Search Site

Newsroom

Print these articles
Media Releases
12 August 2019
Auckland fruit fly detections
12 August 2019
Auckland fruit fly response to step-up again As we are nearing the end of winter, the fruit fly response in the Northcote area is about to step-up again, with the focus on maintaining controls...
Auckland fruit fly detections
12 August 2019

Auckland fruit fly response to step-up again

As we are nearing the end of winter, the fruit fly response in the Northcote area is about to step-up again, with the focus on maintaining controls and resuming baiting and more intensive trapping.

Since 26 April, an area of Northcote has been under a Controlled Area Notice, restricting the movement of certain fruit and vegetables out of controlled areas to help prevent the spread of any fruit flies that may still be in the vicinity. Along with the continued movement restrictions, a network of fruit fly surveillance traps which attract male fruit flies have remained in the area over winter and were regularly checked, with the last single male fruit fly detected in the current controlled area on 15 July.

We signalled at the start of winter that we would be stepping up again about now to ensure this significant pest does not establish in New Zealand. We won’t be relaxing our efforts until we are absolutely confident we are rid of these flies. We have found 10 flies in the Northcote area since February, and while we still haven’t found any evidence of larvae, pupae, eggs or female flies, the continued finds indicate that flies could remain in the area, albeit at very low levels.

People in Northcote will be given advanced notice if bait is to be placed in their property, and they will be provided with detailed information about the bait and what’s happening.

Detailed maps of the controlled areas, a full description of the boundaries, and full information about the rules are available on the
Biosecurity New Zealand website.

Media Releases
7 May 2019
Stinky pest thwarted
7 May 2019
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one of the biggest risks facing New Zealand’s horticultural sector and outdoor way of life, says a group of horticulture-wide organisations who have...
Stinky pest thwarted
7 May 2019

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one of the biggest risks facing New Zealand’s horticultural sector and outdoor way of life, says a group of horticulture-wide organisations who have come together to help stop the damaging hitch-hiker making a home here.

Dr Ed Massey, Biosecurity and Emergency Response Manager for New Zealand Winegrowers and Chair of the BMSB Council says overseas this stinky pest has caused catastrophic damage in some areas where it has established.

“Although BMSB has managed to reach our shores in the past, it hasn’t found a foothold here. This is largely due to the increased awareness people across the country have to be on the lookout and report the unusual bug, combined with increased risk management measures and the vigilance of Biosecurity New Zealand’s border staff at the frontline.”

Backing this up are the increasingly combined efforts of Government and industry organisations who have come together to jointly prepare for and respond to the potential impacts of BMSB, says Ed.

In 2017 the BMSB Council was founded through the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for biosecurity readiness and response. The Council is responsible for ensuring New Zealand is collectively prepared to mitigate the risks posed by this pest.

“The stink bug could cause hundreds of millions of dollars of losses for our horticulture industry, as well as seriously damaging quality of life for all New Zealanders. There is heightened awareness of biosecurity risk across the country and our industry is more aware than ever that we cannot afford to ever be complacent."

“The most recent high-risk season for BMSB started in September 2018 and finished at the end of April. There have been more than 200 live BMSB found over that time and importantly, we’ve prevented them from establishing.”

“The finds have included a batch of live bugs that were discovered in a box of shoes bought online from overseas, finds onboard ships coming to our shores, and single bugs that were reported by residents in Mt Maunganui and Glenfield, Auckland.”

Ed adds that over the last year the BMSB Council has made significant progress towards mitigating the potential impact of a BMSB incursion.

“In August last year the Council successfully applied to the Environmental Protection Authority to release – with strict controls - a BMSB biocontrol in the event of an incursion. This was a major milestone and provides us with another weapon in our fight against the stink bug. We’re currently planning how we might use the wasp to ensure any future release is as effective as possible.”

“We’ve also had BMSB Council representatives recently in Tbilisi, Georgia – a country facing a disastrous BMSB outbreak - to learn more about potential management options.” 

In addition, the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has recently proposed amendments to relevant import regulations to further mitigate the risk of BMSB entering New Zealand from high-risk countries.

“The BMSB Council backs these moves to strengthen New Zealand’s biosecurity and ensure we are doing everything possible to continue to keep the pest at bay. There is always more we can learn but we are on the right track and confident that this year’s activities have improved our collective readiness for BMSB.”  

The strongest weapon in the nation’s fight against BMSB remains public awareness says Ed.

“In many countries, the winter months when the insects move inside homes to keep warm have been the time of year when new populations have been detected.  It can infest homes in the thousands and is almost impossible to get rid of.”

“Unlike fruit fly or other well-known pests that are associated with specific commodities, BMSB can be found on a wide range of imported goods and in travellers’ luggage as they arrive in New Zealand. The majority have been found on ships, mail packages and personal effects coming into the country.”

“This is why help from the public is so important and makes all the difference. We ask everyone to keep an eye out for this pest because it’s feasible that it might turn up in an overseas present or package, in the pocket of a jacket in a suitcase, or even any number of surprising places - BMSB is a seriously clever hitch-hiker.

If you think you have seen BMSB inside your home catch it; snap it; report it. Call the Biosecurity New Zealand hotline 0800 80 99 66 to report your find.

How to identify BMSB

There are currently other species of stink bugs found in New Zealand that could be confused with BMSB. Key distinguishing features of the adult BMSB are:

- It is about the size of a 10c coin and 14-17mm long.

- Look for black and white banding on the antennae and alternate black and white markings on the abdomen

Image: BMSB on the side of a building in Italy in autumn 2017. Credit: Udine Today.

 

Media Releases
6 March 2019
Confidence in system after fruit fly detections
6 March 2019
New Zealand fruit and vegetable growers should continue to have confidence in the ongoing investigations into Auckland fruit fly detections, says the horticulture-wide group set up to jointly prepare...
Confidence in system after fruit fly detections
6 March 2019

New Zealand fruit and vegetable growers should continue to have confidence in the ongoing investigations into Auckland fruit fly detections, says the horticulture-wide group set up to jointly prepare for and respond to the potential impacts of fruit fly.

Stu Hutchings, Chair of the Fruit Fly Council - a governance group made up of impacted industry sector representatives and MPI under the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) partnership - says the responses set up in Otara, Devonport, and Northcote are running well and are following the pre-agreed operational plans established and tested in previous responses. Council members are also involved the decision-making process ensuring the interests of New Zealand’s primary producers are represented fully.

“These fruit fly finds are of great concern for our industries and that’s why we’re part of the governance group leading the investigations, ensuring the most appropriate action is taken to minimise any impact on growers and our wider industry.”

“It’s been a priority since the day of the very first find for us all to work together in the best interests of our growers and do everything we can to determine whether there are more flies in the area, and if so, stop them from spreading any further.”

“To date, despite the additional finds, there is no evidence of a breeding population and that is good news that can give us continued confidence in our biosecurity system, as well as the response actions taken so far.”

“More than 10,000 kilos of fruit has been collected in the bins placed in the three affected response regions and disposed of.  Additionally, a significant amount of fruit - around 800 kilos - has been gathered from properties within the A zones for each of the three responses and examined for larvae, without any findings.”

“All the flies have been found in traps, which are very sensitive and an internationally proven method of surveillance. If there is a breeding population present, there is a high likelihood of finding it as the response continues over the coming days.”

Stu adds that although the trapping results reflect well on New Zealand’s surveillance system, the Fruit Fly Council backs MPIs recently announced independent review of the air passenger, cruise and mail pathways.

“We fully support the review underway because although there will always be some risk of unwanted pests and diseases getting here, it’s absolutely imperative we do everything we can to try and stop them. If there are any holes in the system currently, they need to be found and immediately fixed.”

“All the members of the Fruit Fly Council will advocate for their growers in the review and make sure that any learnings that come from it are taken into account so that we can be certain going into the future that we have a robust biosecurity system.”

Background:

If they established here, fruit flies could have serious consequences for New Zealand’s horticultural industry. Biosecurity New Zealand is working closely with international trading partners and industry groups to ensure any potential risk is managed.

The most likely way that fruit flies can arrive in New Zealand is in fresh fruit and vegetables. Be vigilant and keep watch. While it may be possible to find on fruit trees if present, a better option is to look out for any larvae in fruit, including tree fallen fruit. Report anything of concern to the pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66.

The Fruit Fly Council came together under GIA in May 2016 and comprises New Zealand Apples and Pears, Kiwifruit Vine Health, New Zealand Avocado Growers Association, Citrus New Zealand, MPI, Summerfruit New Zealand, Vegetables New Zealand, Horticulture NZ and Tomatoes New Zealand. Read more here.

 

Media Releases
13 November 2018
KVH wins biosecurity award
13 November 2018
Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) has won a national biosecurity award for its contribution to the biosecurity integrity of the New Zealand kiwifruit industry. KVH accepted the Industry Award at the 2018...
KVH wins biosecurity award
13 November 2018

Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) has won a national biosecurity award for its contribution to the biosecurity integrity of the New Zealand kiwifruit industry.

KVH accepted the Industry Award at the 2018 New Zealand Biosecurity Awards in Auckland last night.

The Ministry for Primary Industries said the award recognised KVH’s contribution to the recovery of the kiwifruit industry following the devastating discovery of Psa in 2010, and its subsequent responsibility for managing all biosecurity readiness, response and operations for the industry.

KVH chairman Dr Dave Tanner said the win recognised KVH’s pivotal role in managing the initial outbreak of the disease and developing robust biosecurity processes and resources to boost the industry’s biosecurity integrity.

“KVH was formed in 2010 as the New Zealand kiwifruit industry reeled from the discovery of Psa,” Dr Tanner said.

“The small team was tasked with working alongside industry and Government to help growers contain and manage Psa. KVH did a great job and was subsequently tasked with responsibility for addressing all possible pests and incursions. The KVH team is hugely dedicated to its role in helping protect the livelihoods of New Zealand kiwifruit growers through monitoring, education, technology, and partnerships with Government and biosecurity agencies.”

KVH chief executive Stu Hutchings said the award celebrated the partnership approach which had ensured the industry was better placed for any future biosecurity event.

“There is no doubt that by working in partnership, we can achieve better biosecurity outcomes. KVH was the first organisation in New Zealand to sign up to a new collaborative arrangement called Government Industry Agreements; an arrangement which enabled Government and industry to share decision-making, responsibilities and costs for incursions.

“We have also embraced a collaborative approach in partnering in the Port of Tauranga Biosecurity Excellence initiative for many years and are founding members of the exciting new Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital programme,” Mr Hutchings said.

Mr Hutchings said recovery from Psa was an achievement of which the entire kiwifruit industry could be proud. KVH and New Zealand growers were passionate supporters of the national strategy of creating a biosecurity team of 4.7 million people.

“We’ve worked hard in the biosecurity space to ensure a resilient and united voice for the kiwifruit industry, and it’s great that our efforts - and those of the people who have worked with us over the years - have been recognised with this award.”  

For additional comment: Stu Hutchings, KVH CE, 0800 665 825 

Media Releases
28 September 2018
Tauranga Moana welcomes biosecurity campaign
28 September 2018
A newly formed Tauranga-based biosecurity group today welcomed a campaign that aims to protect New Zealand from invasive pests and diseases. The national Ko Tātou This Is Us campaign, unveiled...
Tauranga Moana welcomes biosecurity campaign
28 September 2018

A newly formed Tauranga-based biosecurity group today welcomed a campaign that aims to protect New Zealand from invasive pests and diseases.

The national Ko Tātou This Is Us campaign, unveiled last night, focusses on the personal and cultural impacts of a biosecurity breach and asks all New Zealanders to help create ‘a biosecurity team of 4.7 million’.

Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) is already working locally to counter biosecurity threats through community collaboration. The new initiative brings together community groups, iwi, industry and business, councils, central government, science and education representatives for the first time, to lead and take action towards biosecurity excellence.

“We are right behind the new national campaign, which is going to help us show people that we have so much to lose and it is essential that we work together to protect what is precious to us,” says TMBC co-chair Carlton Bidois.

He says keeping invasive unwanted organisms at bay matters to anyone who enjoys harvesting kaimoana from the sea or interacting with the region’s iconic mountains and native forests.

“It also affects everyone earning a living and operating a business in the Bay of Plenty, where our economy is dependent on the natural environment.

“A single organism like the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug or a fruit fly could bankrupt the horticultural sector and its families overnight. Kauri dieback and myrtle rust could see the potential annhialation of our iconic kauri and other indigenous tree species, severing the inherent cultural genealogy and traditions Maori have with the natural world.”

Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor will launch the new TMBC initiative at a biosecurity excellence symposium in Tauranga on Tuesday 16 October. The group is also co-ordinating a week-long series of related events around the region.

Mr Bidois says TMBC is already attracting interest from other communities, in the Waikato and Taranaki.

“There is nothing like it anywhere else in New Zealand and we think we can really lead the way here in Tauranga Moana.”

For more information, please contact Carlton Bidois on 022 091 0557 or co-chair Graeme Marshall on 027 444 6201, visit the TMBC website, or Ko Tātou This Is Us.

About TMBC:

TMBC members are committed to working together to achieve biosecurity excellence. We are joining forces to:

✓ Grow biosecurity awareness and social license, including running joint campaigns

✓ Build visibility of great things happening and promoting initiatives/events

✓ Advocate for better biosecurity for our region

✓ Catalyse action – people getting involved

✓ Collaborate to achieve better results, sharing information and lessons

✓ Seize opportunities that will grow the regional team committed to biosecurity excellence ‘Ko Tātou’ – This is us. This is our Tauranga moana so let’s protect it together.

Media Releases
22 August 2018
Horticulture welcomes major biocontrol milestone
22 August 2018
The New Zealand horticulture industry has welcomed the Environmental Protection Authority’s (EPA) decision allowing the release of a tiny Samurai Wasp into New Zealand, if ever there was an...
Horticulture welcomes major biocontrol milestone
22 August 2018

The New Zealand horticulture industry has welcomed the Environmental Protection Authority’s (EPA) decision allowing the release of a tiny Samurai Wasp into New Zealand, if ever there was an incursion of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

BMSB Council Chair Alan Pollard applauded the outcome as a major milestone against one of the greatest threats to New Zealand’s horticultural industry and urban communities.

“The industry greatly appreciates the positive decision and acknowledges the consideration given by the EPA to the significant number of submissions made on the application."

”Today we’ve achieved a significant step towards preparing for a major biosecurity risk, which is getting greater by the day, with increasing trade and tourism crossing our borders,” he said.

The Samurai Wasp is the size of a poppy seed and completely harmless to humans and animals except stink bugs. It is a natural enemy of BMSB; the female wasp lays her eggs inside those of the stink bug, killing the nymph in the process. Studies overseas have shown that the wasp can destroy over 70 percent of the eggs in a stink bug egg mass.

“The stink bug could cause hundreds of millions of dollars of losses for our industry, as well as seriously damaging quality of life for all New Zealanders."

“With the heightened awareness of biosecurity risk across New Zealand, our industry is more aware than ever that we cannot afford to be, and never will be, complacent."

“Approving the release of Samurai as a biocontrol is an excellent step but there is more work to do before the wasp is ready to be used as a tool. It’s not the silver bullet and a stink bug incursion would require a multi-faceted approach."

“We’ve seen overseas growers rely on high levels of insecticide as the primary control for BMSB and, while this wasp provides the opportunity to reduce our dependence on chemicals, a full response will require every weapon in our armoury.”

Mr Pollard said the decision was made possible through the collaboration of horticultural industry groups and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), working together under the Government Industry Agreement for readiness and response (GIA). He also acknowledged the science community for its impartial research that resulted in the Council using crucial information to support the application.

Permission to release the wasp will be subject to a number of strict controls that will dictate when, where, and by whom it can be released.

An NZIER report, commissioned by the Samurai Wasp Steering Group, has estimated that gross domestic product would fall by between $1.8 billion and $3.6b by 2038 if BMSB became established. It also estimated the horticulture export value could fall by between $2b and $4.2b.

About the BMSB Council
The BMSB Council is a partnership under GIA between industry and government and is responsible for BMSB readiness and response. The Council consists of member organisations (Horticulture New Zealand, Kiwifruit Vine Health, Ministry for Primary Industries, New Zealand Avocado, New Zealand Apples & Pears, New Zealand Winegrowers, Summerfruit New Zealand, Tomatoes New Zealand, Vegetables New Zealand) and observers (Foundation for Arable Research and New Zealand Plant Producers Inc).

About the Government Industry Agreement (GIA)
GIA operates as a partnership between industry groups and Government to manage pests and diseases that could badly damage New Zealand's primary industries, our economy, and our environment. Under GIA, Signatories share the decision-making responsibilities and costs of preparing for – and responding to – biosecurity incursions. It aims to improve biosecurity outcomes and give everyone the confidence that the best decisions are being made to manage and mitigate biosecurity risks. For more information, visit www.gia.org.nz.

Media Releases
2 August 2018
Third Flagship Site for BioHeritage
2 August 2018
New Zealand's Biological Heritage has joined the award-winning Port of Tauranga biosecurity partnership that is committed to biosecurity excellence. It is the third Flagship Site for the BioHeritage...
Third Flagship Site for BioHeritage
2 August 2018

New Zealand's Biological Heritage has joined the award-winning Port of Tauranga biosecurity partnership that is committed to biosecurity excellence.

It is the third Flagship Site for the BioHeritage Challenge, with this collaboration being aligned with our goal of eliminating threats posed by pests, weeds, and pathogens.

Flagship Site partnerships provide a pathway to the Challenge’s goal of achieving a fundamental shift in the way science and research is carried out in New Zealand, BioHeritage Director Dr Andrea Byrom says.

“In particular, we believe that transformational change can only be achieved through partnerships with industry, the private sector, Māori and the community.”

The Challenge’s involvement supports research on surveillance and detection of pests at the border being done by the Better Border Biosecurity (B3) science consortium. It bolsters the Port of Tauranga’s commitment to use science to support innovation and grow biosecurity excellence. B3’s goals are strongly aligned with the BioHeritage Challenge, with them sharing a vision to deliver transformational biosecurity solutions for New Zealand.

The Port of Tauranga biosecurity partnership was formed in 2014 between the port, several primary industries, and central and local government agencies. All groups work together to prevent and respond to biosecurity risks through the Port of Tauranga.

Port of Tauranga Chief Executive Mark Cairns said the partnership strengthens the significance of biosecurity within the port and local community.

“New Zealand ports are an essential part of the New Zealand economy and a key component of our border biosecurity system. Effective biosecurity awareness and the use of the very best tools and technologies is critical to us continuing to run a successful business that services the Bay of Plenty region.”

Stu Hutchings, Chief Executive of industry partner Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH), says the partnership recognises that everyone who works in and around the port community, including the freight sector and transitional facilities, can all play a big part in keeping unwanted pests and pathogens out of New Zealand.

The other two Flagship Sites supported by BioHeritage are Cape to City in the Hawke’s Bay and Taranaki Mounga.

“Being involved with Flagship Sites provides opportunities to broaden and deepen the range of activities being undertaken, and helps us connect with the public,” Andrea says.

“Our involvement also recognises the strategic role that science and research must play in shaping New Zealand’s future.”

Media Releases
29 June 2018
Kiwifruit Claim outcome
29 June 2018
The High Court has announced a ruling today in the Kiwifruit Claim case. Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) is focused on the future and working in partnership with government and other groups to...
Kiwifruit Claim outcome
29 June 2018

The High Court has announced a ruling today in the Kiwifruit Claim case.

Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) is focused on the future and working in partnership with government and other groups to improve the biosecurity of the industry.

KVH Chief Executive Stu Hutchings says the organisation does not have a position on the Claim but is supportive of the rights of growers and their entitlement to have taken this legal action.

“The judge has made a ruling and it is now up to the parties involved to determine what their next steps might be.”

“KVH works with everyone involved in the kiwifruit industry. Our priority will be to continue to work collaboratively with the 2,500 kiwifruit growers across the regions to keep unwanted pests and diseases out of our orchards.”

Media contact:
Lisa Gibbison
Communications Advisor
0800 665 825
02202 54724

Media Releases
30 April 2018
Response to article about wild kiwifruit vines
30 April 2018
KVH has provided the below response to the Marlborough Express in regards to an article on wild kiwifruit vines. Dear Editor, Over the weekend Stuff.co.nz and the Sunday Star Times published an...
Response to article about wild kiwifruit vines
30 April 2018

KVH has provided the below response to the Marlborough Express in regards to an article on wild kiwifruit vines.

Dear Editor,

Over the weekend Stuff.co.nz and the Sunday Star Times published an article from one of your reporters on wild kiwifruit vines.

The article included valuable information about the topic that is important for the public to be aware of, however from our perspective there was an unnecessarily alarmist tone to the article overall. KVH, several regional councils and unitary authorities all work together on initiatives to manage wild kiwifruit vines and have done so, very successfully, for many years as part of our usual business.

There were some inaccuracies that need correcting:

·        KVH said that it’s not very often an industry comes along and asks that the plant on which that industry is based is named as a pest. We did not ask that the produce/kiwifruit be named as a pest.

·        Contractors destroyed 14,600 wild vines in 2017 and not since 2010.

·        Wild kiwifruit vines have historically established from dumped fruit and the discovery of fruit stickers has proved this.  Dumped fruit is not “scraps” and we said wild vines can also establish from unconsumed fruit left in a compost heap.

KVH is always happy to review facts used by your reporters in the interest of ensuring correct information about what is a complex and technical programme of work, can be provided to readers.

Lastly, we would also like to clarify that KVH is not a lobby group. We are the kiwifruit industry’s biosecurity organisation, funded by growers, and we work collaboratively with all parties across the industry as well as government.

Kind regards,

Stu Hutchings
Chief Executive
KVH

Media Releases
11 April 2018
Tiny wasp to combat stink bug
11 April 2018
Horticultural industry groups along with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) are working together to use a tiny parasitoid wasp to combat the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). The...
Tiny wasp to combat stink bug
11 April 2018

Horticultural industry groups along with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) are working together to use a tiny parasitoid wasp to combat the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

The BMSB Council (a partnership between horticultural industry groups and MPI, under GIA) has made an application to the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) seeking approval to release the Samurai Wasp (Trissolcus japonicus) as a biocontrol agent against BMSB, but only if an incursion is found in New Zealand.

BMSB Council Chair Alan Pollard says if a BMSB incursion is found here, the consequences would be disastrous for New Zealand's horticulture industries and everyday New Zealanders.  

“The stink bug is one of the biggest biosecurity threats we face, and it could cause hundreds of millions of dollars of losses. The wasp provides an opportunity to be proactive in our approach and gives us another tool we can use to control the stink bug,” said Mr Pollard.

“It feeds on over 300 plant species and can multiply and get to very high population numbers rapidly, destroying crops and gardens and even get into your home. In the USA and Europe where the invasive pest has become established, it has caused severe damage to the horticulture industries. It’s also invaded residents’ homes and become a real social nuisance.”

“We’ve also seen growers overseas use high levels of insecticides as the primary way to control the stink bug. We believe the wasp will provide a targeted and self-sustaining control tool and provides growers with another option other than increasing insecticide sprays,” says Mr Pollard.

The wasp does not sting and is harmless to humans but is a natural enemy of the stink bug. The female wasp lays her eggs inside the stink bugs eggs, killing the stink bug in the process. Studies overseas have shown the wasp can destroy over 70 percent of the eggs in a stink bug egg mass.

A NZIER report, commissioned by the Samurai Wasp Steering Group, has estimated that gross domestic product would fall by between $1.8 billion and $3.6b by 2038 if BMSB became established. It also estimated the horticulture export value could fall by between $2b and $4.2b.

Public submissions are now open until 5pm, Thursday, 24 May 2018. Interested parties are encouraged to make a submission on the EPA website.


For more information contact:

Alan Pollard
GIA BMSB Council Chair
Ph: 021 576 109
Email: alan@applesandpears.nz

About the BMSB Council

The BMSB Council is a partnership under GIA between industry and government and is the responsible for BMSB readiness and response. The Council consists of member organisations (Kiwifruit Vine Health, Ministry for Primary Industries, New Zealand Avocado, New Zealand Apples & Pears, New Zealand Winegrowers, Tomatoes New Zealand, Vegetables New Zealand) and observers (Foundation for Arable Research, Horticulture New Zealand, New Zealand Plant Producers Inc., Process Vegetables New Zealand and Summerfruit New Zealand).


About the Government Industry Agreement (GIA)

GIA operates as a partnership between industry groups and Government to manage pests and diseases that could badly damage New Zealand's primary industries, our economy, and our environment. It aims to improve biosecurity outcomes and give everyone the confidence that the best decisions are being made to manage and mitigate biosecurity risks. For more information, visit www.gia.org.nz.

 

Media Releases
27 February 2018
BMSB impact on horticulture devastating, report says
27 February 2018
An economic report, released today, says if the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) establishes in New Zealand it would dramatically impact New Zealand’s gross domestic product (GDP) as well as...
BMSB impact on horticulture devastating, report says
27 February 2018

An economic report, released today, says if the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) establishes in New Zealand it would dramatically impact New Zealand’s gross domestic product (GDP) as well as export revenues from horticulture.

Prepared by the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research (NZIER), Quantifying the economic impacts of a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug incursion in New Zealand, shows GDP falling between $1.8 billion and $3.6 billion by 2038, and horticulture export value falling between $2 billion and $4.2 billion by 2038.

“A BMSB incursion would affect multiple sectors simultaneously,” Horticulture New Zealand chief executive Mike Chapman says. “This is currently the number one pest threatening horticulture and we are fully supportive of action at the border to keep it out, including the recent moves to prevent ships contaminated with brown marmorated stink bugs from unloading their cargoes in Auckland.”

An incursion would reduce crop yields, increase costs, and lower the export value for exports. At the same time, it would impact on employment, wages, and result in a poorer standard of living, the report says.

NZ Winegrowers Biosecurity and Emergency Response Manager Dr Edwin Massey says the report confirms that brown marmorated stink bug is one of the wine industry’s highest threat biosecurity risks.

“Working through the Government Industry Agreement, we are committed to working with the Crown and other industry groups to mitigate this risk as much as possible.”

The report was commissioned by the Samurai Wasp Steering group and funded by Horticulture New Zealand, New Zealand Winegrowers, Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH), Vegetable Research and Innovation (VR&I), Ministry for Primary Industries, Foundation for Arable Research (FAR), New Zealand Apples & Pears, Summerfruit NZ, and New Zealand Avocado.

The steering group is looking at introduction of a biocontrol, the samurai wasp, to combat BMSB if it establishes in New Zealand. You can find out more about that here.

You can find out more about BMSB and what to do if you find any on the KVH website here.

Media Releases
12 February 2018
Keep sending shiploads of BMSB packing
12 February 2018
Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, says the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) should be congratulated for taking the right action in turning back ships that have...
Keep sending shiploads of BMSB packing
12 February 2018

Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, says the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) should be congratulated for taking the right action in turning back ships that have arrived at our ports carrying hundreds of unwanted pests.

“Over the last few days MPI has turned around two large cargo vessels because one of the most damaging pests to the kiwifruit and wider horticultural industries - the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) – was found hitchhiking on both ships and in used vehicles onboard.”

The BMSB is a pest that could destroy New Zealand’s fruit and vegetable industries. It also infests homes, ruins gardens, and stinks when crushed says Barry.

“It’s not in New Zealand yet and we want to keep it that way – we must do everything we can to keep it out.”

“That is why KVH is pleased with the ongoing diligence of MPI to detect these stink bugs at the border and we fully support the serious steps they have been taking to manage the risk of it getting here, including these recent cases of requiring treatment to take place offshore before allowing high-risk ships and cargo to enter and unload goods at our Ports.”

“The decisions may not always be popular with those importing goods, but the rules are very clear, and they are stringent for a reason. Unwanted pests like the BMSB could cause hundreds of millions of dollars damage to the New Zealand economy and heavily affect growers’ livelihoods if it were to establish here.”

Working alongside MPI, industry groups including KVH have been working hard to raise awareness of the threat and impact of BMSB crossing our borders. This work has included meetings with importers and transporters of machinery and other high-risk goods to ensure they are fully aware of the biosecurity measures they must take. KVH has also been working with kiwifruit growers, Zespri, MPI and the wider kiwifruit industry to ensure preparedness for BMSB, if it were to arrive and establish here. This includes running awareness programmes and simulation exercises.

More information about BMSB, including video showing the destructive impacts it has had on kiwifruit orchards in Italy and the way it is affecting lifestyles in the USA, can be viewed on the KVH website.

⇤ First⟵ Prev12Next ⟶Last ⇥

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz