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Biosecurity News
12 November 2020
Linda Peacock a Syngenta award finalist
12 November 2020
Amid improved agri conditions, a complicated global market and a pandemic, and in the face of a changing climate, there has never been a more important time to promote leadership in agriculture,...
Linda Peacock a Syngenta award finalist
12 November 2020

Amid improved agri conditions, a complicated global market and a pandemic, and in the face of a changing climate, there has never been a more important time to promote leadership in agriculture, according to Syngenta’s Paul Luxton, who today announced the 26 regional finalists of the 2020 Growth Awards.

Our very own Linda Peacock, Industry Liaison & Technical Specialist here at KVH, is one of the finalists with the independent judging panel saying they were impressed with her contributions to the agriculture industry and her thoughtful responses to their questions. Congratulations Linda!

The Syngenta Growth Awards recognise leading growers and farm advisers from different regions across Australia and New Zealand, showcasing their contribution to the industry. Nominations were by invitation and the 26 finalists will go onto the final stage of judging, with overall winners to be announced early next year.

Mr Luxton is the managing director and country head of Syngenta for Australia and New Zealand and said recognising individuals who were leading the way in agriculture was vital to the future of the sector across the two countries.

Nominees were asked to complete a series of challenging questions designed not only to demonstrate their achievements and their expertise, but to uncover their views about collaboration across the industry.

Read more from Syngenta, and see profiles on Linda and the other regional finalists here.

Biosecurity News
12 November 2020
Biosecurity matters: Darshan and his family tell us why
12 November 2020
The kiwifruit industry has a new video star in Hume Pack-N-Cool’s Darshan Singh, who features in the industry’s latest contribution to the national Ko Tātou This Is Us biosecurity...
Biosecurity matters: Darshan and his family tell us why
12 November 2020

The kiwifruit industry has a new video star in Hume Pack-N-Cool’s Darshan Singh, who features in the industry’s latest contribution to the national Ko Tātou This Is Us biosecurity campaign.

KVH worked with Darshan and his family to produce the clip on their five-hectare Katikati orchard, championing why we want to keep harmful pests and diseases away. In the video, Darshan talks about how growing kiwifruit has been a way of life for his family for a long time and they have enjoyed the benefits that have come along with it – biosecurity is important so that this success continues for future generations he says. 

You can see the new video on the KVH YouTube channel, and KVH/Zespri social media as well as Ko Tātou This Is Us social media sites and advertising.

Biosecurity News
12 November 2020
Industry biosecurity day a success
12 November 2020
Last week there were several biosecurity events held during the region’s Biosecurity Week. On Wednesday, KVH and Zespri jointly hosted a Kiwifruit Biosecurity Industry Day, providing the...
Industry biosecurity day a success
12 November 2020

Last week there were several biosecurity events held during the region’s Biosecurity Week. On Wednesday, KVH and Zespri jointly hosted a Kiwifruit Biosecurity Industry Day, providing the opportunity for everyone to learn more about work underway to protect the industry from unwanted pests and diseases.

Key research findings, and practical examples of research the industry has been taking part in were discussed, particularly around one of our highest risk threats, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).  Sonia Whiteman from Zespri gave an interesting presentation about latest learnings on BMSB biology and impacts from trials in Italy, and Gonzalo Avila from Plant & Food Research explained trials underway in China and the USA to learn more about the promising biocontrol the Samurai Wasp. The information from these trials is fundamental to developing and putting in place an effective release plan for the wasp, should we ever need it in response to BMSB in New Zealand.

Biosecurity responses were discussed at a national level by John Walsh from Biosecurity New Zealand, who spoke about the different parts of the New Zealand biosecurity system and explained how they all fit together to ensure there are numerous intervention points that either stop biosecurity risk getting here, or capture and manage the risk that does make it to our shores and past our borders.

John also discussed with the audience the importance of surveillance for early detection of pests and diseases – vital for any successful response. As well as the specialised, targeted surveillance and trapping programmes in place across New Zealand (read more about this in the KVH Annual Update here) the general surveillance undertaken by growers greatly increases our chances of detecting harmful threats early enough to do something about them.

KVH’s Erin Lane and Linda Peacock delved into this area in more detail, with a presentation on the importance of reporting unusual symptoms seen on orchards. There have been 37 reports of unusual symptoms reported to KVH so far this year, which were summarised on the day, including case studies of how investigations take place and exactly what happens after a report is made. You can read more about unusual symptoms, and see details of recent reports, on the KVH website here.

What we know - and the knowledge gaps we’re aware need to be filled by science and research – about kiwifruit trunk diseases and the topical Kiwifruit Vine Decline Syndrome, were discussed in light of the unusual symptoms they display. By being aware of what is normal on the orchard helps to quickly identify what is out of the ordinary and a potential sign of infection.

In support of reporting the unusual, the day ended with a demonstration of a new app to make it easier to identify potential pests and weeds. The Find-A-Pest app is free and easy to use with observations made simply by clicking the camera button or via one of the factsheets which highlight particular species of interest to the kiwifruit industry. Read more about the app and how the kiwifruit industry can make best use of it here.

Videos from the day can be watched on the KVH YouTube channel here and the individual PowerPoint presentations can be viewed below:

·         The biosecurity system is ready to respond – John Walsh, Biosecurity New Zealand

·         A partnership approach for our high-risk pests - Matt Dyck, KVH

·         Optimising innovation across the biosecurity landscape - David Teulon, B3

·         BMSB impacts and biology - Sonia Whiteman, Zespri

·         Biocontrol preparedness for BMSB - Gonzalo Avila, Plant & Food Research

·         Understanding biosecurity risk of key orchard inputs - Kerry Everett, Plant & Food Research

·         Reporting the unusual: what does this mean? - Erin Lane and Linda Peacock, KVH

·         Kiwifruit Trunk Diseases: understanding our biodiversity and risk - Joy Tyson, Plant & Food Research

·         Kiwifruit Vine Decline Syndrome: what it is and isn’t - Sonia Whiteman, Zespri

·         Training on how to use Find-A-Pest - Claire Stewart, Scion and Erin Lane, KVH

Biosecurity News
29 October 2020
Stopping the stinkers
29 October 2020
The latest rules for importing goods from countries with Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) were released in time for the start of the 2020/21 high-risk season, with the updated import health standard...
Stopping the stinkers
29 October 2020

The latest rules for importing goods from countries with Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) were released in time for the start of the 2020/21 high-risk season, with the updated import health standard for vehicles, machinery and parts coming into force 1 September.

The standard increases the number of countries subject to offshore management requirements for vehicles, machinery and parts. Following discussions with Australian officials, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Portugal and Ukraine have been added to the list of BMSB risk countries, which now numbers 37.

Imports from countries on the list must be treated before they get to New Zealand unless they have been through an approved offshore system to manage BMSB and general biosecurity risk.

Following discussions with industry, some low-risk new commodities, may be exempt from these requirements. The items include small vehicle types, machinery, parts, watercraft and tyres. These commodities are usually manufactured and stored inside, reducing the chance of picking up hitchhikers. Importers will need to submit a manufacturer’s declaration to show the goods meet storage and other requirements.

Biosecurity New Zealand has also extended the requirement for all sea containers from Italy to undergo offshore treatment before arrival until at least the end of the 2022 season.

In terms of border operations for the 2020/21 season, more checks to measure compliance with import rules have been introduced. While the focus is high-risk cargo that could hide aggregations of BMSB, there will be more checks of lower-risk types of cargo too. For example, Biosecurity New Zealand will be auditing freight from countries currently not on the above-mentioned list of 37 and there will also be more scrutiny of cargo exempt from treatment.

A handy infographic has been put together to help show how New Zealand is blocking stink bugs from entering New Zealand across different border pathways. You can view the infographic here.

Biosecurity News
29 October 2020
Coming soon to your screens
29 October 2020
The weather’s great, the orchard’s green, and the family’s keen – it’s the perfect time for some filming! We’ve been out with Darshan from Hume Pack-N-Cool...
Coming soon to your screens
29 October 2020


The weather’s great, the orchard’s green, and the family’s keen – it’s the perfect time for some filming!

We’ve been out with Darshan from Hume Pack-N-Cool producing a brand new kiwifruit industry contribution to the national Ko Tātou This Is Us biosecurity campaign, championing the importance of good biosecurity to protect our family orchards, homes, and businesses now and into the future. Watch this space as the final product won’t be far away.

You can watch our first industry video for Ko Tātou This Is Us on our YouTube channel. It features Campbell Wood from Pivot Horticulture who talks about his passion for growing kiwifruit, and how important biosecurity is to orchard owners and managers like him.

Biosecurity News
29 October 2020
Re-thinking mail biosecurity
29 October 2020
New Zealand Post is shifting its international mail operations to a brand-new processing centre, which has created the opportunity for Biosecurity New Zealand to rethink biosecurity management for...
Re-thinking mail biosecurity
29 October 2020

New Zealand Post is shifting its international mail operations to a brand-new processing centre, which has created the opportunity for Biosecurity New Zealand to rethink biosecurity management for this pathway.

Scheduled to open in 2023, the new centre will be based in Wiri, some 7km from the existing location near Auckland Airport.

Biosecurity New Zealand are working with New Zealand Post and other border agencies to determine what can be done to ensure a smarter approach to meet the challenge of ever-increasing risk from rising mail volumes and changing biosecurity threats. This means moving from an existing resource intensive approach to one that takes advantage of intelligence tools and the latest screening technology.

The installation of 3D scanners (six at this stage) has been proposed, which will allow automatic detection of risk goods. Our Australian counterparts have already developed algorithms to detect meat and seafood in mail and they’re currently working on software to detect live animals and other plant material. The prospect for automatic detection of seeds is also looking good. In addition, the Australian trials show 3D technology is nearly seven times better at detecting risk items than the existing 2D x-ray gear.

The proposed new approach will also use advanced data screening of mail items to identify biosecurity threats. Conversely, the approach will also identify items or consignments that have zero biosecurity risk.  This information will allow Biosecurity New Zealand to target interventions where they can be most effective.

Biosecurity News
29 October 2020
Your free 2021 calendar
29 October 2020
If you or your organisation would like one of the fantastic, bright and colourful Port of Tauranga Biosecurity Excellence 2021 unwanted pest calendars (created by KVH, Biosecurity New Zealand and the...
Your free 2021 calendar
29 October 2020

If you or your organisation would like one of the fantastic, bright and colourful Port of Tauranga Biosecurity Excellence 2021 unwanted pest calendars (created by KVH, Biosecurity New Zealand and the Port of Tauranga) send us an email letting us know your postal address and we’ll get one in the mail to you.

We’ll also have the calendars at all next week’s Biosecurity Week events so be sure to collect one if you’re coming along.

Biosecurity News
29 October 2020
Fun Fact
29 October 2020
Did you know Biosecurity New Zealand was the first organisation in the southern hemisphere to train stink bug dogs? The dogs play a vital part in keeping Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) at bay....
Fun Fact
29 October 2020

Did you know Biosecurity New Zealand was the first organisation in the southern hemisphere to train stink bug dogs?

The dogs play a vital part in keeping Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) at bay. There are currently three trained sniffers – Georgie, Nova and Bodie – who will soon be joined by two more – Yamba and Ally.

The stink bug sniffers are used to carry out surveillance of international mail and airfreight. Dog teams also make weekly visits to four airfreight facilities with high import volumes. Other facilities get screened monthly or quarterly, depending on import volume.

Stink bug dogs are recruited from existing detector dog ranks or the pound. New Zealand’s training programme began in 2017 and the Australians followed suit in 2018.

Image: Georgie, one of three trained BMSB sniffers, demonstrates her bug-sniffing skills.

Biosecurity News
29 October 2020
Woolly Nightshade wipeout month
29 October 2020
As an extension of the upcoming Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital Biosecurity Week, Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC) are running a campaign to encourage both the public and landowners to do...
Woolly Nightshade wipeout month
29 October 2020

As an extension of the upcoming Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital Biosecurity Week, Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC) are running a campaign to encourage both the public and landowners to do their bit in order to stop the spread of Woolly Nightshade by pulling out seedlings and controlling mature plants.

This highly invasive weed is a host of passion vine hopper, which causes sooty mould to develop on fruit – a significant reject factor reducing kiwifruit orchard returns. Shelter belts need to be free of weeds that cause problems in the orchard and Woolly Nightshade is easy to kill. We encourage you to get involved in this region-wide campaign - read more about it here and send in a couple of photos of your control work in action to info@boprc.govt.nz to be recognised for your efforts.

Biosecurity News
29 October 2020
Two new Psa positive detections in Whangarei Containment region
29 October 2020
Last week KVH carried out the annual Psa monitoring round in Whangarei. Samples were taken from five orchards. Three of these returned Not Detected for Psa. Samples from two orchards in the...
Two new Psa positive detections in Whangarei Containment region
29 October 2020

Last week KVH carried out the annual Psa monitoring round in Whangarei.

Samples were taken from five orchards. Three of these returned Not Detected for Psa.

Samples from two orchards in the Glenbervie area were confirmed Psa positive by Hill Laboratories testing - bringing the number of positive orchards in this region to 11. Whangarei remains a Containment region with controls in place to protect Psa non-detected growers in the region.

Growers in Whangarei and other regions with Psa Not Detected orchards should be monitoring regularly to identify any symptoms.

This is the highest risk time of year for Psa infection, so it is important to maintain a good protectant spray programme and good hygiene practices. Refer to the KVH Psa-V Seasonal Management Wall Chart  for which sprays to use when, and use the KVH Psa Risk Model to get information on risk levels from upcoming weather events.

As casual staff may be moving between orchards ensure tools are sanitised and good people hygiene is observed, and any non-essential vehicles are kept out of the orchard production area.

Biosecurity News
29 October 2020
In the news
29 October 2020
Live fruit fly larvae found in imported watermelon: Imports of watermelon from Tonga have been suspended after live fruit fly larvae were detected at the New Zealand border. The Ministry for Primary...
In the news
29 October 2020

Live fruit fly larvae found in imported watermelon: Imports of watermelon from Tonga have been suspended after live fruit fly larvae were detected at the New Zealand border. The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) said the Pacific fruit fly larvae were detected in a consignment of watermelons during an inspection at the Ports of Auckland. This is a good example of effective border inspection working to help prevent fruit fly establishing in New Zealand.

The fall and rise of the gold kiwifruit: New Zealand is the third largest producer of kiwifruit in the world behind China and Italy, and despite the global pandemic, kiwifruit exports have shown no sign of slowing but in November 2010, the industry was ravaged by the bacterial disease Psa which spread like wildfire.

 
Biosecurity News
29 October 2020
Wild kiwifruit control agreement
29 October 2020
KVH and the Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC) have today formally agreed to continue to jointly manage wild kiwifruit plants in the Bay of Plenty region. The agreement has a value for Council...
Wild kiwifruit control agreement
29 October 2020

KVH and the Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC) have today formally agreed to continue to jointly manage wild kiwifruit plants in the Bay of Plenty region.

The agreement has a value for Council assistance of up to $1m in today’s dollars, over a 10-year term.

Wild kiwifruit plants establish through birds feeding on softened fruit and distributing seeds into nearby gullies or forestry blocks.  Uncontrolled, the wild plants and vines can reduce the biodiversity value of native bush or the productive value of forestry.  Wild vines can also host pests of kiwifruit, such as Psa, which left unmanaged, can multiply and harm commercial orchards.

The kiwifruit industry has partnered with BOPRC on wild kiwifruit plant management since 1998, and the partnership
is seen as an exemplar for how local government and industry can successfully work together on pest management. The BOPRC leads surveillance and mapping of wild kiwifruit plant infestations, while KVH – representing the kiwifruit industry – leads overall management and administration and has,
with support from Zespri and other industry contributors, committed to contributing at least 1.5 times the dollar contribution from Council over the next decade.

Landowners are also an important partner in the programme and co-fund control of wild kiwifruit plants through the programme.

Read more on the KVH website about management of wild kiwifruit plants, and how KVH works with all regional councils in kiwifruit growing regions.   

Image: Wild kiwifruit vines amongst pine trees in a Bay of Plenty forestry block.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz