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Biosecurity News
8 February 2018
Managing imports and the BMSB threat
8 February 2018
KVH has put forward a submission to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on proposed amendments to the import standard for ‘vehicles, machinery and equipment’. Although there are...
Managing imports and the BMSB threat
8 February 2018

KVH has put forward a submission to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on proposed amendments to the import standard for ‘vehicles, machinery and equipment’.

Although there are multiple potential ways BMSB could enter New Zealand, interception data demonstrates that the ‘vehicles, machinery and equipment’ pathway is high-risk. This is especially the case from countries where BMSB is found in large numbers, undergoing population growth, or expansion across regions – for example in the USA, Italy, and several other countries across Europe.

MPI have done a good job by introducing new measures on this pathway to provide greater biosecurity protection for New Zealand and KVH fully supports this. Our submission provided additional feedback to strengthen proposed measures and reduce the risk of BMSB establishing.

The main points our submission to MPI specifically covered were:

-        the need to carefully manage, and be able to regularly amend, the countries to which BMSB treatments apply;

-        the importance of clear and practical regulations around the application of heat/fumigation treatments, and storage and transport of consignments before export to New Zealand,

-         treatment verification and follow-up in the event of failure.

Growers will be kept up-to-date with further KVH involvement in the consultation process. 

 

Biosecurity News
8 February 2018
From the frontline
8 February 2018
The summer rush is on and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has been handling a substantial volume of passengers at our airports.  Numbers at Auckland have been up 5% on last year, and...
From the frontline
8 February 2018

The summer rush is on and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has been handling a substantial volume of passengers at our airports.  Numbers at Auckland have been up 5% on last year, and more than 18,000 travellers were processed on the airports busiest day.

Statistics for December alone: 

·         692,088 air passengers processed

·         1,412 infringement notices issued

·         3,008 mail items opened and inspected

·         1,233 loaded containers inspected

Some weird and wonderful interceptions of interest from our borders over the period include: 

·         A Belgian air passenger was forced to leave New Zealand after attempting to smuggle three sausages (spotted by an x-ray operator) into Auckland in a backpack.

·         A 16kg box of abandoned apples found at Wellington airport. MPI officials inspected them and thankfully there were no signs of fruit fly found.

·         An ornamental reindeer made of dried vines was part of the Christmas decorations on a private jet from China. Because the plane was headed for other domestic airports the reindeer couldn’t travel any further and had to be destroyed.

·         A Western Conifer Seed Bug (from the same family as Brown Marmorated Stink Bug) was found in an imported vehicle. The bug has an appetite for fir trees and is a nuisance in homes over winter.

·         Taika Waititi and Hilary Swank were in New Zealand over the summer and he took the opportunity to remind social media followers of the apple incident of 2005, when MPI fined the actress for not declaring an apple.  The post certainly had people thinking about New Zealand’s biosecurity rules as it built up more than 60,000 likes.

MPI produce a regular newsletter about what’s being done at the border to keep unwanted pests and diseases at bay. It also includes interesting data and you can subscribe here.

 

Biosecurity News
8 February 2018
Controlling the stink bug problem
8 February 2018
KVH has been working with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), Horticulture NZ, and other industry groups on an application to release a biological control that would help the fight for...
Controlling the stink bug problem
8 February 2018

KVH has been working with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), Horticulture NZ, and other industry groups on an application to release a biological control that would help the fight for eradication in the event of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) establishing here.

One of the most promising control strategies currently being pursued, the Samurai Wasp (Trissolcus japonicas) is a natural enemy of the BMSB and it’s thought to be effective in suppressing populations by up to 80%.

The application to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is on behalf of the BMSB Council – which KVH is a member of, alongside other signatories to the BMSB Operational Agreement – and seeks official pre-approval for the importation and release of the Samurai Wasp into the New Zealand environment, when there is a BMSB incursion or established population found.

The application is seeking pre-approval as rapid release of large numbers of the wasp during the early phase of a BMSB incursion would be a critical part of eradication efforts. Even if eradication wasn’t successful, early release and establishment of populations of the wasp would still act as a biocontrol and reduce the likelihood of large populations of BMSB developing.

Any grower who wants to know more about the work being done in this area can contact KVH for more information.

The full application document will be made available as part of the EPA consultation process, which will also include a submission period that growers can take part in to show support or raise any concerns. KVH will keep growers updated about the timings around this process. 

Grower News
8 February 2018
Unusual symptoms made simple
8 February 2018
When information about unusual symptoms is reported to KVH (by growers, contractors, packhouse staff and others visiting orchards) it is then looked into to be sure that any biosecurity risk is...
Unusual symptoms made simple
8 February 2018

When information about unusual symptoms is reported to KVH (by growers, contractors, packhouse staff and others visiting orchards) it is then looked into to be sure that any biosecurity risk is identified, managed and the growers involved are well supported if any further action needs to be taken.

KVH prepares full reports on every investigation which you can now read about on our website using our handy and simple table that outlines unusual symptoms that have been seen on kiwifruit orchards and includes photos.

This information is provided to help growers, and others in the kiwifruit industry, identify similar symptoms they may be seeing on their own properties and to increase general awareness of how growers need to be reporting unusual symptoms that they may be seeing.

Grower News
8 February 2018
Keep the reports coming
8 February 2018
KVH often receives phone calls and emails from growers, packhouses, and members of the public who think they may have found a pest or bug from our most unwanted list. Although the finds often turn...
Keep the reports coming
8 February 2018

KVH often receives phone calls and emails from growers, packhouses, and members of the public who think they may have found a pest or bug from our most unwanted list. Although the finds often turn out to be native, the reports are a good thing and show that as an industry we’re on the lookout for biosecurity risk.

The message is the same for growers, contractors and anyone else on-orchard: stay vigilant, be on the lookout and report anything unusual. Please take a photo (very rarely will we need to see the actual specimen) of what you find and send it to us at info@kvh.org.nz so we can have a look at it for you.

Don’t be afraid to report any suspect finds. Early detection is key to eradication and the sooner you alert us the more we can do to help.

We’re at the height of the risk-period for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and fruit flies. Be especially aware of any larvae in fruit. Read more about latest interceptions on the KVH website.

Company Notices
1 February 2018
Keep in touch
1 February 2018
KVH offers a range of ways for you to keep up to date with all things related to kiwifruit biosecurity and vine health. We publish articles in our online Newsroom regularly. These articles...
Keep in touch
1 February 2018

KVH offers a range of ways for you to keep up to date with all things related
to kiwifruit biosecurity and vine health.


We publish articles in our online Newsroom regularly.

These articles incorporate feature stories that highlight best practice biosecurity, incursions across the world that we are monitoring, investments in research and development, and how the kiwifruit industry manages the risk of pests spreading in New Zealand.

You can sign up to our e-news Bulletin for fortnightly biosecurity bursts. We distribute Special Bulletins to our e-news database when significant biosecurity events take place.

Those working within the biosecurity or kiwifruit fields can sign up to the monthly Snapshot for a round-up of key information that can be easily re-produced in staff or customer briefings and newsletters.

Don’t forget to follow us on social media for biosecurity tips and news. We have Facebook, Twitter and YouTube pages.

To subscribe or find out more email info@kvh.org.nz or phone 0800 665 825.

 

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
Learning more about the spread of myrtle rust
25 January 2018
The latest update from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) late last week confirmed there are now 218 properties infected with myrtle rust, including 13 reinfections. Nine new sites have...
Learning more about the spread of myrtle rust
25 January 2018

The latest update from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) late last week confirmed there are now 218 properties infected with myrtle rust, including 13 reinfections.

Nine new sites have been confirmed in Taranaki, Waikato, Auckland, Wellington and the Bay of Plenty – where there is now a total of 50 infected sites.

Surveillance continues in the known affected areas as well as high-risk areas in Northland, and the top of the South Island. The Department of Conservation (DOC) will undertake further surveillance in targeted areas on public conservation land through to March.

Myrtle rust has proven to be very aggressive in some New Zealand conditions. As a result, MPI is focusing efforts and resources in areas that will ensure the very best chance to minimise the impacts of the disease in the longer term, and is adapting to a long-term management approach.

Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit plants or vines, you may see it on other plants on your orchard or home garden. There are recommendations for home gardeners, nursey owners, and beekeepers on the MPI website. 

If you think you have found myrtle rust, don’t touch it – take a photo and call MPI on 0800 80 99 66. Be on the lookout for big yellow powdery eruptions on either or both sides of the leaf; brown/grey rust pustules (older spores) which appear on older lesions; and buckled or twisted leaves which may die off.

A useful free app -
Myrtle Rust Reporter - has also been created to quickly and easily let officials know of any symptoms.

 

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
Keeping girdles safe from Psa
25 January 2018
Previous Plant and Food Research (P&FR) trials showed that Psa can enter kiwifruit plants via girdles, remain within the girdle for at least five weeks, and move from the girdle point through the...
Keeping girdles safe from Psa
25 January 2018

Previous Plant and Food Research (P&FR) trials showed that Psa can enter kiwifruit plants via girdles, remain within the girdle for at least five weeks, and move from the girdle point through the plant.

Cleaning and sterilising girdling tools between plants is therefore strongly recommended as best practice to reduce risk of introducing and transferring Psa between plants.

A recent P&FR report monitoring the effectiveness of wound protectants against Psa has also shown that the current grower practice of spraying girdling wounds with a solution of label rate copper was sufficient to prevent infection of girdles. This practice also allowed wound healing, with callus formation not obviously inhibited by application of the Nordox solution. Previously, science had shown that unprotected girdles can be infected for at least 15 days after girdling. This new result supports recommended best practice.  

The report also notes that neither copper paste nor Inocbloc paste should be applied to girdling wounds. Copper paste did not provide protection and application of Inocbloc interfered with wound healing. These products were however the most effective wound protectant on pruning cuts.

A copy of this report will be available shortly on the KVH website.
 

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
New Queensland Fruit Fly interceptions
25 January 2018
Latest border interception information on fruit flies has been published in the January KVH risk update, showing that our biggest threat – the Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) – was found twice...
New Queensland Fruit Fly interceptions
25 January 2018

Latest border interception information on fruit flies has been published in the January KVH risk update, showing that our biggest threat – the Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) – was found twice over the Christmas holiday period.

The first QFF interception of dead larvae was on imported oranges in commercial sea cargo that arrived in Christchurch from Australia. In the second case, three live larvae were found on chillies that were declared by an air passenger.

Incorporating the latest data from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), the update also includes surveillance trapping information and from almost 8,000 traps in place, no fruit flies of concern have been found.

There have been several fruit fly responses featured in the media recently, reminding us of the risk these organisms present. In the USA, Mediterranean Fruit Fly has been detected in California and there is currently a Mexican Fruit Fly response underway in San Diego County following detection of seven flies. As part of this response 325,000 sterile male flies (per square mile for 50 miles) have been released around the infestation site and a 65sqm quarantine area.

Further south, there are currently two Mediterranean Fruit Fly responses in Chile – both in the greater Santiago city area.

Closer to home, there are two Queensland Fruit Fly outbreaks in Adelaide being managed by biosecurity officials, and two cases in Tasmania currently being investigated. Due to the proximity to our border, these are most significant for New Zealand and KVH is closely following the situation.

The risk period for fruit flies in New Zealand stretches over the summer until June. Remain vigilant, know what to look for, and what to do if you suspect you may have found any kind of unwanted fruit fly or larvae. Fact sheets about fruit flies are available on the KVH website.
 

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
Measuring Psa weather risk online
25 January 2018
Developed as a weather-based decision support system, the online Psa Risk Model helps growers with orchard management in a Psa environment. It includes actual weather station data and weather...
Measuring Psa weather risk online
25 January 2018

Developed as a weather-based decision support system, the online Psa Risk Model helps growers with orchard management in a Psa environment. It includes actual weather station data and weather forecast details to provide disease information and interpretations.

Recently, we’ve had a few calls asking for clarification about the low Psa risk forecast by the model.

Risk is influenced by both temperature and wetness. Where temperatures are above 20 degrees infection is unlikely (based on the Psa growth model research) so the model has often recorded light risk, even during days of rain. The online model has been checked by experts and has been accurately recording risk through the recent warm and wet weather period.

Growers can hover over the models ‘predicted temperatures plot’ to determine forecast temperatures. Where the mean day/night temperatures are 20 degrees or more, growers will notice the risk drops significantly.

It would be prudent to protect damaged canes on sites where Psa has remained a problem through late spring and early summer, and where innoculum load is likely higher - particularly if new growth is present or pruning rounds have been completed since copper was applied. Also, take care to avoid applying copper in high humidity or through the heat of the day, to minimise any risk of fruit marking or phytotoxicity.

Read more about how to make the most of the Psa Risk Model and how to easily log in here.

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
What is GIA and how does it work?
25 January 2018
Ensuring we have an effective biosecurity system is a joint effort. All New Zealanders – industries, individuals, government, and other organisations – need to work together and jointly...
What is GIA and how does it work?
25 January 2018

Ensuring we have an effective biosecurity system is a joint effort. All New Zealanders – industries, individuals, government, and other organisations – need to work together and jointly take responsibility for the risks they create or are best placed to manage.

It’s for more than just interventions that occur at the border. It includes activities to manage risk offshore and activities past our border to eradicate or manage pests and diseases.

The Government Industry Agreement (GIA) initiative is a partnership between government and industry for improving New Zealand’s biosecurity. It involves working together to plan biosecurity readiness and response activities, and sharing decision-making, as well as costs.

The GIA provides the opportunity for joint decision making of the things that industry says are important. It provides certainty that the things that really matter to industry are being addressed. Better preparedness will result in faster and less costly responses that are more likely to eradicate or control pests and diseases. This will likely also reduce impacts on production and market access.

KVH was the first primary industry to sign the GIA Deed in May 2014. This marked a significant achievement for the kiwifruit industry and government.

The GIA Deed outlines the principles for the partnership and the commitments that each Signatory makes. For example, as a Deed Signatory, KVH negotiates and agrees the priority pests and diseases of most concern to the kiwifruit industry and agrees actions to minimise the risk and impact of an incursion. We work through the details of responses, including roles and responsibilities and cost-sharing.

KVH has been at the forefront of formally developing and finalising these details, known as Operational Agreements (OA). The first OA under GIA was the multi-sector agreement for the management of fruit fly in New Zealand. In March 2017 KVH signed a second agreement, on behalf of the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors, to help reduce the damaging impacts of four sector specific threats - Ceratocystis fimbriata, Verticillium Wilt, Psa-non New Zealand strains and Invasive Phytophthoras. A third OA for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) was signed in mid-July 2017.

For more information about GIA and how KVH is working with government to fight pest threats, read the feature article in the KVH Annual Report. You can also read more here about KVH readiness and response activities.
 

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
Making use of the Psa Risk Model
25 January 2018
A reminder that KVH has developed an online video tutorial to guide growers through the Psa Risk Model. Developed as an online, weather-based decision support system, the model helps growers with...
Making use of the Psa Risk Model
25 January 2018

A reminder that KVH has developed an online video tutorial to guide growers through the Psa Risk Model.

Developed as an online, weather-based decision support system, the model helps growers with orchard management in a Psa environment. It includes actual weather station data and weather forecast details to provide customised access to unique disease information and interpretations.

Click here to view the tutorial and click here to access the model. Please note, growers must register first – this is to protect the IP in the model and keep costs for the service down. If you haven’t already done so, please register now.

For quick and easy access to the model:

-         We recommend using the Firefox or Google Chrome browsers, as Internet Explorer does not support the software used.

-         When you log in using your email address and password, tick the ‘remember me’ box so that your computer remembers your details and you won’t have to enter them each time.

-         If internet speed is an issue for you, setting a shorter time in the model will help the download pace.

-         If you have any queries please contat KVH on 0800 665 825 or email us. We’re happy to help.

 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz