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Biosecurity News
13 May 2021
Autumn vine health review
13 May 2021
It’s a great time to monitor for disease issues within a block, on a vine-by-vine basis. Check vines that have moved into autumn colours early, as these may also be showing other signs of...
Autumn vine health review
13 May 2021

It’s a great time to monitor for disease issues within a block, on a vine-by-vine basis.

Check vines that have moved into autumn colours early, as these may also be showing other signs of disease. Look for evidence of infection in trunk bases, girdles and roots as fungal organisms may have gone unnoticed.

A stocktake of vines with poorer health may flag the need to begin a replant strategy or to further investigate the cause of the problems. If symptoms seem unusual contact the KVH team at info@kvh.org.nz.

Good practice orchard hygiene includes removal of any vines that have died this season, as well as old stumps that have not previously been removed.

If poorer production has been attributed to Psa, identify the areas most affected, and consider how to reduce ongoing risk before next season. Improved shelter, better drainage to reduce vine stress and focused removal of cankers and infected tissue (both of which are ongoing inoculum sources) will all reduce future risk.

Less Psa tolerant older variety males can be targeted for regraft to more tolerant varieties this winter and trimming high, late-grown male canes, will reduce risk of Psa entry through frosted tissue. Tagging of vines with unhealed girdles is good practice as these may become Psa hot-spots next spring.

A spray programme including copper and Actigard throughout the post-harvest and leaf-fall period is needed to counter risk created by wetter autumn periods. Copper and Actigard may be tank mixed, however do not tank mix either copper or Actigard with post-harvest Movento. A seven-day period between applications of Actigard and Movento is recommended and where copper has been applied, allow a seven-day window before applying Movento.

Biosecurity News
13 May 2021
Fruit fly season update
13 May 2021
There was one border detection of fruit fly in April, and it was of our most unwanted Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF). The interception of QFF larvae was in a feijoa seized from a passenger travelling...
Fruit fly season update
13 May 2021

There was one border detection of fruit fly in April, and it was of our most unwanted Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF).

The interception of QFF larvae was in a feijoa seized from a passenger travelling from Australia.

You can read more in the latest monthly KVH fruit fly risk update (April), which includes data reported by Biosecurity New Zealand.

This latest find is a remember that although we are nearing the end of the high-risk period for fruit flies and visitor numbers to New Zealand are much lower as a result of COVID-19, it is important to remain vigilant, keep watch, and if you hear of travellers who have accidently bought fruit or vegetables into New Zealand make sure it is reported and then appropriately destroyed (bagged and put in the rubbish is the best way, not composted).

Protocols & Movement Controls
13 May 2021
Movement of mature plants
13 May 2021
Growers may wish to move mature kiwifruit plants from areas where they have double planted to another orchard. The movement of plant material is considered a high-risk biosecurity pathway for the...
Movement of mature plants
13 May 2021

Growers may wish to move mature kiwifruit plants from areas where they have double planted to another orchard.

The movement of plant material is considered a high-risk biosecurity pathway for the transmission of unwanted organisms and therefore it is important that any such movements are given careful consideration and that appropriate measures are implemented to mitigate risk. For more information please refer to the KVH Protocol: Mature Plant Movements.

Please contact KVH (0800 665 825 or info@kvh.org.nz) well in advance if you wish to move any mature kiwifruit vines between properties.

Biosecurity News
13 May 2021
BMSB awareness campaign proves its worth
13 May 2021
Every New Zealander has a role to play in managing the risk of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). During the most recent high-risk season (September 2020 through to April 2021) KVH co-funded the...
BMSB awareness campaign proves its worth
13 May 2021

Every New Zealander has a role to play in managing the risk of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

During the most recent high-risk season (September 2020 through to April 2021) KVH co-funded the annual nationwide BMSB education campaign with Biosecurity New Zealand and other horticultural sectors to lift public awareness around the damaging impacts of the pest and increase the likelihood of early detection through surveillance.

The results of the summer campaign are in:

  • BMSB ads were shown on screens more than eight million times, via banner ads, social media, and YouTube ads.
  • There were 45,800 visits to the BMSB pages on the Biosecurity New Zealand website – over half came directly from people watching the online ads.
  • Sponsored nights on Choice TV and HGTV reached over 738,000 people.
  • Full page ads in NZ Gardener and Kiwi Gardener December 2020 magazines had a readership of almost 400,000 people.
  • There were only 311 calls to the Biosecurity New Zealand pest and disease hotline through the campaign period which is well down from the record of 1,415 the previous season. This is reflective of lower calls to the hotline overall this year, as well as a slower BMSB season.

Partnerships were also a big focus of the campaign. KVH worked across the kiwifruit industry and kiwifruit growing community groups to talk about BMSB and distribute information. Some initiatives were:

  • Posters, fliers, stickers, and videos shared with growers, pack-houses, transitional facilities, schools, and community groups.
  • Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) ran a BMSB awareness campaign that included a large banner on the Grain Corp tanks on Hewletts Road near the Port of Tauranga and an interactive online BMSB quiz that ran throughout September 2020.
  • During the regional Biosecurity Week, the Port of Tauranga Biosecurity Excellence partnership discussed BMSB with staff who work on and around the port. Calendars, playing cards, key rings and pest alerts were distributed.

Next season’s campaign will likely continue to target the wider public because that is what keeps resulting in engagement or ‘click throughs’ to more detailed information online. Digital/online advertising will continue to be used because we know that people are watching our ads/videos through until the end and are then ringing the pest hotline or visiting official BMSB web pages. It’s also a far-reaching medium that is very cost effective.

Partnerships with the kiwifruit industry through KVH, TMBC and the Port of Tauranga Excellence programme will continue as they are all working well and generate interest, as well as keeping BMSB top of mind for key audiences.

Biosecurity News
13 May 2021
Biosecurity response skills put to the test
13 May 2021
KVH took part in a regional exercise yesterday to practice and improve biosecurity response skills across Tauranga. The simulation, organised by the Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC)...
Biosecurity response skills put to the test
13 May 2021

KVH took part in a regional exercise yesterday to practice and improve biosecurity response skills across Tauranga.

The simulation, organised by the Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) initiative and run by specialists from Biosecurity New Zealand, ran the whole day and provided practical experience based on a real-life response. In this case, the example for the simulation was a marine response to a detection of the unwanted Northern Pacific Seastar, which hasn’t established anywhere in New Zealand and is a voracious predator that displaces native and fisheries species.

KVH staff are well trained and experienced in biosecurity responses, and the exercise gave us a practical reminder of what it’s really like to participate in a fast-moving event involving many different groups of people who all need to be kept informed and updated.

Importantly, the exercise was focused on building TMBC capability as a network and being prepared to help stop the spread of any nasty invasions in the region, of huge benefit to the kiwifruit industry in the event of a response affecting us as it would mean an additional trained community network to help support KVH and KiwiNet – our dedicated group of people selected from across the kiwifruit industry who champion biosecurity readiness and coordinate the deployment of industry resources into responses.

Biosecurity News
13 May 2021
Fun Fact
13 May 2021
$1.78 trillion. That’s the staggering figure of how much invasive species have cost the world, at the absolute minimum, since 1970. Experts say this cost – and the associated costs of...
Fun Fact
13 May 2021

$1.78 trillion. That’s the staggering figure of how much invasive species have cost the world, at the absolute minimum, since 1970. Experts say this cost – and the associated costs of managing and responding to such threats - are rising rapidly.

We heard the fact while listening to a biosecurity podcast on Radio New Zealand about the effects of kauri dieback disease, an invasive which is infecting and killing thousands of trees in Auckland and Northland.

The disease hasn’t been found in kauri in the Bay of Plenty and we want to keep it that way. Being a soil-borne pathogen, stopping the spread (potentially unknown) is aided by very similar best practices we ask of kiwifruit growers and visitors to orchards. If you’re out in the region’s forests, remember to 'scrub, spray, and stay' (clean off footwear, use disinfectant, stay on track). Watch the video on our YouTube channel showing you how.

Biosecurity News
13 May 2021
Improving sea cargo biosecurity
13 May 2021
A work programme is set to improve biosecurity for sea cargo – a pathway that is under increasing pressure from new biosecurity threats and rising volumes. Run by Biosecurity New Zealand, the...
Improving sea cargo biosecurity
13 May 2021

A work programme is set to improve biosecurity for sea cargo – a pathway that is under increasing pressure from new biosecurity threats and rising volumes.

Run by Biosecurity New Zealand, the programme has been in place since January 2020 and stems from an independent review commissioned to gain a better understanding of cargo clearance procedures and strains.

Work underway or completed to date includes the introduction of new technology such as a new risk and intelligence tool that uses information lodged by shippers and importers to automatically assess arriving cargo for biosecurity threats, and new liaison roles to work directly with industry.

Transitional facilities (TFs) play a crucial role in the sea cargo pathway by providing secure locations with trained staff to manage uncleared goods. The approach relies on these private facilities meeting their biosecurity responsibilities. Unfortunately, Biosecurity New Zealand auditing doesn’t present a rosy picture of voluntary compliance among TFs – many offenders are small operators that deal with only 60 to 100 containers a year and haven’t invested enough in biosecurity.

To lift compliance there are several changes coming up for TFs under the improvement programme, including individual ranking of each site by biosecurity risk (those that pose the greatest risk will face greater scrutiny); more accountability (requiring documented assurance of obligations being met); and greater enforcement tools (introducing the ability to impose an immediate suspension if there is a failure that results in clear biosecurity risk).

KVH works closely with Biosecurity New Zealand border clearance services across New Zealand, including the Mount Maunganui team, and will be closely following this work programme, and it’s outcomes, through the Port of Tauranga Biosecurity Excellence programme which works with frontline staff and TFs with the goal of preventing biosecurity risk in the region.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz