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Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Distant experts fight bug threat
22 August 2019
Two scientists on opposite sides of the world are at the forefront of the battle to keep some of the most insidious, damaging pests at bay from valuable food crops. This summer in northern Italy they...
Distant experts fight bug threat
22 August 2019

Two scientists on opposite sides of the world are at the forefront of the battle to keep some of the most insidious, damaging pests at bay from valuable food crops. This summer in northern Italy they are working closely in an effort to try to stymie the spread of the voracious Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) there and keep it out of New Zealand entirely.

Professors Claudio Ioriatti of Foundazione Edmund Mach and Max Suckling of New Zealand’s Plant and Food Research and University of Auckland spoke to
Farmers Weekly last week about their battle with bugs across the hemispheres:

Standing in an orchard in the warm north Italian sunshine Professor Max Suckling casts a rueful eye towards the mountains surrounding the Trento district.

“I am sure those hills are crawling with them,” he observes, referring to the BMSB flitting and crawling across the ripening apples next to him.

The stink bug has already almost wiped out Italy’s €300 million pear industry and now threatens Trento’s 10,000 hectares of apple crops. Its impact in NZ would devastate the horticultural sector and significantly increase the amount of sprays used on remaining fruit, losing NZ fruit’s premium as a low-residue fruit supplier.


Read more here.

Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Virginian apple grower experience of BMSB
22 August 2019
Last week KVH travelled to the Hawkes Bay to join a workshop hosted by New Zealand Apples & Pears which focused on mid to long-term management of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). Bill...
Virginian apple grower experience of BMSB
22 August 2019

Last week KVH travelled to the Hawkes Bay to join a workshop hosted by New Zealand Apples & Pears which focused on mid to long-term management of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

Bill Mackintosh, who was also a speaker at the Apples & Pears annual conference this year, set the scene sharing first-hand experience of the damage, control and secondary pest problems associated with BMSB in his home region of West Virginia.

Bill grows apples, pears and peaches and commented that trapping and control methods are continually improving, with growers benefiting from United States Department of Agriculture research into control methods.

Most growers now reduce damage through application of border sprays four to five times a year, although in years where BMSB levels are high, growers may still repeatedly spray whole orchards. Residue profiles for fruit sprayed to protect against BMSB are a real challenge as treated fruit loses access to premium markets (which demand residue free fruit). The rise in pests previously controlled through well-developed integrated fruit production programmes has also impacted grower returns and viability. Populations of western flower thrips, woolly aphids and St Jose scale, have all bounced back since pyrethroids have been applied.

Bill emphasised the importance of early detection and prompted all growers and field staff to be on constant watch for all life stages of BMSB, and to pay close attention to any unusual crop damage. He recalls poor storage quality was reported for local apple crops in the years leading up to the 2010 BMSB population explosion, and in hindsight believes that internal damage, diagnosed then as calcium deficiency, may well have been early sightings of BMSB damage. Small droplets on the skin of developing fruit, with no apparent cause were also a clue sometimes picked up by the keen eye.

Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Phytophthora planning underway
22 August 2019
Last week a one-day symposium on Phytophthora was held in Auckland as part of the New Zealand Plant Protection Society (NZPPS) Conference. Phytophthora has had a lot of attention recently as it...
Phytophthora planning underway
22 August 2019

Last week a one-day symposium on Phytophthora was held in Auckland as part of the New Zealand Plant Protection Society (NZPPS) Conference.

Phytophthora has had a lot of attention recently as it continues to spread globally and cause devastation to a range of cultivated and natural environments. Notable species in New Zealand include Phytophthora agathidicida which causes Kauri Dieback, P. pluvialis which is causing Red Needle Cast in pine, and P. cinnamomi which is causing problems for Avocados.

The symposium drew on a broad range of speakers, both locally and internationally, bringing a unique global perspective. Matt Dyck from KVH and Dr. Sonia Whiteman from Zespri presented on the risk of Invasive Phytophthora to kiwifruit.  They covered the recent literature review commissioned to better understand that risk, as well as the importance of learning more about which species could potentially impact us here in New Zealand. They also noted the preparation underway through our readiness and response plan which is currently being developed in conjunction with Biosecurity New Zealand.

Company Notices
22 August 2019
Help spread the biosecurity word online
22 August 2019
You, your family and friends can follow KVH on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube social media pages. We use the pages to engage with more people across the wider kiwifruit industry and share...
Help spread the biosecurity word online
22 August 2019

You, your family and friends can follow KVH on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube social media pages.

We use the pages to engage with more people across the wider kiwifruit industry and share biosecurity messages with the public. It’s important to us that everyone is involved in biosecurity and sees that they have a part to play in helping keep out unwanted pests and threats.

Being online also enables us to spread messages more efficiently and quickly when we need to let people know about new incursions, any effects they may or may not have on the kiwifruit industry), and what actions people may need to take. You can follow us on Twitter ‘@KVHNZ’ or find us on Facebook and YouTube at ‘Kiwifruit Vine Health – KVH’.

Protocols & Movement Controls
22 August 2019
South Island Controlled Area Notices
22 August 2019
KVH is aware of an increasing, but still currently small number, of kiwifruit-related enterprises establishing in isolated areas of the South Island.  These locations are all outside of the...
South Island Controlled Area Notices
22 August 2019

KVH is aware of an increasing, but still currently small number, of kiwifruit-related enterprises establishing in isolated areas of the South Island.  These locations are all outside of the South Island Exclusion region and include a small male kiwifruit orchard at Karamea; a nursery producing kiwifruit plants at Te Anau; a Christchurch nursery growing kiwifruit plants; and a University housing kiwifruit seedlings for research purposes.

KVH has worked with the owners or managers of each of these sites, and is using provisions of the Biosecurity Act and National Psa-V Pest Management Plan (NPMP) that allow KVH to declare Controlled Areas to limit any potential spread of Psa. 

The owners and managers have all been supportive of KVH actions to further protect these areas and enterprises.  A regional classification map and information about the controlled areas is available on the KVH website.

A reminder:
- The South Island remains Psa not-detected
- KVH authorisation is required for movement of any risk item such as orchard machinery
- Any movement of kiwifruit plant material (such as plants, budwood, seeds for propagation and pollen) from the North Island to the South Island is prohibited
- Any movement of kiwifruit plant material for research is very strictly regulated.

KVH thanks everyone for their cooperation to ensure that the South Island remains Psa not-detected.

Grower News
14 August 2019
Growers invited to share views on climate change
14 August 2019
We’re already experiencing changes to our climate and we’ll likely see more impacts over the coming decades, like severe weather events, water shortages and changes to disease risk....
Growers invited to share views on climate change
14 August 2019

We’re already experiencing changes to our climate and we’ll likely see more impacts over the coming decades, like severe weather events, water shortages and changes to disease risk. We’re keen to hear what growers think climate change will mean for them on-orchard and how prepared we are as an industry.

Zespri is holding two focus group sessions for growers to share their views.

When: 9am to 12 noon and 1.30pm to 4.30pm on Friday 6 September 2019
Where: Club Mount, 45 Kawaka St, Mount Maunganui
RSVP:
Growers interested in participating are asked to email their name, region, orchard size and cultivars grown to
info@nzkgi.org.nz.

Media Releases
12 August 2019
Auckland fruit fly detections
12 August 2019
Auckland fruit fly response to step-up again As we are nearing the end of winter, the fruit fly response in the Northcote area is about to step-up again, with the focus on maintaining controls...
Auckland fruit fly detections
12 August 2019

Auckland fruit fly response to step-up again

As we are nearing the end of winter, the fruit fly response in the Northcote area is about to step-up again, with the focus on maintaining controls and resuming baiting and more intensive trapping.

Since 26 April, an area of Northcote has been under a Controlled Area Notice, restricting the movement of certain fruit and vegetables out of controlled areas to help prevent the spread of any fruit flies that may still be in the vicinity. Along with the continued movement restrictions, a network of fruit fly surveillance traps which attract male fruit flies have remained in the area over winter and were regularly checked, with the last single male fruit fly detected in the current controlled area on 15 July.

We signalled at the start of winter that we would be stepping up again about now to ensure this significant pest does not establish in New Zealand. We won’t be relaxing our efforts until we are absolutely confident we are rid of these flies. We have found 10 flies in the Northcote area since February, and while we still haven’t found any evidence of larvae, pupae, eggs or female flies, the continued finds indicate that flies could remain in the area, albeit at very low levels.

People in Northcote will be given advanced notice if bait is to be placed in their property, and they will be provided with detailed information about the bait and what’s happening.

Detailed maps of the controlled areas, a full description of the boundaries, and full information about the rules are available on the
Biosecurity New Zealand website.

Grower News
8 August 2019
Kiwifruit Biosecurity Grower Day
8 August 2019
Join KVH and Zespri, as well as special guest speakers, on Wednesday 23 October 2019 for a morning dedicated to learning more about the initiatives underway to protect the New Zealand kiwifruit...
Kiwifruit Biosecurity Grower Day
8 August 2019

Join KVH and Zespri, as well as special guest speakers, on Wednesday 23 October 2019 for a morning dedicated to learning more about the initiatives underway to protect the New Zealand kiwifruit industry from unwanted pests and diseases.

The day will include an exclusive session with Professor Acelino Alfenas from Clonar / University of Vicosa, Brazil who will discuss research into Brazilian Wilt, a soil-borne disease of concern and the importance of traceability. Presentations will also cover BMSB preparedness and on-orchard management, and latest news and lessons from research initiatives.

When: Wednesday 23 October 2019
Where: Mount Surf Club, Adams Avenue, Mount Maunganui
RSVP:
online here 

Biosecurity News
8 August 2019
BMSB warning to importers
8 August 2019
Biosecurity New Zealand has sent a stark message to shippers, agents, and importers that imported cargo must meet new rules intended to keep Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) out of New...
BMSB warning to importers
8 August 2019

Biosecurity New Zealand has sent a stark message to shippers, agents, and importers that imported cargo must meet new rules intended to keep Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) out of New Zealand.

The importing industry needs to be aware that high-risk cargo that hasn't been treated before arrival will not be allowed to come ashore in most instances. The aim is to keep out the highly invasive pest that could devastate New Zealand's horticulture industry if it established here. 

The new rules were formally issued by Biosecurity New Zealand in late July. They require offshore treatment of imported vehicles, machinery, and parts from 33 identified risk countries, and all sea containers from Italy during the stink bug season. In the past, only uncontainerised vehicle cargo from risk countries required treatment before arriving in New Zealand.

Similar to previous years, this season will see increased surveillance and inspection of arriving vessels and cargo from countries with established stink bug populations.

Find out more about the new rules here.

Biosecurity News
8 August 2019
Kiwifruit represented in Biosecurity Act overhaul
8 August 2019
Workshops involving key stakeholders are currently underway across the country for the review of the Biosecurity Act, which was announced by the Minister for Biosecurity last month.   Our...
Kiwifruit represented in Biosecurity Act overhaul
8 August 2019

Workshops involving key stakeholders are currently underway across the country for the review of the Biosecurity Act, which was announced by the Minister for Biosecurity last month.  

Our biosecurity system is underpinned by the Biosecurity Act, which provides the legal framework for Biosecurity New Zealand and other organisations to help keep harmful organisms out of the country. It also provides the framework for how we respond, and manage organisms, if any make it into the country.

KVH attended the Tauranga workshop on behalf of the kiwifruit industry last week, to begin working through a number of key topics including the purpose and principles of the Act, pest management, the import health system, funding and Government Industry Agreements (GIA), compensation, and on-farm/orchard biosecurity practices. From here, Biosecurity New Zealand - who are running the workshops and overhaul process – will use information collected at the workshops as part of an initial review of aspects of the Act that need to be addressed quickly, particularly around funding for biosecurity responses, and how decision-making works between government and industry partners. There will be a public consultation process for this initial stage later this year.

There will also be a second, more extensive and longer wave of work looking at issues that impact New Zealand’s environmental, social and cultural outcomes. Public consultation for this will occur in the second half of 2020.

KVH will continue to be involved in the process over time, ensuring kiwifruit growers influence the development of a new Act. Everyone will have a chance to have a say – we’ll provide updates once formal public consultation begins. You can read more about the overhaul and the Minister’s announcement
here.

Biosecurity News
8 August 2019
New Whangarei Psa-positive orchard
8 August 2019
A further Psa result has been confirmed on a Whangarei orchard this week bringing the total positives in this region to six. Red exudate was observed on one G3 trunk girdle on an orchard which is in...
New Whangarei Psa-positive orchard
8 August 2019

A further Psa result has been confirmed on a Whangarei orchard this week bringing the total positives in this region to six.

Red exudate was observed on one G3 trunk girdle on an orchard which is in close proximity to other positive orchards in the region.

Growers in this and other regions with Not Detected orchards should be monitoring regularly to identify any symptoms. Look for cane dieback and check carefully around any wounds (i.e. grafts, girdles). Young plants are generally more at risk, as are stressed vines or those in cold, damp areas.

There have been a number of high-risk weather events recently and we are coming up to the spring infection period, so it is important to maintain a good protectant spray programme and good hygiene practices.

Biosecurity News
8 August 2019
Biosecurity a top priority for Farmlands
8 August 2019
Last week Farmlands Horticulture provided an opportunity for KVH to present an extended biosecurity update their annual subtropical crops technical update in Mount Maunganui. This reflected their...
Biosecurity a top priority for Farmlands
8 August 2019

Last week Farmlands Horticulture provided an opportunity for KVH to present an extended biosecurity update their annual subtropical crops technical update in Mount Maunganui. This reflected their acknowledgement of biosecurity as a key risk to their shareholder businesses.

KVH Director Simon Cook presented on his Nuffield scholarship travels, sharing insights on the impact of citrus greening in Florida, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) incursion in Chile and the challenging TR4 Banana Panama disease in Queensland. Simon strongly promoted the message of farm gate biosecurity as a key part of protecting horticultural investments.

Erin Lane, KVH’s Biosecurity Analyst provided updates on BMSB at the border, the ongoing fruit fly response and the industry’s “most unwanted” threat list. Discussion of industry readiness plans for Phytophthora illustrated how biosecurity threats can be vectored by people, machinery and soil, and a year in review session reflected on industry and grower reported pests and vine symptoms, some of which have led to new research projects.

The value of a collective approach to produce results was a key take-home message.  KVH acknowledged the on-the-ground expertise of the Farmlands team and the ongoing support provided to growers and industry through their efforts towards lifting awareness around biosecurity on a day-to-day basis. 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz