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Biosecurity News
24 January 2019
Myrtle rust risk still high
24 January 2019
Remember to check myrtle rust plants this summer to help track the spread of the disease. Myrtle rust is likely to be more active during warmer weather and is likely to spread to new areas where it...
Myrtle rust risk still high
24 January 2019

Remember to check myrtle rust plants this summer to help track the spread of the disease. Myrtle rust is likely to be more active during warmer weather and is likely to spread to new areas where it hasn't been seen before.

New Zealand's precious native myrtle plants including pōhutukawa, rātā, mānuka, kānuka and ramarama are vulnerable to the disease. The fungus, which is mainly spread by wind, generally infects shoots, buds, and young leaves of myrtle plants. Infected plants show typical symptoms including bright yellow powdery spots on the underside of leaves.

If you think you see symptoms of myrtle rust remember to not touch the plant or collect samples but take pictures and report it to Biosecurity New Zealand on 0800 80 99 66.

As of December 2018, the disease has been confirmed on more than 800 properties across most of the North Island and upper areas of the South Island. The Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, and Auckland are the most seriously affected areas.

Biosecurity New Zealand and the Department of Conservation (DOC) are currently working in partnership to identify ways to best manage the disease and support the health of our myrtles in the future. In the meantime, it is important to understand where the rust has spread to, what plants it is affecting (especially new ones) and where it is active.

A map of areas where myrtle rust has been found in New Zealand and resources on what to look for, what to do if you find myrtle rust and how to manage it are available on the Biosecurity New Zealand website.

Biosecurity News
24 January 2019
Promoting biosecurity across the Bay of Plenty
24 January 2019
Two videos have ben produced by the Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) team, to raise awareness as to how forest users can help keep kauri dieback from entering the forests of the Bay of...
Promoting biosecurity across the Bay of Plenty
24 January 2019

Two videos have ben produced by the Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) team, to raise awareness as to how forest users can help keep kauri dieback from entering the forests of the Bay of Plenty.

The videos are around a minute long and include dramatic and majestic visuals of kauri and the way people can protect this national treasure. Local talent, including mana whenua, talk about the desired biosecurity behaviours we want to see from everyone - “scrub, spray, stay” (clean off footwear, use disinfectant, stay on track). All Black Joe Webber and his son Kian Webber are featuring in one of the videos – they were strongly supportive of the biosecurity kauri dieback kaupapa and keen to get involved.

This messaging is in line with the national kauri dieback programme and Ko Tatou This Is Us, encouraging everyone to play a part in protecting the things we hold near and dear, and being an active member of the 4.7 million biosecurity team.

KVH, and other TMBC partners are sharing the videos on websites and social media channels, and if you’re at any Bay of Plenty movie theatres you may also see one of the videos pop up as part of the pre-show advertising.

Biosecurity News
8 January 2019
BMSB
8 January 2019
Single BMSB detections A single male Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) was found inside a Mt Maunganui house in mid-December, 2018. The area where it was found has been inspected and traps were set...
BMSB
8 January 2019

Single BMSB detections

A single male Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) was found inside a Mt Maunganui house in mid-December, 2018. The area where it was found has been inspected and traps were set prior to Christmas. The traps have been checked multiple times over the holiday period and no further BMSB have been found in the area.

A single BMSB has also been found in Glenfield, Auckland in early January. It’s not known where the stink bug came from and Biosecurity New Zealand inquiries are continuing to try to determine a pathway. The area has been inspected and traps are being set to determine whether this was a single hitchhiker. To date there is no evidence of an established BMSB population, or that this detection is related to the detection in Mount Maunganui. The New Zealand summer is the peak season for BMSB interceptions in New Zealand and we continue to see a high number of interceptions at our border from Northern Hemisphere countries.

Please keep a lookout for any BMSB. If you think you’ve seen this insect, catch it and call the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on 0800 80 99 66. 

21 December 2018
MPI and KVH are working together with other horticulture groups to investigate a detection of a single BMSB that has been discovered in the Mount Maunganui area.

The bug was found earlier this week, caught and reported to the MPI hotline. The identification of a single BMSB has caused concern, but KVH stresses that this does not necessarily mean that other bugs will be found.

MPI immediately started investigating and surveillance is being carried out at the property and in the surrounding area as part of our investigation to confirm there are no more of the bugs present. At this point in time we have found only the one, male bug.

KVH is part of the BMSB Council, a group convened under the Government Industry Agreement for Biosecurity Readiness and Response. Over the last two years, the Council has been developing readiness plans in preparation for a potential incursion, and, together with MPI, has initiated the investigation.

BMSB represents a significant risk to New Zealand’s native environment, but a detection of a single bug does not mean that there is an established population. Rather it means we are working to ensure that this does not develop into an incursion.

We occasionally intercept live and dead specimens of BMSB. We can’t be sure how this bug arrived in New Zealand and it may not be possible to do so we’re asking for growers and the public to help us and keep a lookout.

BMSB is a shield shaped insect about the size of a ten-cent piece with distinctive black and white banding on the abdomen and the antennae.  If you think you have detected a suspect BMSB catch it; snap it; report it – call the MPI hotline on 0800 80 99 66.

For further information see the MPI press release or contact KVH at info@kvh.org.nz or:

·         Visit the BMSB page on the KVH website for more information

·         Look at the BMSB fact sheet for images and information about how to identify BMSB

·         Watch a short video about the damage BMSB can do

·         Read the latest (November) update from KVH about recent detections at the border and work being done to manage the risk posed by BMSB

KVH will keep growers updated as the investigation continues. 

Grower News
13 December 2018
Hill Laboratories Christmas hours
13 December 2018
With the upcoming Christmas holiday period, there is only a day left for samples to arrive at Hills - the last day is tomorrow, Friday 14 December 2018. Testing will resume on Monday 7 January...
Hill Laboratories Christmas hours
13 December 2018



With the upcoming Christmas holiday period, there is only a day left for samples to arrive at Hills - the last day is tomorrow, Friday 14 December 2018. Testing will resume on Monday 7 January 2019.

Only KVH pre-arranged testing will be accepted between these dates. Please contact Karyn Lowry on 027 227 1157 if urgent Psa testing is required between 14 December and 7 January. Photos of symptoms will be required. We anticipate these will only be from areas currently free of Psa (i.e. the South Island).

Company Notices
13 December 2018
Merry Christmas from KVH
13 December 2018
The KVH office will be closed from midday on Friday 21 December 2018 and will reopen at 8.30am on Monday 7 January 2019. If any urgent issues arise during this period, please contact Chief Executive...
Merry Christmas from KVH
13 December 2018

The KVH office will be closed from midday on Friday 21 December 2018 and will reopen at 8.30am on Monday 7 January 2019. If any urgent issues arise during this period, please contact Chief Executive Stu Hutchings on 0274 787 901.

 

Also, Hill Laboratories have limited hours for testing over the Christmas period. Read the note in this Bulletin for more information about exact dates.

Biosecurity News
13 December 2018
KiwiNet training builds industry preparedness
13 December 2018
Last week KVH facilitated it’s twice-annual KiwiNet workshop, with around 40 participants from across the kiwifruit industry attending the day’s presentations. The workshop was run...
KiwiNet training builds industry preparedness
13 December 2018

Last week KVH facilitated it’s twice-annual KiwiNet workshop, with around 40 participants from across the kiwifruit industry attending the day’s presentations.

The workshop was run with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and focussed on increasing understanding of how biosecurity responses are run. The day started with a rundown of recent MPI responses and the national biosecurity network, showcased with first-hand fruit fly stories and images from incursions over recent years.


MPI’s guest presenters Andrew Sander and Gabrielle Duggan then introduced the framework used by the Ministry (and other agencies such as Civil Defence and NZ Police) when initiating a response to a biosecurity incursion. The Coordinated Incident Management System, or CIMS as it is commonly known, is a framework of team structures, functions, processes, and terminology that is applied to biosecurity/emergency responses.



During the session, KiwiNet members split into groups and used the CIMS model to manage simulated responses to a fake Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) incursion on a vineyard, near several other orchards, in a small urban area. Group members learnt how teams are put together in a response, how they work together day-to-day and what the specific roles and responsibilities of different teams are. Groups also had to work through the differences between being on-site in a response versus assisting MPI in Wellington’s head office.

From here, KiwiNet members and KVH will work with MPI on further response training opportunities.

KiwiNet is a network of people selected from across the kiwifruit industry who champion biosecurity readiness and coordinate the deployment of industry resources into biosecurity responses. You can read more about the work of the network here or in the Kiwifruit Journal.

Biosecurity News
13 December 2018
KVH sponsors award winner
13 December 2018
KVH has sponsored one of the prizes in biosecurity for the Year 4 BioSci 751 class at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland. The aim of this prize is to encourage students to...
KVH sponsors award winner
13 December 2018

KVH has sponsored one of the prizes in biosecurity for the Year 4 BioSci 751 class at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland.

The aim of this prize is to encourage students to take up post graduate research in biosecurity related projects.



The prize was awarded to Rebecca Gough (in the middle in the image above) by Professor Jo Putterill, Director of the School of Biological Sciences Plant and Food Joint Graduate School.

Biosecurity News
13 December 2018
Heat on for Japanese vehicles
13 December 2018
Over recent weeks officials and industry have completed putting in systems in place to allow offshore treatment of used Japanese vehicles and machinery before it heads to New Zealand. The treatment...
Heat on for Japanese vehicles
13 December 2018

Over recent weeks officials and industry have completed putting in systems in place to allow offshore treatment of used Japanese vehicles and machinery before it heads to New Zealand. The treatment is a requirement under new rules to keep Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) from hitchhiking to New Zealand. They follow a spate of detections on car carriers arriving from Japan earlier this year.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) says all three approved inspection operations in Japan have constructed heat treatment chambers at their various yards. The facilities vary in nature, but all have demonstrated they can reach the MPI-approved treatment rate and have appropriate temperature recording systems if records are requested for any treated vehicle. Each of the system operators has had to undergo a rigorous approval process, involving physical inspection and verification by MPI officers in Japan.

There have also been developments with how the biosecurity risk of new vehicles and machinery from Japan is reduced. MPI recently had staff there for six weeks assessing and approving supply chain processes designed by manufacturers to avoid the need for offshore treatment. These processes involve having strict controls in place to reduce the risk of contamination during manufacturing, storage and transport.

All new vehicles and machinery manufacturers now have MPI approved processes in place. This approval can be revoked, which would force the manufacturer in question to treat their product in the same manner as used vehicles.

Biosecurity News
13 December 2018
Trials at the border improve biosecurity
13 December 2018
There are several projects underway at Auckland Airport aimed at raising awareness and improving biosecurity behaviour, including: New x-ray screening technology: an x-ray unit will be trialled...
Trials at the border improve biosecurity
13 December 2018

There are several projects underway at Auckland Airport aimed at raising awareness and improving biosecurity behaviour, including:

New x-ray screening technology: an x-ray unit will be trialled later this month that uses new technology to screen luggage before arriving passengers pick up their bags.  The idea is to identify risk items and bags of interest before passengers reach biosecurity lanes, so quarantine officers have the information they need before they interact with passengers, allowing them to make better risk assessment decisions. The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) are developing software that will allow the technology to automatically detect risk goods such as stink bugs.

First encounters: quarantine officers have started meeting flights from known stink bug hot spots like Chile to hand out fliers and ensure passengers know to ring the pest and disease hotline if they find any bugs in their luggage. MPI had 20 calls about suspected sightings in October from passengers who said they saw information about stink bugs at the airport.

Clearing huge hauls of food: there’s a project underway to test a new way of clearing air passengers who arrive with large volumes of imported food. Quarantine officers spend an inordinate amount of time inspecting these parcels so MPI, NZ Customs, Auckland Airport and airline representatives are working on a trial that will divert some imported food during peak times, allowing inspection during quieter periods. It may mean passengers have to return to the airport to pick up their food, but it allows for much more considered inspection of risk goods.

Biosecurity News
13 December 2018
Do not unpack a pest during the holidays
13 December 2018
The holidays are upon us and with them come extra biosecurity risks posed by unpacking Christmas goodies and luggage. Remember, and be sure to remind family and friends, to carefully unpack and...
Do not unpack a pest during the holidays
13 December 2018

The holidays are upon us and with them come extra biosecurity risks posed by unpacking Christmas goodies and luggage.

Remember, and be sure to remind family and friends, to carefully unpack and check any packages or bags from overseas for hitchhiking pests like Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). It was only a couple of weekends ago that
26 of the bugs were discovered in a box of imported shoes, bought by an eBay customer in Oamaru – proving how real the threat is.

Open overseas parcels in a closed room and if you find anything unusual, catch it, photograph it, and report it.  Watch and share the short video below about checking parcels for unwanted visitors.




Kiwifruit growers and other passengers associated with primary sectors travelling overseas over the Christmas and New Year period may find they experience more interventions when returning to New Zealand. This is because they potentially pose a greater biosecurity risk based on the likelihood they may have visited offshore orchards and farms during their travels. KVH has put together a useful fact sheet outlining what kiwifruit growers can do to help reduce biosecurity risk and what they can expect through border control when returning home.

Biosecurity News
13 December 2018
Make the most of the Psa Risk Model
13 December 2018
A reminder to keep watching the Psa Risk Model as pockets of moderate and high-risk weather continue for many regions. Once day/night temperatures average 20 oC or higher, for periods of a week or...
Make the most of the Psa Risk Model
13 December 2018

A reminder to keep watching the Psa Risk Model as pockets of moderate and high-risk weather continue for many regions. Once day/night temperatures average 20 oC or higher, for periods of a week or more, Psa infection risk falls away but, in the meantime, growers should use the model to assist with planning spray and orchard activities.

Psa Risk Model graph showing upcoming risk based on data from the Katikati weather station

Additional features have recently been added to the model display to help interpretation, including a Graphs Guide (in the list to the right of the options box) that covers the basics of graph features and plots to assist users. A Wet Hours column has also been added to the data table to help provide some insight into the possible reason for days with low-risk (R index).

Please note that we have been advised access to the Waihi weather station has been temporarily disabled while data access issues are improved. We apologise for this inconvenience which we hope will be resolved in the New Year.

Biosecurity News
13 December 2018
Care when applying copper sprays after fruit set
13 December 2018
Psa leaf spots, and cankers which have been active through spring, continue to be potential Psa inoculum sources within the orchard. It is important growers consider their individual site risk and if...
Care when applying copper sprays after fruit set
13 December 2018

Psa leaf spots, and cankers which have been active through spring, continue to be potential Psa inoculum sources within the orchard. It is important growers consider their individual site risk and if risk is high, continue to apply copper at summer rates after fruit set. Ideally apply copper following canopy work such as male pruning rounds. Similarly, extra care with tool hygiene should be observed.

When applying coppers, for crop safety, maintain a five to seven-day gap between copper and foliar sprays, and do not apply sprays in poor drying conditions or high humidity. Check the pH of the spray mix and use buffers to adjust this as necessary. For example, Kocide Opti should not be applied at less than pH 6.5 as this may lead to fruit marking. Apply products on their own, rather than tank mixed with other products as this further reduces risk of leaf or fruit damage.

Take care with the timing of copper sprays applied after fruit set. The recommendation is to avoid spraying through skin sensitive periods.  For Gold, skin sensitivity commences around 21 days after fruit set. The risk of fruit marking becomes higher between 28 and 42 days after fruit set, then risk lessens but still continues from 42 until 80 days after fruit set. For Hayward, 14 to 35 days after fruit set is considered a high-risk period. To avoid mistakes, note fruit set dates and safe spray periods on your calendar as an easy reference.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz