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Biosecurity News
1 October 2020
Free biosecurity training just for you
1 October 2020
The Primary Industry Training Organisation (ITO), together with the horticulture industry and KVH has developed a biosecurity micro-credential (a short, focused piece of learning) to enhance...
Free biosecurity training just for you
1 October 2020

The Primary Industry Training Organisation (ITO), together with the horticulture industry and KVH has developed a biosecurity micro-credential (a short, focused piece of learning) to enhance biosecurity capability.

The micro-credential content includes biosecurity principles, on-farm practices, and an assessment component. It is designed to give an individual an understanding of biosecurity; what risks are present on their orchard/farm; how to prioritise and manage them; asks how practices can be put in place or improved; and demonstrates how to implement, monitor and review a biosecurity plan.

This Level 5 NZQA qualification is free to you and is being delivered by UCOL on behalf of the Primary ITO. Upcoming courses are in Kerikeri (Friday 9 October), Tauranga (Tuesday 13 October), and Hastings (Monday 19 October).

If you’re interested in enrolling, please get in touch with the Primary ITO on 0800 20 80 20 to secure your spot.

Biosecurity News
1 October 2020
The benefit of constant surveillance
1 October 2020
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has just released their Annual Surveillance report for 2020 which highlights continued significant surveillance efforts across New Zealand to ensure we...
The benefit of constant surveillance
1 October 2020

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has just released their Annual Surveillance report for 2020 which highlights continued significant surveillance efforts across New Zealand to ensure we remain free of unwanted organisms.

General surveillance provides a way for New Zealanders to report suspected plant pests and diseases that are not already present in New Zealand. The report shows it’s been a busy year, with just over 1,000 called made to MPI’s hotline (0800 88 99 66) by the public. This is a slight dip on last year, but not unexpected as both travellers and cargo imports have been impacted due to COVID-19. Of these calls, MPI was able to stand down 26% immediately as no risk was found and 66% required further investigation to understand the level of risk.

As well as general surveillance, MPI runs several targeted surveillance programmes which look at specific high-risk pests such as the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and economically damaging fruit flies, like the Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF).

The national fruit fly trapping network has been running since the mid 1970’s and has successfully detected 12 fruit fly incursions early enough that we were able to eliminate them before they were able to establish. The traps are placed strategically around New Zealand based on several factors, including climate, ports of arrival, suitable hosts, and population density. The most recent response was in 2019 in Auckland and spanned almost a whole year before freedom from QFF was declared. 

During the most recent high-risk fruit fly season there were 2,653 submissions from the traps sent to MPI’s laboratory, involving over 5,000 suspect fruit flies – fortunately, all returned negative. The trapping network is active from late September until early July, with the season running longer in the North due to the warmer climate.

The national BMSB surveillance programme is much newer and was established in the 2018-19 season to provide early detection and monitoring to facilitate eradication should BMSB be detected. The trapping network was increased to 80 trapping sites last season with additional traps in Tauranga (funded by the kiwifruit industry), Napier, and Nelson. The results show 596 samples were submitted, involving 650 stink bug specimens.

One BMSB was detected in the trapping network in March 2020 which resulted in further investigation and determined no further risk. While this find may seem concerning, it helps to highlight the value of such networks in catching BMSB early and allowing swift investigation and management of risk before a population can get hold in the environment or community.

You can read more about all of the above, and much more, in the latest Surveillance Annual Report 2020 on the MPI website.

Biosecurity News
1 October 2020
New Psa management resources
1 October 2020
In the last Bulletin we shared video from the annual Psa R&D update, which saw scientists share with growers and industry key outcomes from the research portfolio, to help with on-orchard Psa...
New Psa management resources
1 October 2020

In the last Bulletin we shared video from the annual Psa R&D update, which saw scientists share with growers and industry key outcomes from the research portfolio, to help with on-orchard Psa disease management programmes.

In conjunction with that event, a Good Practice Workshop was held for growers, so that they could create their own Psa programme, with the support of peers. The workshop used several thought-provoking, constructive and easy-to-follow resources designed to promote conversation and have everyone in the room learning and sharing knowledge gathered from both research and practical experience.

These resources are now available on the KVH website and are freely available to support growers, managers and post-harvest to share practical knowledge with their teams and gain a greater understanding of Psa management activities on-orchard.

There are three new resources that are designed to be used as either a group exercise (they come with a script that explains what to read out to your team) or for individual use, and are mainly photo-based:

  • Psa assessment: a series of photos of typical Psa scenarios that people might come across on-orchard and the things that might need to be considered when making decisions about what to do in each scenario and why.
  • Good management practices: an activity using flashcards that looks at different management practices for controlling Psa and considers which are good, okay, or unacceptable – such as incorrect timing of sprays.
  • Where to cut: a series of photos and symptom information that help with decision making about where to make cuts to remove Psa symptoms.
Biosecurity News
1 October 2020
Fun Fact
1 October 2020
Can you guess how many fruit fly traps there are in New Zealand during the high-risk season? Almost 8,000! New Zealand’s comprehensive fruit fly surveillance programme involves all these traps...
Fun Fact
1 October 2020

Can you guess how many fruit fly traps there are in New Zealand during the high-risk season? Almost 8,000!

New Zealand’s comprehensive fruit fly surveillance programme involves all these traps being checked fortnightly (starting October and continuing through until July) for early detection of potential breeding populations and uses three different pheromone trap lures.

The traps are placed in potential host trees and arranged in a specific pattern to cover areas identified as likely points of entry and detection because of their vicinity to international air and sea ports, presence of host material, and habitat suitability (temperature in particular).

During the high-risk season for fruit fly KVH publishes monthly updates about any fruit fly finds and new responses to detections either in New Zealand or our closest neighbours, Australia. These are available on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
1 October 2020
You're invited to the Kiwifruit Biosecurity Industry Day
1 October 2020
KVH and Zespri are hosting the annual Kiwifruit Biosecurity Industry Day on Wednesday 4 November 2020. Open to growers and anyone in the industry interested in learning more about initiatives...
You're invited to the Kiwifruit Biosecurity Industry Day
1 October 2020

KVH and Zespri are hosting the annual Kiwifruit Biosecurity Industry Day on Wednesday 4 November 2020.

Open to growers and anyone in the industry interested in learning more about initiatives underway to better manage biosecurity risk to the New Zealand kiwifruit industry, the day will feature a series of presentations including an overview of the proposed new Pathway Management Plan and a look at supporting research into pollen and compost, plus the role of KVH in the wider biosecurity system including GIA (the Government Industry Agreement for Biosecurity Readiness and Response) and the border.

Local and international research supported by KVH and Zespri into key risks for the New Zealand kiwifruit industry will be discussed.  

KVH will share what happens with unusual symptom reports and the day will close with a demonstration of the popular Find A Pest app that uses innovative technologies and scientist’s expertise to help users identify and notify potential pests.

Come along to see and hear all the latest news – this event sold out last year so get in quick to save your spot. To those of you who wish to attend online, this is also an option and once you register a link will be sent to you prior to the event.

Where: Trustpower Arena, Baypark, 81 Truman Lane, Mount Maunganui
When: Wednesday 4 November 2020, 9.00am – 1.00pm including morning tea RSVP: Online here

Biosecurity News
1 October 2020
Early protection important to protect flowerbuds
1 October 2020
Recent research presentations alerted growers of the need for strong Psa protection programmes, both at budbreak and through the early weeks of canopy development. For both Hayward and Gold3,...
Early protection important to protect flowerbuds
1 October 2020

Recent research presentations alerted growers of the need for strong Psa protection programmes, both at budbreak and through the early weeks of canopy development.

For both Hayward and Gold3, flower-buds were seen to become infected as early as 1-2 weeks after budbreak if innoculum is present. Infection risk ramps up with rainfall, and strong winds similarly add risk. Flower-bud infections only become visible 2-3 weeks after infection, with browning of flower sepals becoming visible.

We know Psa moves from outside the flower-bud into internal flower parts, so a regime to minimise innoculum early must be in place and should include monitoring to identify Psa hot spots, removal of infected material, and the use of an integrated spray programme using products which match the orchard risk.

Many canopies now have leaf size sufficient for application of the elicitor Actigard, and for sites where challenge of Psa is high, bactericides can be considered.

Ongoing copper rounds are needed to protect the rapidly expanding young canopy tissue.

A list of current protective spray products is available on the KVH website here.

Biosecurity News
17 September 2020
Reminder of pruning and tying down timeline
17 September 2020
Growers are reminded that one of the requirements within the National Psa-V Pest Management Plan (NPMP) is that orchards are pruned and tied down by 1 October yearly.  KVH is aware that pruning...
Reminder of pruning and tying down timeline
17 September 2020

Growers are reminded that one of the requirements within the National Psa-V Pest Management Plan (NPMP) is that orchards are pruned and tied down by 1 October yearly.  KVH is aware that pruning and tying down is being completed on some orchards. If an orchardist or orchard manager thinks they are unlikely to meet the 1 October timeframe, contact us by email so that we are aware of your situation and can discuss and agree a way forward.

Biosecurity News
17 September 2020
Free orchard signage
17 September 2020
Good biosecurity practice includes managing risk by restricting access to orchards. As part of this you should check contact details on your orchard gate signs are up to date. Orchard visitors,...
Free orchard signage
17 September 2020

Good biosecurity practice includes managing risk by restricting access to orchards. As part of this you should check contact details on your orchard gate signs are up to date.

Orchard visitors, harvest staff, and contractors need to know and follow your hygiene requirements.

KVH has produced signage highlighting the need for visitors to make contact before entering and the biosecurity risk posed by plant, vehicle, and people movements. If you would like new signs, they are available free of charge from KVH by phoning 0800 665 825 or feel free to contact us by email.

Biosecurity News
17 September 2020
Biosecurity agenda at international kiwifruit meeting
17 September 2020
KVH Chief Executive Stu Hutchings discussed New Zealand’s biosecurity activities at the International Kiwifruit Organisation (IKO) virtual meeting yesterday. Also attended by NZKGI and...
Biosecurity agenda at international kiwifruit meeting
17 September 2020

KVH Chief Executive Stu Hutchings discussed New Zealand’s biosecurity activities at the International Kiwifruit Organisation (IKO) virtual meeting yesterday.

Also attended by NZKGI and Zespri representatives, the annual meeting provides an opportunity for international counterparts from countries where kiwifruit is grown to share news and opportunities. Stu provided an update about progress in managing Psa in New Zealand and provided a summary of the 2019/20 season.

As part of the meeting, Stu also updated attendees on the proposed new Pathway Management Plan currently being consulted on with growers and industry, the 2019/20 successful Auckland fruit fly response, outcomes of the latest Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) research from Italy, and emerging high-risk pests and diseases for kiwifruit.

Biosecurity News
17 September 2020
Spreading the stink bug message
17 September 2020
KVH is involved in several initiatives to improve awareness and readiness for the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), including a comprehensive public education programme alongside Biosecurity New...
Spreading the stink bug message
17 September 2020

KVH is involved in several initiatives to improve awareness and readiness for the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), including a comprehensive public education programme alongside Biosecurity New Zealand and other horticultural groups known as the BMSB Council.

The campaign for the current high-risk season aims to lift public awareness around the damaging impacts of BMSB and increase the likelihood of early detection through passive surveillance.

KVH is co-funding the campaign, key aspects of which include print advertising in gardening magazines and grower publications (timed to coincide with peak holiday periods when people are in gardens and likely to spot BMSB outside); digital advertising to target online shoppers (such as those using Amazon, eBay and AliExpress) and people watching TV programmes around things like border security; and MetService ads which have been high-performing ads for us in previous years.

This year we’ll also be sponsoring an evening on television channel Choice TV, to capture the audience that may not be reached via digital. This works with sponsoring an evening’s viewing by getting ads in between programmes, and then pop ups during shows on that evening. We’re looking to sponsor an evening that focuses on DIY, gardening, outdoors, home shows etc (which is common on Choice).

The new season’s BMSB flyers and posters will be available shortly, and will be added to the stink bug page of the
KVH website.

Biosecurity News
17 September 2020
Fun Fact
17 September 2020
The Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) jumps more than it flies. At just one inch long, an adult SLF can jump three metres. Three metres!! That’s why their wings are often closed. They rarely need to...
Fun Fact
17 September 2020

The Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) jumps more than it flies. At just one inch long, an adult SLF can jump three metres. Three metres!!

That’s why their wings are often closed. They rarely need to use them because their quad strength is apparently unparalleled.

The SLF is an emerging biosecurity threat to kiwifruit and many other horticultural industries. The pest is hard to control and is a proven invader, capable of flying out of orchards and returning later, and hitchhiking on inanimate objects.

How could it get to New Zealand? The SLF lays its eggs in clusters on smooth surfaces (including vehicles and machinery, shipping containers, and garden furniture) and covers them with a protective layer of wax. The eggs can then hitchhike on these and other imported commodities. See more on the SLF page of the KVH website here.

Biosecurity News
17 September 2020
Biosecurity micro-credential enrolments open now
17 September 2020
The Primary Industry Training Organisation (ITO), together with the horticulture industry and KVH has developed a biosecurity micro-credential (a short, focused piece of learning) to enhance industry...
Biosecurity micro-credential enrolments open now
17 September 2020

The Primary Industry Training Organisation (ITO), together with the horticulture industry and KVH has developed a biosecurity micro-credential (a short, focused piece of learning) to enhance industry capability.  

The micro-credential content includes biosecurity principles, on-farm practices, and an assessment component. It is designed to give an individual an understanding of biosecurity; what risks are present on their orchard/farm; how to prioritise and manage them; asks how practices can be put in place or improved; and demonstrates how to implement, monitor and review a biosecurity plan.

This Level 5 NZQA qualification is free to you and is being delivered by UCOL on behalf of the Primary ITO. Upcoming courses are in Kerikeri (Friday 9 October), Tauranga (Tuesday 13 October), and Hastings (Monday 19 October).

If you’re interested in enrolling, please get in touch with the Primary ITO on 0800 20 80 20 to secure your spot.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz