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Biosecurity News
25 June 2020
Deadline for removing unpicked fruit
25 June 2020
Growers are reminded that unpicked kiwifruit must be removed from vines by 1 July. Unpicked fruit can increase the amount of wild kiwifruit plants establishing in nearby areas of native bush or...
Deadline for removing unpicked fruit
25 June 2020

Growers are reminded that unpicked kiwifruit must be removed from vines by 1 July.

Unpicked fruit can increase the amount of wild kiwifruit plants establishing in nearby areas of native bush or forestry as a result of birds feeding on this fruit and transporting the seed. Unmanaged vines (including those with unpicked fruit) may also be a potential host for plant disease organisms.

From 1 July KVH will follow-up on reports of unpicked fruit with orchard owners and post-harvest companies. Read more here.

Biosecurity News
25 June 2020
Grafting? Protect your investment
25 June 2020
A reminder to all growers considering grafting this winter to protect their orchard investments by following biosecurity protocols. These apply whether grafting one plant, one hectare or a whole new...
Grafting? Protect your investment
25 June 2020

A reminder to all growers considering grafting this winter to protect their orchard investments by following biosecurity protocols. These apply whether grafting one plant, one hectare or a whole new development block.

·         Select budwood from within your own orchard or if this is not possible, source from a budwood supplier who is registered with KVH.

·         KPINs supplying budwood off their orchard must register annually with KVH and complete a simple budwood risk management plan.

·         Budwood can be moved between properties owned by the same legal entity within the same Psa region. Contact KVH for all other movements – permissions may be required.

·         Traceability of plant material is important. Keep records of budwood source and where budwood is used. An orchard map is a good way of plotting this and meeting GAP requirements.

·         All other distributors of budwood, such as pack-houses and grafters should check their requirements with KVH. Email info@kvh.org.nz or phone 0800 665 825.

Biosecurity News
25 June 2020
Community biosecurity protects our kiwifruit
25 June 2020
Everyone connected to the kiwifruit industry can help protect what we’ve got and keep unwanted pests and diseases away. A new booklet from KVH provides guidance about how everyone in or close...
Community biosecurity protects our kiwifruit
25 June 2020

Everyone connected to the kiwifruit industry can help protect what we’ve got and keep unwanted pests and diseases away.

A new booklet from KVH provides guidance about how everyone in or close to the kiwifruit community can help identify biosecurity risks and address them. The bright, colourful guide is split into four easy sections detailing how everyone can:

1.      Keep watch (what to look out for and what big biosecurity responses cost if we don’t keep our eyes and ears peeled)

2.      Check and clean (how to look out for new pests on orchards or in gardens)

3.      Report the unusual (how to make a report and what happens next)

4.      Lead by example (what everyone can do at work, home and school to always be biosecurity aware).

The importance and enormity of the biosecurity task means that it is vital everyone pitches in and has accountability for keeping out pest and disease threats that could severely impact the kiwifruit industry and have flow-on effects for our livelihoods, and our communities. If the next big threat is here, undetected and spreading everyone has the power to protect what we’ve got with the easy steps covered in this booklet. 

The Kiwifruit Community Biosecurity Booklet is free and available from KVH website and will be distributed at ongoing industry events, as well as during community initiatives in growing regions such as the upcoming Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital Biosecurity week.

Biosecurity News
25 June 2020
Calling all biosecurity champions
25 June 2020
It takes all of us to protect what we've got but there are a few champions worth celebrating – could this be you or someone you know? If so, it’s time to shine a light on achievements...
Calling all biosecurity champions
25 June 2020

It takes all of us to protect what we've got but there are a few champions worth celebrating – could this be you or someone you know? If so, it’s time to shine a light on achievements with the upcoming 2020 New Zealand Biosecurity Awards.

These awards recognise the incredible individuals and teams who are working hard to help ensure our country and its unique environment is safe from pests and diseases through their contributions to biosecurity – in our communities, businesses, iwi and hapū, in the bush and in our backyards.

The kiwifruit industry has been well represented in the past with KVH winning an award, and KiwiNet (the industry’s network of biosecurity champions) being selected as a finalist last year, and we’d love to see that success continue!

Entries open next Wednesday 1 July and close at 5pm Thursday 30 July. Visit the Ko Tātou This Is Us website to find out more and enter online.

Biosecurity News
25 June 2020
Watch USA experts talk about controlling BMSB
25 June 2020
Back in February KVH ran its six monthly KiwiNet workshop, including a special session with international guest speaker Kim Hoelmer and his research colleague Elijah Talamas. They were in New...
Watch USA experts talk about controlling BMSB
25 June 2020

Back in February KVH ran its six monthly KiwiNet workshop, including a special session with international guest speaker Kim Hoelmer and his research colleague Elijah Talamas.

They were in New Zealand speaking to several audiences about Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and their filmed technical talks are now freely available to watch.

Kim is an entomologist and researcher from the Agricultural Research Service at the US Department of Agriculture, specialising in biological control of BMSB. During their presentations, Kim and Elijah talk about the arrival and spread of BMSB in the USA, its range of impacts, and natural enemies - particularly the Samurai Wasp, which is being used in the USA as a biological control and has now established itself in 13 states.

·         Click here to watch Kim’s presentation on biocontrol and management of BMSB.

·         Click here to watch Elijah’s presentation on the taxonomy of scelionid wasps (parasitoids) and their role in control of stink bugs.

·         Click here to watch Kim’s extra presentation on the risks posed by Spotted Lanternfly, and management of Spotted Wing Drosophila. 

The talks are from technical experts and extensive so a reminder that if you prefer, Kim and Elijah’s presentation slides are also available to browse through on the KiwiNet page of the KVH website here.

Biosecurity News
25 June 2020
In the news
25 June 2020
Pandemics. What can we learn from New Zealand’s biosecurity system? David Teulon from Better Border Biosecurity says moving forward, an important question raised by COVID-19 now facing New...
In the news
25 June 2020

Pandemics. What can we learn from New Zealand’s biosecurity system?
David Teulon from Better Border Biosecurity says moving forward, an important question raised by COVID-19 now facing New Zealand is how will the country be able to interact with the outside world without risking further infection?

While the potential impacts from human epidemics can be very different, we can look to how our country has dealt with challenges posed by biosecurity threats to our plant and animal systems. 

Biosecurity News
16 June 2020
Biosecurity 2025
16 June 2020
Biosecurity 2025 is a national partnership between people, organisations, Maori, and central, local and regional government. It's aim is to make our biosecurity system more resilient and...
Biosecurity 2025
16 June 2020

Biosecurity 2025 is a national partnership between people, organisations, Maori, and central, local and regional government. It's aim is to make our biosecurity system more resilient and future-focused to protect our taonga and New Zealand from pests and diseases.

KVH is a key partner in Biosecurity 2025 and there are a number of kiwifruit industry, community, and regional initiatives KVH helps drive that are part of this national strategy.

Ko Tātou This Is Us
Biosecurity keeps our incredible home safe from pests and diseases. Ko Tātou This Is Us asks us to take a moment to think about how biosecurity protects our way of life, the outdoor environment where we fish, farm, hunt and explore, the beautiful biodiversity of our unique ecosystem and even the food we eat.

Every New Zealander has a role to play in preventing pests and diseases from getting here or helping to stop their spread if they do arrive. It takes all of us to protect what we’ve got. View the video below and visit the Ko Tātou This Is Us website to learn more.

KVH produces resources that help every person with a connection to the kiwifruit industry know that they also have a special role in managing the threat of unwanted pests and diseases. 

 

Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) 
This is a collaboration between Tauranga Moana iwi, local industries and business, science institutions, educators, central and local government. Its purpose is leading and taking collaborative action towards biosecurity excellence.

This coalition is an exemplar for regional collaboration and partnership - it is an example of Ko Tātou This Is Us in action, building a biosecurity team of 4.7 million New Zealanders.

Our TMBC focus is on working with rangatahi in partnerships with educators; connecting our communities to the importance of biosecurity; and building collaboration across iwi, hapu, community organisations, industries, science and Matauranga Maori experts, central government and local government to achieve biosecurity excellence. Visit the TMBC website to learn more.

Biosecurity Excellence at the Port of Tauranga
This award-winning partnership was formed in 2014 between the Port, several primary industries, and central and local government agencies to prevent and respond to biosecurity risks through the Port of Tauranga.

All groups have come together with the goal of having no incursions through the Port. This is achieved by working collaboratively and being  committed to biosecurity excellence, through effective biosecurity awareness and the use of the very best tools and technologies, backed by science.

Biosecurity News
11 June 2020
Be on the lookout for BMSB over winter
11 June 2020
The high-risk season may be over, but this is a pest that infests homes, hibernates inside them over winter, and is almost impossible to get rid of. If you see a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB),...
Be on the lookout for BMSB over winter
11 June 2020

The high-risk season may be over, but this is a pest that infests homes, hibernates inside them over winter, and is almost impossible to get rid of. If you see a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), don’t kill it. Catch it, take a photo, and report it.

Watch the short winter campaign video hosted by Ruud ‘the Bug Man’ Kleinpaste and share it with friends and family to keep up the profile of this unwanted pest over the coming winter months.

Biosecurity News
11 June 2020
New Waihi weather station
11 June 2020
In a recent Bulletin we announced we were after a new home for the Waihi weather station to support local growers and had great feedback from several people putting their hands up to be hosts (thanks...
New Waihi weather station
11 June 2020

In a recent Bulletin we announced we were after a new home for the Waihi weather station to support local growers and had great feedback from several people putting their hands up to be hosts (thanks to you all).

After assessment and a site visit to discuss suitability, the station was set up late last week at its new home on Waihi Beach Road. This new location is very close to the original site which will mean excellent continuity of collected data.

The station is part of our network across the country, feeding data into our online Weather & Disease Portal to provide customised weather information, disease information and interpretations. If you haven’t already signed up to use the model you can do so on the KVH website here.

Biosecurity News
11 June 2020
Kill a large woolly nightshade in 60 seconds
11 June 2020
Shelterbelts need to be free of weeds that cause problems in the orchard.  KVH has regularly alerted orchardists to get rid of weeds such as moth plant, woolly nightshade and pampas, all...
Kill a large woolly nightshade in 60 seconds
11 June 2020

Shelterbelts need to be free of weeds that cause problems in the orchard. 

KVH has regularly alerted orchardists to get rid of weeds such as moth plant, woolly nightshade and pampas, all native to South America and hosts of the Australian insect passion vine hopper, which causes sooty mould to develop on fruit – a significant reject factor reducing kiwifruit orchard returns.

Woolly nightshade is easy to kill.  If your orchard is organic, use a tractor and snig chain to pull the entire plant from the ground. Use a spade to dig out seedlings or any broken off roots.

For non-organic properties, a short KVH video of the ‘cut and inject’ method can be seen here. This method is fast, effective, safe, and cheap.  Even a large 4m high woolly nightshade can be treated in about a minute – it will be dead two to eight weeks later (two weeks in summer and up to eight weeks in winter). 

Use a machete or tomahawk to make downward cuts around the entire circumference of the tree.  The cuts do not need to join up, but they do need to go all the way around the trunk and be as close to ground level as possible.  Using a stock syringe gun (or oil can), gently squirt 2 to 3mls of undiluted Glyphosate herbicide into the cuts.  The herbicide will translocate throughout the tree and in the winter, kill it within two months.

In some valleys adjacent to kiwifruit orchards there are forests of woolly nightshade.  Killing them standing up using the cut and inject method is best as you can easily move around the upright dead tree frames to pull seedlings. Providing you pull seedlings at six monthly intervals you will completely remove the woolly nightshade forest.  Think about planting the area in native plants or a tree crop to prevent other weeds from establishing.

If you require further advice about killing woolly nightshade or other weeds in or near kiwifruit orchards, contact John Mather at KVH (on 0800 665 825 or info@kvh.org.nz) or your local Regional Council. 

Biosecurity News
28 May 2020
Keep up with biosecurity when replacing plants or planting new blocks
28 May 2020
Winter is the time when growers look to replace plants on their orchards or plant new blocks. This article is a reminder that if these plants are being moved between properties there are biosecurity...
Keep up with biosecurity when replacing plants or planting new blocks
28 May 2020

Winter is the time when growers look to replace plants on their orchards or plant new blocks. This article is a reminder that if these plants are being moved between properties there are biosecurity requirements that must be met to reduce the likelihood of spreading pests and diseases including Psa.

As a general rule, plants may only be sourced from nurseries that meet the requirements of the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS). There are two types of these nurseries – both are listed on the KVH website.

1.      Full certification plants: these are plants that are free of Psa and other target organisms. Nurseries with these plants have demonstrated the ability to keep Psa out of their growing environment (either through growing in a fully enclosed greenhouse or by being located in an Exclusion region where there is no Psa) and plants have tested Psa Not Detected. 

2.      Restricted certification plants: these are plants that may have the common New Zealand form of Psa (Psa-V) but are free of non-New Zealand and resistant strains of Psa.

The only exception is Grow for Your Own Use, where plants are being grown for use on another property (or properties) under the same ownership within the same Psa region. In this case up to 1000 plants per year can be moved between these properties. Growers using this option must register with KVH and submit a KVH Psa-V Risk Management Plan - Growing Rootstock for your own use.

Plants displaying symptoms are not to be moved and both the nursery and recipient are to maintain traceability records should symptoms develop at a later stage and tracing be required.   

Please contact KVH on 0800 665 825 if you would like more information about the requirements.

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Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz