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Company Notices
10 December 2020
Merry Christmas from KVH
10 December 2020
The KVH team wish you a safe and joyous festive season and a pest-free new year! Although this is the last Bulletin for the year, the team are in the office and available until we close from 5.00pm...
Merry Christmas from KVH
10 December 2020

The KVH team wish you a safe and joyous festive season and a pest-free new year!

Although this is the last Bulletin for the year, the team are in the office and available until we close from 5.00pm on Wednesday 23 December 2020 and reopen at 8.30am on Tuesday 5 January 2021.

If any urgent issues arise - or you notice unusual symptoms that require urgent follow up during this period - please contact info@kvh.org.nz or Chief Executive Stu Hutchings on 0274 787 901.

Biosecurity News
10 December 2020
Hill Laboratories testing over the holidays
10 December 2020
With the upcoming Christmas holiday period, the last date for Psa samples arriving in the lab at Hills will be next Tuesday 15 December 2020. Psa testing will resume on Tuesday 5 January...
Hill Laboratories testing over the holidays
10 December 2020

With the upcoming Christmas holiday period, the last date for Psa samples arriving in the lab at Hills will be next Tuesday 15 December 2020. Psa testing will resume on Tuesday 5 January 2021.

Only KVH pre-arranged Psa testing will be accepted between these dates. Please contact Karyn Lowry on 027 227 1157 if urgent Psa testing is required between 16 December and 4 January. Photos of symptoms will be required. We anticipate these will only be from areas currently free of Psa (i.e. the South Island).

Growers who notice other unusual symptoms that require urgent follow up over the Christmas break can contact info@kvh.org.nz for follow up.

Biosecurity News
10 December 2020
Remember to have your say on the proposed Pathway Plan
10 December 2020
KVH consultation on the proposed Pathway Plan for the kiwifruit industry has continued over the last few weeks, with wide-ranging and constructive feedback still being received. The consultation...
Remember to have your say on the proposed Pathway Plan
10 December 2020

KVH consultation on the proposed Pathway Plan for the kiwifruit industry has continued over the last few weeks, with wide-ranging and constructive feedback still being received.

The consultation period closes tomorrow, Friday 11 December, so don’t hesitate to get your views in to us if you haven’t yet had your say. A summary of the consultation process to date; what we’ve heard; how we’ve taken support and suggested areas of improvement into account; and next steps can be found on the KVH website here.

Our intent with this summary document is to provide confidence that we have listened and taken appropriate measures to address the feedback received. 

We encourage you to contact us if you have any questions about the proposal, and if you have any comments on any aspect of the Pathway Plan – good or bad – please send them in to us by emailing info@kvh.org.nz or by filling in the submission form available online.

Biosecurity News
10 December 2020
Vine decline focus at KiwiNet meeting
10 December 2020
KVH ran its regular KiwiNet workshop last Wednesday, with around 40 people from across the kiwifruit industry coming together for the day’s presentations. This third KiwiNet workshop of 2020...
Vine decline focus at KiwiNet meeting
10 December 2020

KVH ran its regular KiwiNet workshop last Wednesday, with around 40 people from across the kiwifruit industry coming together for the day’s presentations.

This third KiwiNet workshop of 2020 included a session on what we know, what we’re learning, and how we’re building our understanding of risk from vine decline. Dr Sonia Whiteman from Zespri focused on Kiwifruit Vine Decline Syndrome (KVDS) and Erin Lane from KVH focused on Kiwifruit Trunk Disease. Both gave presentations that detailed what has been learnt so far about vine decline from ongoing research and overseas experience, and current management advice for growers. KVDS has been of particular interest to many lately, and has had a lot of media attention – read our article about how the syndrome highlights the importance of a Pathway Plan, like the one we are currently proposing, here.

The workshop also gave attendees an exclusive insight into the changes and challenges being faced head-on at our borders. Mike Inglis, Northern Regional Commissioner at the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and this teams are responsible for our passenger, mail, freight, and cruise pathways in the upper North Island and he talked about the work they are doing to ensure we have the world’s safest and smartest border – including impacts of COVID-19, evolving technology, risk profiling, and the importance of collaboration with proactive industries like kiwifruit.

You can view PowerPoint presentations from the day on the KVH website here and read more about the KiwiNet group here.

Biosecurity News
10 December 2020
Latest BMSB finds
10 December 2020
Since the start of the high-risk season in September there have been six live stink bug finds, about a third of what was found at this time last season. Over the last few weeks there were four of...
Latest BMSB finds
10 December 2020

Since the start of the high-risk season in September there have been six live stink bug finds, about a third of what was found at this time last season.

Over the last few weeks there were four of the unwanted bugs found at the border (mostly at transitional facilities, where goods await clearance for release) and two found post-border (on or near recently imported goods). All were investigated, with no further sign of any insects.

More detail can be read in the latest monthly KVH BMSB risk update, which includes data reported by Biosecurity New Zealand and information about activities involving KVH to make sure that everything possible is being done to prepare for and respond to this unwanted pest.

These detections are a stark reminder of how real the BMSB risk is to our kiwifruit industry – remember to be on the lookout and report anything unusual. Information and videos about BMSB are available on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
10 December 2020
On the lookout for fruit fly
10 December 2020
There was one case of fruit fly larvae found at the border in October. It was Pacific Fruit Fly found in watermelons from Tonga, which resulted in the temporary suspension of imports while...
On the lookout for fruit fly
10 December 2020

There was one case of fruit fly larvae found at the border in October. It was Pacific Fruit Fly found in watermelons from Tonga, which resulted in the temporary suspension of imports while Biosecurity New Zealand undertook an investigation.

There have been no detections so far this high-risk season (which started in September) of our highest-risk Queensland Fruit Fly.

You can read more in the latest monthly KVH fruit fly risk update, which includes data on detections and surveillance trap monitoring.

Remember: the high-risk period for fruit flies runs through the summer months. Be vigilant and keep watch. It is often difficult to spot adult fruit flies on fruit trees; the better option is to look out for any larvae in fruit. Report any finds or anything else unusual to either the pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66 or KVH on 0800 665 825.

Biosecurity News
10 December 2020
First detection for hand baggage scanner
10 December 2020
Biosecurity New Zealand’s new hand baggage scanner has made its first detection – two bananas in a small carry-on bag arriving with a New Zealand family from Dubai. The scanner has been...
First detection for hand baggage scanner
10 December 2020

Biosecurity New Zealand’s new hand baggage scanner has made its first detection – two bananas in a small carry-on bag arriving with a New Zealand family from Dubai.

The scanner has been in use since late October at Auckland Airport, where arriving passengers have their hand baggage scanned before they collect checked-in items from the airport carousels. Baggage that travellers carry off the plane is deliberately being targeted because that’s where food that could host fruit fly and other pests is most likely to be found.

The scanner uses technology that produces three-dimensional images of baggage contents and is at least 2.5 times better at detecting risk items than 2D x-ray imaging. 

Biosecurity News
10 December 2020
Electronic mail screening moves closer
10 December 2020
Traditionally, border biosecurity staff don’t see any information about items arriving at the International Mail Centre before they appear on the mail belt for screening by x-ray or detector...
Electronic mail screening moves closer
10 December 2020

Traditionally, border biosecurity staff don’t see any information about items arriving at the International Mail Centre before they appear on the mail belt for screening by x-ray or detector dog.

New data rules from the Universal Postal Union and World Customs Organization are a game changer. They allow information about things like contents, the name of the exporter, and the country of origin to be captured in a barcode, which can be scanned on arrival – all information useful for biosecurity, allowing items of interest to be picked up quickly and pulled aside for scrutiny.

The new data will be mandatory across the globe from January 2021, opening an enormous window of opportunity for Biosecurity New Zealand to learn more about what’s coming into New Zealand, particularly important given the burgeoning e-commerce risk as more and more people go online to order goods from overseas, especially seeds and plants.

Demand for fruit and veggie seeds have skyrocketed during COVID-19, leading to increased interest in online providers based overseas – some of whom KVH is aware have been offering varieties of kiwifruit seed for sale. Unfortunately, many seeds purchased online aren’t what they say they are and more importantly do not meet New Zealand’s strict biosecurity rules and could risk introducing a plant disease.

Growers are reminded that importing seeds is best left to reputable commercial operators who know what they are doing and are aware of what they must always do to meet the rules (including an import permit; phytosanitary certificate; and post entry quarantine for example).

Biosecurity News
10 December 2020
In the news
10 December 2020
Building biosecurity into how we move forward: The world is learning to adapt to Covid-19 and New Zealand is at a very important “survive or thrive” juncture on how it moves forward. This...
In the news
10 December 2020

Building biosecurity into how we move forward: The world is learning to adapt to Covid-19 and New Zealand is at a very important “survive or thrive” juncture on how it moves forward. This is how KPMG’s head of agri-business Ian Proudfoot described NZ’s current position to delegates at last month’s Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital’s annual symposium.

“The fact we’ve closed the border gives us a chance to take a really fresh look at how we bring high-value travellers back – to make sure they respect and enhance biosecurity but also that we create a system that enables a whole new way of integrating biosecurity into New Zealanders as well.”

Biosecurity News
10 December 2020
Biosecurity risk at a glance
10 December 2020
The latest KVH Dashboard has been published, providing a quick overview of current biosecurity threats and the work KVH is doing to manage risk for the kiwifruit industry. The Dashboard is produced...
Biosecurity risk at a glance
10 December 2020

The latest KVH Dashboard has been published, providing a quick overview of current biosecurity threats and the work KVH is doing to manage risk for the kiwifruit industry.

The Dashboard is produced to give growers and the industry a one-page view of current threat levels and our ability to manage these should they arrive here.

Biosecurity News
10 December 2020
Festive Fun Fact
10 December 2020
Did you know that one year not so long ago someone put a Christmas tree – with soil – in the post to New Zealand? Auckland biosecurity staff were gobsmacked to find the small (30cm) live...
Festive Fun Fact
10 December 2020

Did you know that one year not so long ago someone put a Christmas tree – with soil – in the post to New Zealand?

Auckland biosecurity staff were gobsmacked to find the small (30cm) live Christmas tree coming through the x-ray machine at the International Mail Centre. The packaged pine tree had arrived from the UK complete with a pot of soil and apparently left the quarantine inspector working the x-ray machine thinking ‘what the heck?’

Of course, that tree, and any others that might arrive this year, aren’t allowed into New Zealand - both the tree and the untreated soil could be harbouring pests or diseases that could harm our primary industries and natural environment.

Particularly concerning is a fungus currently killing fir trees used for Christmas in the United States and Britain. Biosecurity New Zealand, the forestry and horticulture industries clearly don’t want to see this tree fungus or anything like it establish here. 

Image: The little 30cm Christmas tree as it arrived in the post (left) and unwrapped (right).

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz