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Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Kiwifruit's Most Unwanted updated and out now
22 August 2019
KVH regularly talks about fruit fly being our number one threat closely followed by the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), but how are these rankings assigned? We’ve developed a risk matrix...
Kiwifruit's Most Unwanted updated and out now
22 August 2019

KVH regularly talks about fruit fly being our number one threat closely followed by the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), but how are these rankings assigned?

We’ve developed a risk matrix to provide a structured and objective method of prioritising threat organisms into a shorter list for the purpose of readiness and response planning.

The organisms that are considered the highest risk make up Kiwifruit's Most Unwanted. This is based on the likelihood of them entering and establishing in New Zealand, and the potential production and market access impacts should this occur.

Significant efforts are put into readiness planning for these threats. This essentially involves working with others in our industry, Biosecurity New Zealand and affected sectors to agree how we would respond to an incursion of these organisms and running simulations with KiwiNet (our industry response team) to test these readiness plans.

The Most Unwanted list has just been updated and many of the pests and pathogens that feature will look familiar as you would have seen them in the headlines in recent times – BMSB was found in December at a property in Mount Maunganui and there have been three separate fruit fly responses in Auckland this year.

However, there have also been some changes to the list, namely the addition of the Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) which is becoming an increasing threat globally since its invasion into the USA in 2014. Kiwifruit is a host to this pest and there have been reports of damage to kiwifruit in both its native and invasive range with sooty mould growth being the most significant impact. SLF is a hitchhiker pest that would be most likely to arrive as egg masses on inanimate objects. Researchers in the USA say this pest may be just as devastating if not worse than BMSB.

You can order a copy of the Kiwifruit's Most Unwanted updated foldout flyer or brand new poster (we have them in A4 and A3) for your orchard, business, or staffroom by contacting KVH.

Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Psa symptoms herald spring season change
22 August 2019
KVH has to date received two reports of Psa exudate symptoms, one for a previously undetected orchard and the other for a young Gold3 block. Early varieties are now beginning to break bud and...
Psa symptoms herald spring season change
22 August 2019

KVH has to date received two reports of Psa exudate symptoms, one for a previously undetected orchard and the other for a young Gold3 block. Early varieties are now beginning to break bud and growers are recommended to begin monitoring areas more prone to Psa, to build an understanding of where risk may lie this season. Focus on more vulnerable young plants and take care to protect these with directed spray programmes and good frost protection.

If ground conditions have limited the opportunity to apply sprays through winter, now is the time to apply copper at winter rates, ensuring a one-week window is maintained between bud enhancing spays and copper. Research has shown Psa can be present under bud scales as well as on the surface of buds so protection through the bud-break period is key to providing a strong start to the spring programme.

Where pruning gangs are still at work an emphasis on tool hygiene is also recommended.

If Psa-like symptoms are seen for the first time on your orchard report these to KVH on 0800 665 825. Growers can also contact their packhouse technical representative for advice and sample collection if required.

Hill Laboratories carry out routine Psa testing weekly on Wednesdays.

Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Distant experts fight bug threat
22 August 2019
Two scientists on opposite sides of the world are at the forefront of the battle to keep some of the most insidious, damaging pests at bay from valuable food crops. This summer in northern Italy they...
Distant experts fight bug threat
22 August 2019

Two scientists on opposite sides of the world are at the forefront of the battle to keep some of the most insidious, damaging pests at bay from valuable food crops. This summer in northern Italy they are working closely in an effort to try to stymie the spread of the voracious Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) there and keep it out of New Zealand entirely.

Professors Claudio Ioriatti of Foundazione Edmund Mach and Max Suckling of New Zealand’s Plant and Food Research and University of Auckland spoke to
Farmers Weekly last week about their battle with bugs across the hemispheres:

Standing in an orchard in the warm north Italian sunshine Professor Max Suckling casts a rueful eye towards the mountains surrounding the Trento district.

“I am sure those hills are crawling with them,” he observes, referring to the BMSB flitting and crawling across the ripening apples next to him.

The stink bug has already almost wiped out Italy’s €300 million pear industry and now threatens Trento’s 10,000 hectares of apple crops. Its impact in NZ would devastate the horticultural sector and significantly increase the amount of sprays used on remaining fruit, losing NZ fruit’s premium as a low-residue fruit supplier.


Read more here.

Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Virginian apple grower experience of BMSB
22 August 2019
Last week KVH travelled to the Hawkes Bay to join a workshop hosted by New Zealand Apples & Pears which focused on mid to long-term management of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). Bill...
Virginian apple grower experience of BMSB
22 August 2019

Last week KVH travelled to the Hawkes Bay to join a workshop hosted by New Zealand Apples & Pears which focused on mid to long-term management of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

Bill Mackintosh, who was also a speaker at the Apples & Pears annual conference this year, set the scene sharing first-hand experience of the damage, control and secondary pest problems associated with BMSB in his home region of West Virginia.

Bill grows apples, pears and peaches and commented that trapping and control methods are continually improving, with growers benefiting from United States Department of Agriculture research into control methods.

Most growers now reduce damage through application of border sprays four to five times a year, although in years where BMSB levels are high, growers may still repeatedly spray whole orchards. Residue profiles for fruit sprayed to protect against BMSB are a real challenge as treated fruit loses access to premium markets (which demand residue free fruit). The rise in pests previously controlled through well-developed integrated fruit production programmes has also impacted grower returns and viability. Populations of western flower thrips, woolly aphids and St Jose scale, have all bounced back since pyrethroids have been applied.

Bill emphasised the importance of early detection and prompted all growers and field staff to be on constant watch for all life stages of BMSB, and to pay close attention to any unusual crop damage. He recalls poor storage quality was reported for local apple crops in the years leading up to the 2010 BMSB population explosion, and in hindsight believes that internal damage, diagnosed then as calcium deficiency, may well have been early sightings of BMSB damage. Small droplets on the skin of developing fruit, with no apparent cause were also a clue sometimes picked up by the keen eye.

Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Phytophthora planning underway
22 August 2019
Last week a one-day symposium on Phytophthora was held in Auckland as part of the New Zealand Plant Protection Society (NZPPS) Conference. Phytophthora has had a lot of attention recently as it...
Phytophthora planning underway
22 August 2019

Last week a one-day symposium on Phytophthora was held in Auckland as part of the New Zealand Plant Protection Society (NZPPS) Conference.

Phytophthora has had a lot of attention recently as it continues to spread globally and cause devastation to a range of cultivated and natural environments. Notable species in New Zealand include Phytophthora agathidicida which causes Kauri Dieback, P. pluvialis which is causing Red Needle Cast in pine, and P. cinnamomi which is causing problems for Avocados.

The symposium drew on a broad range of speakers, both locally and internationally, bringing a unique global perspective. Matt Dyck from KVH and Dr. Sonia Whiteman from Zespri presented on the risk of Invasive Phytophthora to kiwifruit.  They covered the recent literature review commissioned to better understand that risk, as well as the importance of learning more about which species could potentially impact us here in New Zealand. They also noted the preparation underway through our readiness and response plan which is currently being developed in conjunction with Biosecurity New Zealand.

Biosecurity News
8 August 2019
BMSB warning to importers
8 August 2019
Biosecurity New Zealand has sent a stark message to shippers, agents, and importers that imported cargo must meet new rules intended to keep Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) out of New...
BMSB warning to importers
8 August 2019

Biosecurity New Zealand has sent a stark message to shippers, agents, and importers that imported cargo must meet new rules intended to keep Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) out of New Zealand.

The importing industry needs to be aware that high-risk cargo that hasn't been treated before arrival will not be allowed to come ashore in most instances. The aim is to keep out the highly invasive pest that could devastate New Zealand's horticulture industry if it established here. 

The new rules were formally issued by Biosecurity New Zealand in late July. They require offshore treatment of imported vehicles, machinery, and parts from 33 identified risk countries, and all sea containers from Italy during the stink bug season. In the past, only uncontainerised vehicle cargo from risk countries required treatment before arriving in New Zealand.

Similar to previous years, this season will see increased surveillance and inspection of arriving vessels and cargo from countries with established stink bug populations.

Find out more about the new rules here.

Biosecurity News
8 August 2019
Kiwifruit represented in Biosecurity Act overhaul
8 August 2019
Workshops involving key stakeholders are currently underway across the country for the review of the Biosecurity Act, which was announced by the Minister for Biosecurity last month.   Our...
Kiwifruit represented in Biosecurity Act overhaul
8 August 2019

Workshops involving key stakeholders are currently underway across the country for the review of the Biosecurity Act, which was announced by the Minister for Biosecurity last month.  

Our biosecurity system is underpinned by the Biosecurity Act, which provides the legal framework for Biosecurity New Zealand and other organisations to help keep harmful organisms out of the country. It also provides the framework for how we respond, and manage organisms, if any make it into the country.

KVH attended the Tauranga workshop on behalf of the kiwifruit industry last week, to begin working through a number of key topics including the purpose and principles of the Act, pest management, the import health system, funding and Government Industry Agreements (GIA), compensation, and on-farm/orchard biosecurity practices. From here, Biosecurity New Zealand - who are running the workshops and overhaul process – will use information collected at the workshops as part of an initial review of aspects of the Act that need to be addressed quickly, particularly around funding for biosecurity responses, and how decision-making works between government and industry partners. There will be a public consultation process for this initial stage later this year.

There will also be a second, more extensive and longer wave of work looking at issues that impact New Zealand’s environmental, social and cultural outcomes. Public consultation for this will occur in the second half of 2020.

KVH will continue to be involved in the process over time, ensuring kiwifruit growers influence the development of a new Act. Everyone will have a chance to have a say – we’ll provide updates once formal public consultation begins. You can read more about the overhaul and the Minister’s announcement
here.

Biosecurity News
8 August 2019
New Whangarei Psa-positive orchard
8 August 2019
A further Psa result has been confirmed on a Whangarei orchard this week bringing the total positives in this region to six. Red exudate was observed on one G3 trunk girdle on an orchard which is in...
New Whangarei Psa-positive orchard
8 August 2019

A further Psa result has been confirmed on a Whangarei orchard this week bringing the total positives in this region to six.

Red exudate was observed on one G3 trunk girdle on an orchard which is in close proximity to other positive orchards in the region.

Growers in this and other regions with Not Detected orchards should be monitoring regularly to identify any symptoms. Look for cane dieback and check carefully around any wounds (i.e. grafts, girdles). Young plants are generally more at risk, as are stressed vines or those in cold, damp areas.

There have been a number of high-risk weather events recently and we are coming up to the spring infection period, so it is important to maintain a good protectant spray programme and good hygiene practices.

Biosecurity News
8 August 2019
Biosecurity a top priority for Farmlands
8 August 2019
Last week Farmlands Horticulture provided an opportunity for KVH to present an extended biosecurity update their annual subtropical crops technical update in Mount Maunganui. This reflected their...
Biosecurity a top priority for Farmlands
8 August 2019

Last week Farmlands Horticulture provided an opportunity for KVH to present an extended biosecurity update their annual subtropical crops technical update in Mount Maunganui. This reflected their acknowledgement of biosecurity as a key risk to their shareholder businesses.

KVH Director Simon Cook presented on his Nuffield scholarship travels, sharing insights on the impact of citrus greening in Florida, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) incursion in Chile and the challenging TR4 Banana Panama disease in Queensland. Simon strongly promoted the message of farm gate biosecurity as a key part of protecting horticultural investments.

Erin Lane, KVH’s Biosecurity Analyst provided updates on BMSB at the border, the ongoing fruit fly response and the industry’s “most unwanted” threat list. Discussion of industry readiness plans for Phytophthora illustrated how biosecurity threats can be vectored by people, machinery and soil, and a year in review session reflected on industry and grower reported pests and vine symptoms, some of which have led to new research projects.

The value of a collective approach to produce results was a key take-home message.  KVH acknowledged the on-the-ground expertise of the Farmlands team and the ongoing support provided to growers and industry through their efforts towards lifting awareness around biosecurity on a day-to-day basis. 

Biosecurity News
8 August 2019
In the news
8 August 2019
Depressingly impressive BMSB infestation: Max Suckling tweeted a video of BMSB on the Fondazione Edmund Mach apple research mower in Trentino, Italy, reminding us of the infestation levels this bug...
In the news
8 August 2019

Depressingly impressive BMSB infestation: Max Suckling tweeted a video of BMSB on the Fondazione Edmund Mach apple research mower in Trentino, Italy, reminding us of the infestation levels this bug can reach and why we don’t want it here.

Fijian passenger denied entry: A traveller from Fiji was refused entry into New Zealand after attempting to smuggle in seeds and other fresh plant material. Biosecurity New Zealand officers found four different seed types and fresh chillies in the traveller’s baggage.

Biosecurity News
8 August 2019
KPCS nurseries come together
8 August 2019
More than 30 nurseries were represented alongside KVH earlier this week at a forum to strengthen communication and partnership with nurseries who are part of the Kiwifruit Plant Certification...
KPCS nurseries come together
8 August 2019

More than 30 nurseries were represented alongside KVH earlier this week at a forum to strengthen communication and partnership with nurseries who are part of the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS).

There were several informative presentations during the event, as well as discussions and feedback opportunities.

Growers should have confidence that kiwifruit nurseries are effectively and efficiently managing the biosecurity risks associated with kiwifruit rootstock movement through their compliance with the KPCS. Other industries also have similar schemes in place, with their growers recognising the value of certified plants.

Sourcing and tracing clean plant material – the fundamentals of the KPCS – are also one of the steps in the new Kiwifruit Growers Biosecurity Guidelines. Growers can reduce risk associated with plant material by following movement controls, inspecting all material when it arrives on the orchard, and keeping records that are up-to-date. A template and check sheet are included in the guidelines booklet (Step 3).

Biosecurity News
8 August 2019
Stink bug threatens Italian kiwifruit
8 August 2019
Fruit crops including pears, apples and kiwifruit in some of Italy's major producing regions are reportedly under grave threat following an unusually widespread outbreak of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug...
Stink bug threatens Italian kiwifruit
8 August 2019

Fruit crops including pears, apples and kiwifruit in some of Italy's major producing regions are reportedly under grave threat following an unusually widespread outbreak of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

The insect is said to be worryingly prevalent this year across much of northern Italy, including Piedmont Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, Veneto, Trentino-South Tyrol and Friuli-Venezia Giulia.

According to reports, the outbreak is so serious that some believe it threatens to wipe out Italy's entire pear crop, with estimated potential damage to that sector alone ranging from €250m to in excess of €400m (around $430m - $685m NZD) and the government has been called on to set up an emergency committee to tackle the problem, which has been further aggravated by an unseasonable climate.

A local agricultural body has confirmed the bug has been detected in Italy's so-called golden quadrilateral, an area linking Ferrara, Modena, Bologna and Ravenna that is responsible for producing almost three-quarters of the country's pear crop. The group's regional president said, “the reality is beyond our imagination and even more negative than any ominous initial forecast".

KVH Chief Executive Stu Hutchings will be in Italy in a few weeks attending the annual IKO (International Kiwifruit Organization) convention to discuss biosecurity and plant health with global producers, including Italian counterparts. He will also take the opportunity to visit research providers in USA to see field application of control work for both BMSB and Spotted Lanternfly. Post-convention he will visit some Italian orchards and nurseries to assess biosecurity issues that they face in their kiwifruit production.

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Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz