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Biosecurity News
17 October 2019
Check nearby pine blocks for wild kiwifruit
17 October 2019
Wild kiwifruit can readily establish in any scrub, native bush or forestry block close to producing orchards.  Over winter, birds sometimes feed on the few fruit missed by the picking team and...
Check nearby pine blocks for wild kiwifruit
17 October 2019

Wild kiwifruit can readily establish in any scrub, native bush or forestry block close to producing orchards. 

Over winter, birds sometimes feed on the few fruit missed by the picking team and spread the seed into nearby areas, especially those within 200 to 400 metres of the orchard.

Kiwifruit seems to prefer an association with pines and will germinate in the needle cast. Contractors record the numbers of plants controlled in various locations, and there are routinely four to five times as many wild kiwifruit seedlings in a pine block compared to native bush.  So, now is a good time to check that nearby forestry block for wild kiwifruit.  The bright emergent leaves are usually quite visible right now.

KVH and all regional councils work together to ensure that wild kiwifruit is destroyed wherever it occurs. Please report infestations to your local regional council biosecurity officer, or to KVH. A photo, map location, or GPS coordinates are extra helpful.

Image: A heavy infestation of wild kiwifruit in a pine block and coming into leaf during spring. This infestation is scheduled for destruction. 

Protocols & Movement Controls
17 October 2019
Reminder of orchard management requirements timeline
17 October 2019
Growers are reminded that one of the requirements within the National Psa-V Pest Management Plan (NPMP) is to ensure that kiwifruit orchards meet required management standards. Any orchards...
Reminder of orchard management requirements timeline
17 October 2019

Growers are reminded that one of the requirements within the National Psa-V Pest Management Plan (NPMP) is to ensure that kiwifruit orchards meet required management standards.

Any orchards unpicked and unpruned are in breach of KVH requirements that they be picked by 1 July; pruned and tied down (female vines) by 1 October yearly; and a crop protection product, effective against Psa applied at least yearly.

If you are aware of any unmanaged or abandoned kiwifruit orchards, please contact KVH. If an orchardist or orchard manager thinks they are unable to meet all requirements, contact KVH so that we are aware of your situation and can discuss and agree a way forward.

Grower News
17 October 2019
Kiwifruit Biosecurity Grower Day
17 October 2019
We look forward to seeing those of you who have registered for the sold-out grower biosecurity day next week as part of the region’s Spotlight on Biosecurity events. Date: Wednesday 23 October...
Kiwifruit Biosecurity Grower Day
17 October 2019

We look forward to seeing those of you who have registered for the sold-out grower biosecurity day next week as part of the region’s Spotlight on Biosecurity events.

Date: Wednesday 23 October 2019
Time: 9.00am – 1.00pm
Location: Mount Surf Club, 21 Adams Avenue, Mount Maunganui – Downstairs Function Room

The session will commence at 9.00am. Please allow plenty of time for parking and getting to the venue. Unfortunately, there is not any allocated parking, although you may park in the Surf Club carpark if there are spaces available.

Grower News
17 October 2019
Your free 2020 calendar
17 October 2019
If you or your organisation would like one of the fantastic, bright and colourful Port of Tauranga Biosecurity Excellence 2020 unwanted pest calendars (created by KVH, Biosecurity New Zealand and the...
Your free 2020 calendar
17 October 2019

If you or your organisation would like one of the fantastic, bright and colourful Port of Tauranga Biosecurity Excellence 2020 unwanted pest calendars (created by KVH, Biosecurity New Zealand and the Port of Tauranga) send us an email letting us know your postal address and we’ll get one in the mail to you.

We’ll also have the calendars at next weeks Biosecurity Week events so be sure to collect one if you’re coming along. 

Biosecurity News
17 October 2019
In the news
17 October 2019
First visa cancellation for biosecurity breach: Officials at Sydney International Airport have used new legislation to cancel a passenger’s visitor visa for the first time because of a serious...
In the news
17 October 2019

First visa cancellation for biosecurity breach: Officials at Sydney International Airport have used new legislation to cancel a passenger’s visitor visa for the first time because of a serious biosecurity breach. The passenger, a 45-year-old woman from Vietnam, had her visitor visa cancelled for failing to declare an extensive cache of food concealed in her luggage, including over 4.5 kilos of pork. 

Travellers returning from Rugby World Cup urged to look out for sneaky stink bug: New Zealanders travelling to the Rugby World Cup in Japan are being urged to keep an eye out for an unwanted hitchhiker which could devastate the agriculture industry. The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is a major concern to primary industry groups because it can destroy fruit and vegetable crops and Biosecurity Minister, Damien O'Connor said with the high-risk season for the bug underway, biosecurity officials were on high alert to keep it out of the country.

Mount Maunganui 'could slide into the ocean' if myrtle rust kills pōhutakawa: There are grave concerns for the health of one of New Zealand's iconic maunga, or mountains, as the country struggles to stop the spread of myrtle rust. If the disease takes hold in the Bay of Plenty, the landscape may change forever says Carlton Bidois from the Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital initiative.

Biosecurity News
3 October 2019
Challenging spring conditions
3 October 2019
The hail event in the Hawkes Bay this week is a reminder of the fickleness of spring weather, with extreme events like this increasing Psa risk through the creation of wounds via leaf shatter....
Challenging spring conditions
3 October 2019

The hail event in the Hawkes Bay this week is a reminder of the fickleness of spring weather, with extreme events like this increasing Psa risk through the creation of wounds via leaf shatter.

Affected growers should apply a Psa protectant as soon possible, and on sites where Psa risk is higher bactericides should be considered. If growers are planning to use bio stimulants to help recover vines a reminder to ensure a 7-day window is maintained between these and copper. Actigard may also be applied once vines start to recover.

Looking ahead to next week, the Psa Risk Model again predicts moderate to high-risk weather in many areas particularly in the Waikato and Bay of Plenty. 

Biosecurity News
3 October 2019
BMSB in the Bay
3 October 2019
Remain calm, we’re fortunately not talking about the real thing. The Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) team KVH is part of has had a banner installed on one of the GrainCorp silos in...
BMSB in the Bay
3 October 2019

Remain calm, we’re fortunately not talking about the real thing.

The Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) team KVH is part of has had a banner installed on one of the GrainCorp silos in Mount Maunganui, raising awareness about the importance of keeping New Zealand stink bug free.

We’re in the high-risk season for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and the banner includes a giant image showing what to look out for, as well as the tag line ‘catch it snap it report it’ and the number for the Biosecurity New Zealand 0800 hotline.  To top it all off and add to the visual there are also several stink bugs (stickers) crawling their way round the tank.

The banner is in a high traffic area (along Hewletts Road, near the corner of Totara Street) and we’ve already had a lot of great feedback about how noticeable it is.  It will be up for a few more weeks, until the end of the regions Spotlight on Biosecurity Week in late October.

You may have also read in SunLive over the weekend an article about the banner and work being done by industry groups to keep this unwanted pest out of New Zealand.

Biosecurity News
3 October 2019
Identifying pampas from the native toetoe in early October
3 October 2019
Now is a good time to identify the South American pampas – an invasive plant with seeds causing problems for pack-houses at picking time.  The wind-borne seeds attached to fruit are a...
Identifying pampas from the native toetoe in early October
3 October 2019

Now is a good time to identify the South American pampas – an invasive plant with seeds causing problems for pack-houses at picking time. 

The wind-borne seeds attached to fruit are a serious reject factor, excluding fruit from some markets.  Make sure that you can identify pampas and destroy all plants growing near your orchard.

Pampas flower heads emerged earlier this year (March/April) but are still very upright and although weather-beaten, remain quite cone-shaped. 

Toetoe flowered in November/December and the flag-like flower heads have all but disintegrated. Toetoe will flower again in the next two months.

Control pampas by carefully applying glyphosate herbicide, one part to 50 parts water (2%). Some contractors manage to chainsaw it off at ground level and apply one-part glyphosate to 20 parts water to the basal leaves.  Wear protective clothing/gloves if getting into pampas.

If you can see lots of upright flower heads in early October, it’s pampas.

 

Protocols & Movement Controls
3 October 2019
Mandatory monitroing reminder
3 October 2019
All growers in Exclusion regions and all growers with ‘Not Detected’ orchards in all regions are required to carry out a round of Psa mandatory monitoring from mid-September with results...
Mandatory monitroing reminder
3 October 2019

All growers in Exclusion regions and all growers with ‘Not Detected’ orchards in all regions are required to carry out a round of Psa mandatory monitoring from mid-September with results due to KVH by Thursday 31 October.

To assist growers, an online monitoring form is available here. Please call KVH on 0800 665 825 if you have any questions or require assistance to complete the form.

If Psa-like symptoms are found for the first time on an orchard, report these to KVH. Growers can also contact their pack-house technical representative for advice and sample collection if required.

Biosecurity News
3 October 2019
Week long Spotlight on Biosecurity
3 October 2019
The Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) Spotlight on Biosecurity week will get underway Monday 21 October, with a range of local activities celebrating biosecurity awareness and the role...
Week long Spotlight on Biosecurity
3 October 2019

The Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) Spotlight on Biosecurity week will get underway Monday 21 October, with a range of local activities celebrating biosecurity awareness and the role everyone in the community plays in protecting our local environment and economy from biosecurity threats.

There will be a symposium celebrating the first anniversary of the initiative on the Tuesday. The event will bring together iwi, business and community groups as well as environmental and biosecurity/biodiversity leaders to showcase how biosecurity capability is being built across the region and the gains that have been made in the last 12 months.

There are two other key activities during the week KVH is heavily involved in – one is the Kiwifruit Grower Biosecurity Day on the Wednesday which will include an exclusive session with Professor Acelino Alfenas from Clonar / University of Vicosa, Brazil who will discuss research into Brazilian Wilt, a soil-borne disease of concern, and the importance of traceability. Presentations will also cover BMSB preparedness and on-orchard management, plus latest news and lessons from research initiatives. (This event is a sellout but you can waitlist.) 

The other is the Port of Tauranga Biosecurity Excellence programme, which as per previous years involves the Port, KVH and Biosecurity New Zealand working with Port staff and contractors during the week to raise awareness of the importance of best-practice when it comes to biosecurity vigilance, what pests to be on the lookout for, and how to report unusual finds.

Learn more about TMBC’s pioneering approach to biosecurity in this One News video.

Biosecurity News
3 October 2019
Biosecurity agenda at international kiwifruit meeting
3 October 2019
KVH Chief Executive Stu Hutchings discussed New Zealand’s biosecurity activities at the 38th International Kiwifruit Organization (IKO) meeting in Italy recently. Also attended by NZKGI and...
Biosecurity agenda at international kiwifruit meeting
3 October 2019

KVH Chief Executive Stu Hutchings discussed New Zealand’s biosecurity activities at the 38th International Kiwifruit Organization (IKO) meeting in Italy recently.

Also attended by NZKGI and Zespri representatives, the annual meeting provides an opportunity for international counterparts from countries where kiwifruit is grown to share news and opportunities. Stu provided an update about how we manage Psa, the Auckland fruit fly responses, our preparedness planning for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and the successful application late last year for the use of the Samurai Wasp in the event of an incursion, and emerging risks.

Following the meeting, Stu visited kiwifruit orchards and nurseries around Bologna and Cisterna. BMSB continues to create crop damage and fruit drop across a range of horticulture industries - including kiwifruit - while the development of kiwifruit vine decline syndrome or Moria Disease in some orchards in the north of Italy and latterly moving south into the Latina region is also causing concern.

The significance of these pests and diseases cannot be underestimated and the visits provided excellent opportunity to talk to local experts and understand the research going into developing early detection and management methodology.

You can read more about the success of the IKO meeting in FruitNet news here.

Biosecurity News
3 October 2019
Connecting biosecurity knowledge across communities
3 October 2019
Last month KVH attended the 2019 APEN (Australia-Pacific Extension Network) conference in Darwin. This visit to the Top End offered a chance to meet and learn from a diverse range of extension...
Connecting biosecurity knowledge across communities
3 October 2019

Last month KVH attended the 2019 APEN (Australia-Pacific Extension Network) conference in Darwin. This visit to the Top End offered a chance to meet and learn from a diverse range of extension professionals from primary industries, education and research groups from across Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific.

Themed Extending horizons, the conference emphasis was on the value of connecting growers and communities with research, tools and technologies to allow them to prepare for and prosper through changes affecting primary industries now and into the future.

Keynote speakers acknowledged climate change, biosecurity, retention of licence to operate and sustainability as current and future challenges and pointed to the value of working collaboratively within industry and with governments to bring about new and better practices. 

Creating networks that encompass diverse views and learning to move past resistance to change were considered important tasks for primary industries as together everyone works towards feeding local and global populations into the future.

The 196 delegates shared 19 hours of presentations, and amazing “only in the Northern territory” field trips to a crocodile farm, the buffalo dairy industry, Adelaide river wetlands, the Darwin aquaculture centre and Darwin’s medical research institute which is a global leader in tropical research.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz