conditions, or high humidity, as risk of fruit staining increases.

Gold skin sensitivity commences around 21 days after fruit set with risk increasing between 28 and 42 days and reducing again between 42 and 80 days. For Hayward, 14 to 35 days after fruit set is considered a high-risk period. Copper may be applied during these periods but take care to ensure drying conditions are optimal.

The Psa Risk Model indicates ongoing moderate risk from most stations over the next week so take every opportunity to prune male vines and complete girdling in the dry. Follow up with copper spray. Apply wound protectants to all large cuts.

Refer to the KVH recommended product list for more information about summer rates.

Biosecurity News
14 November 2019
No new flies found in Auckland response
14 November 2019
Auckland fruit fly response efforts are continuing – a 12-week long spring baiting programme in the Northcote controlled area has been ongoing since 19 August and was completed last Friday 8...
No new flies found in Auckland response
14 November 2019

Auckland fruit fly response efforts are continuing – a 12-week long spring baiting programme in the Northcote controlled area has been ongoing since 19 August and was completed last Friday 8 November, in an effort to kill any fruit flies that may have overwintered.

All properties in the controlled area were baited every week according to their proximity to fruit fly finds. Although baiting has now finished, the Controlled Area Notice in the Northcote area remains in place, which restricts the movement of certain fruit and vegetables.

The focus of the response’s operational activities now remains on intensive trapping and movement controls. As we progress into the warmer months, the response will also be preparing for a range of scenarios.

Trap inspections will continue to be carried out weekly. The last Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF), a single male, was detected 15 July. This find took the total number of QFF found in the Northcote area to 10, and there has still been no evidence of larvae, pupae, eggs or female flies found. 

Company Notices
14 November 2019
Zespri representation on KVH Board
14 November 2019
From December 2019 Craig Thompson will replace Nathan Flowerday as the Zespri representative on the KVH Board. The KVH Board welcomes Craig as the Zespri representative.  KVH is not entirely...
Zespri representation on KVH Board
14 November 2019

From December 2019 Craig Thompson will replace Nathan Flowerday as the Zespri representative on the KVH Board.

The KVH Board welcomes Craig as the Zespri representative. 

KVH is not entirely new to Craig, as he has previously held the supplier representative position on the Board.

KVH would like to thank Nathan for his service to the organisation. Nathan has held the Zespri position since 2013 and his grower, financial and Zespri experience has contributed significantly to the development of KVH over the years.

Grower News
14 November 2019
Take our quick survey on biosecurity practice
14 November 2019
We’re running a quick and short survey on biosecurity and hygiene practices among those who spend the most time working on and managing kiwifruit orchards. KVH is focused on raising awareness...
Take our quick survey on biosecurity practice
14 November 2019

We’re running a quick and short survey on biosecurity and hygiene practices among those who spend the most time working on and managing kiwifruit orchards.

KVH is focused on raising awareness of good biosecurity practices on-orchard and the benefits these can bring.  In doing this, we need help to learn more about the level of understanding of biosecurity amongst growers, what biosecurity practices are currently used on orchards and whether there are any common limitations to putting practices in place.

This survey will give us a clearer picture of where we can focus our efforts so that we’re better serving growers by providing the information and resources needed. The same survey is being undertaken by the avocado, passionfruit and forestry sectors so we can compare biosecurity perceptions across industries.

Your views are important – please complete the survey online. The questions are all optional to answer and you will not be identified in any of the results.

Biosecurity News
14 November 2019
Building bug awareness with local schools
14 November 2019
KVH partnered with others from the Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) initiative last week to join students from Te Puna School at their camp, which included sessions on learning more about...
Building bug awareness with local schools
14 November 2019

KVH partnered with others from the Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) initiative last week to join students from Te Puna School at their camp, which included sessions on learning more about the importance of biosecurity and protecting native bush and rivers.

Hosted at Waitawheta Camp and local sites, John Mather from KVH shared his knowledge of kiwifruit biosecurity, including the importance of reporting and dealing to invasive weeds and pests such as the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). Local students taking part in biosecurity activities and being on the lookout can provide early warning of unwanted threats that could affect kiwifruit orchards so are an important part of the biosecurity team.

Alongside KVH, the Department of Conservation shared knowledge of native plants and their traditional uses, and TMBC guided students through kauri dieback cleaning stations - the Bay of Plenty is still the only region free of the disease.

Biosecurity News
14 November 2019
New fruit fly grower guide
14 November 2019
KVH has developed a helpful new guide for growers, detailing the likely sequence of events if a fruit fly response was to occur in a kiwifruit growing region, to allow for business continuity...
New fruit fly grower guide
14 November 2019

KVH has developed a helpful new guide for growers, detailing the likely sequence of events if a fruit fly response was to occur in a kiwifruit growing region, to allow for business continuity planning at orchard level.

The guide is split into several different sections and covers:

·         fruit fly distribution across the world and why they are a threat to New Zealand

·         what to look out for on orchards

·         controls to keep fruit flies from getting here

·         detection methods in case they do get here

·         controls in the event of a detection and different levels of response

·         how to maintain business continuity and what activities can take place on the orchard in responses

·         how growers and orchards are affected by export restrictions. 

The information in the guide is based on Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) and should be treated as guidance as every response is different and things like controlled area zones and market access restrictions can change from one response to the next.

The guide has been added to the fruit fly section of the KVH website and can be downloaded here. Please contact KVH is you would like a copy printed and sent to you. 

Biosecurity News
14 November 2019
Industry practices prepping for fruit fly
14 November 2019
New Zealand is one of the only countries in the world that has a major horticultural industry and is free of economically important fruit fly, such as Queensland Fruit Fly. This freedom provides...
Industry practices prepping for fruit fly
14 November 2019

New Zealand is one of the only countries in the world that has a major horticultural industry and is free of economically important fruit fly, such as Queensland Fruit Fly. This freedom provides significant advantages to our growers and is something that New Zealand works hard to maintain.

To help inform the kiwifruit industry on the likely sequence of events should a fruit fly be found in a production region, and thus to allow for better business continuity and contingency planning, KVH and Zespri have been visiting post-harvest companies running a fruit fly simulation.

To date, all fruit fly incursions in New Zealand have occurred in urban areas, making it tricky for us as an industry to plan for a potential response in a production region, such as in the Bay of Plenty.

The purpose of the simulations is to stimulate conversation to help identify knowledge gaps for the overall response to a fruit fly find to better inform business continuity and contingency planning. The exercises also ensure that going forward, post-harvest companies have procedures in place and capability for managing possible restrictions on fruit movements associated with a response.

We have run these simulations with EastPack, Apata, OPAC, MPAC, Trevelyan’s, Humes, Birchwood and DMS, with Punchbowl remaining. They have been a great opportunity to carry out simulated scenarios involving a range of people and have allowed for connections both within and between organisations that will mean better fruit fly preparedness across the kiwifruit industry.

KVH has also developed a helpful new guide for growers, detailing the likely sequence of events if a fruit fly response was to occur in a kiwifruit growing region. Read more about the guide here.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz