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Biosecurity News
22 February 2018
Stopping the Yellow Spotted Stink Bug
22 February 2018
The recent border interceptions of not only Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) but Yellow Spotted Stink Bug (YSSB) aswell are a timely and important reminder of how important it is we all know what...
Stopping the Yellow Spotted Stink Bug
22 February 2018

The recent border interceptions of not only Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) but Yellow Spotted Stink Bug (YSSB) aswell are a timely and important reminder of how important it is we all know what these bugs look like and what to do if we find them.

The YSSB is similar to the BMSB in that it is a hitchhiker pest that could have serious impacts on our fruit and vegetable industries, ruin gardens and infest homes.

These bugs are around 18-23mm long (about the size of a 10-cent coin) or larger, and they are bigger than shield bugs currently found in New Zealand. The body is blackish brown and covered entirely with many small yellow spots.

View the YSSB fact sheet on the KVH website and be on the lookout, If you find anything unusual catch it, take a photo, and report it to the pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66.

Biosecurity News
22 February 2018
Unwanted!
22 February 2018
Each month we profile one of the 12 most unwanted pests featured on our ‘Port of Tauranga – committed to biosecurity excellence’ calendar. They could all potentially enter our...
Unwanted!
22 February 2018

Each month we profile one of the 12 most unwanted pests featured on our ‘Port of Tauranga – committed to biosecurity excellence’ calendar. They could all potentially enter our borders and have a major impact on the local community and businesses, the kiwifruit industry or other local growers.

This month, the focus is on Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD). This pest is a threat to fruit crops in every country it has established in, resulting in major economic costs due to control, crop destruction and market access implications.



SWD has a wide range of hosts, including kiwiberries. There is no evidence of impacts to kiwifruit, but market access implications are possible should we have an incursion.  Unlike most other vinegar flies - which attack damaged or rotting fruit - the SWD lays its eggs in ripening fruit, leaving it soft and unmarketable. 

Adults thrive in temperatures up to 25 degrees, making New Zealand a suitable climate for establishment.

This pest is mobile and can fly between local areas, but fresh produce is the most likely long-distance pathway. Read more
here.

Everyone can play a part in keeping unwanted pests and diseases out of New Zealand. If you come across anything unusual, catch it, snap it, and report it to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on 0800 80 99 66.

Biosecurity News
22 February 2018
Fruit fly data and outbreaks close to home
22 February 2018
Latest border interception information on fruit flies has been published in the February KVH risk update. Incorporating the latest data from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), the update...
Fruit fly data and outbreaks close to home
22 February 2018

Latest border interception information on fruit flies has been published in the February KVH risk update.

Incorporating the latest data from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), the update also includes surveillance trapping information. From almost 8,000 traps in place, no fruit flies of concern have been found this high-risk season.

There have been several fruit fly responses featured in the media recently, reminding us of the risk these organisms present. Across the Tasman there are two Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) outbreaks in Adelaide being managed by biosecurity officials, as well as a Mediterranean Fruit Fly outbreak, and QFF responses in Tasmania are currently underway. Latest news out of Western Australia is that an adult female QFF has been found in a surveillance trap just outside of the Fremantle CBD. Because of the proximity to our border, these are all significant for New Zealand and KVH is closely following the situation.

The risk period for fruit flies in New Zealand stretches over the summer until June. Remain vigilant, know what to look for, and what to do if you suspect you may have found any kind of unwanted fruit fly or larvae. Fact sheets about fruit flies are available on the
KVH website.

Protocols & Movement Controls
22 February 2018
Port-harvest biosecurity for packhouses
22 February 2018
The post-harvest protocols have been updated for 2018 and are now available on the KVH website. Minor changes have been made to the requirements for movement of reject fruit in and between Recovery...
Port-harvest biosecurity for packhouses
22 February 2018

The post-harvest protocols have been updated for 2018 and are now available on the KVH website. Minor changes have been made to the requirements for movement of reject fruit in and between Recovery regions.

Post-harvest Biosecurity Risk Management Plans must be signed off before harvest commences this season. The plans must be submitted to KVH by next Wednesday 28 February 2018. Please email these to karyn.lowry@kvh.org.nz.

All bins in all regions must be clear of plant material and sanitised pre-season and between orchards. For sanitiser options refer to the KVH information sheet.

There are additional requirements for postharvest operators moving bins between regions. Refer to the KVH protocol for more information.  KVH inspections still apply to those moving harvest bins into Whangarei and North West Auckland regions.

R&D News
22 February 2018
Latest Psa research now available
22 February 2018
KVH makes decisions and bases advice on key research learnings, industry knowledge and experience. The scientific research publications that drive our policies and management advice are added to...
Latest Psa research now available
22 February 2018

KVH makes decisions and bases advice on key research learnings, industry knowledge and experience.

The scientific research publications that drive our policies and management advice are added to our website as they are finalised. Growers are encouraged to look them up and have a browse of the many different reports we make available.

Recently added:

·         A paper on monitoring effectiveness of wound protectants against Psa. View the report here. 

We mentioned the paper in a January Bulletin we ran a story about new research monitoring the effectiveness of wound protectants against Psa finding that the current grower practice of spraying girdling wounds with a solution of label rate copper was sufficient to prevent infection of girdles.

The report also notes that neither copper paste nor Inocbloc paste should be applied to girdling wounds. Copper paste did not provide protection and application of Inocbloc interfered with wound healing. These products were however the most effective wound protectant on pruning cuts.

Click here to see an enlarged image from the report, showing copper paste treated girdling wounds on Actinidia chinensis var. chinesis ‘Zesy002’ (Gold3) three months after application.

·         A paper on the efficacy of Ambitious on Psa on Hayward has been added under the CPPU and elicitors categories. View the report here.

 

R&D News
22 February 2018
The successful science behind our greatest threat
22 February 2018
Award-winning research behind the kiwifruit industry’s response to Psa is a big reason for the industry’s current success. A team from Plant & Food Research, who were mobilised in...
The successful science behind our greatest threat
22 February 2018

Award-winning research behind the kiwifruit industry’s response to Psa is a big reason for the industry’s current success.

A team from Plant & Food Research, who were mobilised in late 2010 when Psa was first discovered in the Bay of Plenty, has been awarded the 2017 Prime Minister’s Science Prize for their rapid and successful response.



As we know, the arrival of Psa into New Zealand had a major impact on the kiwifruit industry and while we responded strongly with every resource we had at the time, we were not prepared to deal with such a significant incursion.

The research undertaken by the Plant & Food Research team involved an intensive screening programme of Gold3, which included hundreds of genetically-diverse varieties being evaluated to find specific cultivars that had increased tolerance and met the needs of growers, as well as consumers.

Importantly, Plant & Food Research were also the first in the world to develop diagnostics that enabled rapid testing of orchards. A range of agrichemicals were also tested that helped inform growers day-to-day orchard management plans.

Growers use science every day on their orchards as part of best practice and the ambitious standards that were implemented during the Psa response have become the norm. As an industry, we have made sure that everyone who works on or visits a kiwifruit orchard is aware of biosecurity risk and how to manage it.

The New Zealand kiwifruit industry is now considered the world leader in Psa management. We must take forward the learnings from the Psa response, especially what important scientific research like that undertaken by Plant & Food Research has told us.

Investment in science to understand the nature of significant biosecurity threats, and developing tools for their management should they arrive, is a big priority. KVH and Zespri have already invested over $16million in Psa research and innovation to understand how we can better manage the disease and this year we are spending $1million in research for other biosecurity threats. 

Company Notices
22 February 2018
Most used pages on the KVH website
22 February 2018
KVH closely monitors use of the website to make sure the information we are providing is useful and practical, and easy to find. For the three months November 2017 - January 2018 there were more...
Most used pages on the KVH website
22 February 2018

KVH closely monitors use of the website to make sure the information we are providing is useful and practical, and easy to find.

For the three months November 2017 - January 2018 there were more than 22,000 views of pages on the KVH site, by more than 6,500 people. Consistently among the most used pages for each day over the period were the Psa risk model and spray product list.

Media Releases
12 February 2018
Keep sending shiploads of BMSB packing
12 February 2018
Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, says the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) should be congratulated for taking the right action in turning back ships that have...
Keep sending shiploads of BMSB packing
12 February 2018

Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, says the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) should be congratulated for taking the right action in turning back ships that have arrived at our ports carrying hundreds of unwanted pests.

“Over the last few days MPI has turned around two large cargo vessels because one of the most damaging pests to the kiwifruit and wider horticultural industries - the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) – was found hitchhiking on both ships and in used vehicles onboard.”

The BMSB is a pest that could destroy New Zealand’s fruit and vegetable industries. It also infests homes, ruins gardens, and stinks when crushed says Barry.

“It’s not in New Zealand yet and we want to keep it that way – we must do everything we can to keep it out.”

“That is why KVH is pleased with the ongoing diligence of MPI to detect these stink bugs at the border and we fully support the serious steps they have been taking to manage the risk of it getting here, including these recent cases of requiring treatment to take place offshore before allowing high-risk ships and cargo to enter and unload goods at our Ports.”

“The decisions may not always be popular with those importing goods, but the rules are very clear, and they are stringent for a reason. Unwanted pests like the BMSB could cause hundreds of millions of dollars damage to the New Zealand economy and heavily affect growers’ livelihoods if it were to establish here.”

Working alongside MPI, industry groups including KVH have been working hard to raise awareness of the threat and impact of BMSB crossing our borders. This work has included meetings with importers and transporters of machinery and other high-risk goods to ensure they are fully aware of the biosecurity measures they must take. KVH has also been working with kiwifruit growers, Zespri, MPI and the wider kiwifruit industry to ensure preparedness for BMSB, if it were to arrive and establish here. This includes running awareness programmes and simulation exercises.

More information about BMSB, including video showing the destructive impacts it has had on kiwifruit orchards in Italy and the way it is affecting lifestyles in the USA, can be viewed on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
8 February 2018
Moth plant: act now before pods form
8 February 2018
Now is the time to destroy any missed moth plant vines, while they are still clearly visible and flowering, and before pods form or mature. Moth plant is a South American vine; invasive in New...
Moth plant: act now before pods form
8 February 2018

Now is the time to destroy any missed moth plant vines, while they are still clearly visible and flowering, and before pods form or mature.

Moth plant is a South American vine; invasive in New Zealand and unfortunately well-established in Northland, Auckland, Waikato and the coastal Bay of Plenty where it can heavily infest orchard shelter belts. The large seed pods open over winter months to release hundreds of wind-blown seeds.

The simplest and most effective control method is to use a sharp spade and chip the vines out of the ground.  Mature moth plant vines are not easy to kill with herbicide: cut the vine to within 20cm of ground level and apply one part glyphosate to five parts water, plus a sticker such as Pulse, to the vine base.

Moth plant harbours passion vine hopper, slows down orchard shelter trimmers and is a poisonous plant.  The sap can cause severe dermatitis, so wear gloves, protective clothing and consider eye protection.

Grower News
8 February 2018
Support our talented young horticulturalists
8 February 2018
Head along to the Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition at the Te Puke A&P Show this weekend and support the young horticulturalists vying for the title. The six competitors –...
Support our talented young horticulturalists
8 February 2018

Head along to the Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition at the Te Puke A&P Show this weekend and support the young horticulturalists vying for the title.

The six competitors – known for their passion for the industry and exciting futures – will battle it out in a series of theoretical and practical horticultural activities during the full day event, including a biosecurity round run by KVH. The competition culminates with a speech contest at the gala dinner and awards ceremony the following Thursday night.

Learn more about the competitors here.

KVH will also be at the A&P Show to answer any questions you may have about the work we’re doing to keep unwanted pests and diseases from establishing within our kiwifruit orchards and communities. 

Biosecurity News
8 February 2018
Managing imports and the BMSB threat
8 February 2018
KVH has put forward a submission to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on proposed amendments to the import standard for ‘vehicles, machinery and equipment’. Although there are...
Managing imports and the BMSB threat
8 February 2018

KVH has put forward a submission to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on proposed amendments to the import standard for ‘vehicles, machinery and equipment’.

Although there are multiple potential ways BMSB could enter New Zealand, interception data demonstrates that the ‘vehicles, machinery and equipment’ pathway is high-risk. This is especially the case from countries where BMSB is found in large numbers, undergoing population growth, or expansion across regions – for example in the USA, Italy, and several other countries across Europe.

MPI have done a good job by introducing new measures on this pathway to provide greater biosecurity protection for New Zealand and KVH fully supports this. Our submission provided additional feedback to strengthen proposed measures and reduce the risk of BMSB establishing.

The main points our submission to MPI specifically covered were:

-        the need to carefully manage, and be able to regularly amend, the countries to which BMSB treatments apply;

-        the importance of clear and practical regulations around the application of heat/fumigation treatments, and storage and transport of consignments before export to New Zealand,

-         treatment verification and follow-up in the event of failure.

Growers will be kept up-to-date with further KVH involvement in the consultation process. 

 

Biosecurity News
8 February 2018
From the frontline
8 February 2018
The summer rush is on and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has been handling a substantial volume of passengers at our airports.  Numbers at Auckland have been up 5% on last year, and...
From the frontline
8 February 2018

The summer rush is on and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has been handling a substantial volume of passengers at our airports.  Numbers at Auckland have been up 5% on last year, and more than 18,000 travellers were processed on the airports busiest day.

Statistics for December alone: 

·         692,088 air passengers processed

·         1,412 infringement notices issued

·         3,008 mail items opened and inspected

·         1,233 loaded containers inspected

Some weird and wonderful interceptions of interest from our borders over the period include: 

·         A Belgian air passenger was forced to leave New Zealand after attempting to smuggle three sausages (spotted by an x-ray operator) into Auckland in a backpack.

·         A 16kg box of abandoned apples found at Wellington airport. MPI officials inspected them and thankfully there were no signs of fruit fly found.

·         An ornamental reindeer made of dried vines was part of the Christmas decorations on a private jet from China. Because the plane was headed for other domestic airports the reindeer couldn’t travel any further and had to be destroyed.

·         A Western Conifer Seed Bug (from the same family as Brown Marmorated Stink Bug) was found in an imported vehicle. The bug has an appetite for fir trees and is a nuisance in homes over winter.

·         Taika Waititi and Hilary Swank were in New Zealand over the summer and he took the opportunity to remind social media followers of the apple incident of 2005, when MPI fined the actress for not declaring an apple.  The post certainly had people thinking about New Zealand’s biosecurity rules as it built up more than 60,000 likes.

MPI produce a regular newsletter about what’s being done at the border to keep unwanted pests and diseases at bay. It also includes interesting data and you can subscribe here.

 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz