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Biosecurity News
5 September 2019
Sharing learnings with Australia
5 September 2019
Last month KVH attended the Plant Biosecurity Research Symposium in Brisbane, an inaugural event to share plant biosecurity research between trans-Tasman counterparts so that we can avoid duplicating...
Sharing learnings with Australia
5 September 2019

Last month KVH attended the Plant Biosecurity Research Symposium in Brisbane, an inaugural event to share plant biosecurity research between trans-Tasman counterparts so that we can avoid duplicating efforts and identify areas for future collaboration.

KVH presented on lessons from Psa and learnings for biosecurity readiness, and it was interesting to see several consistent themes come through in the presentations. Of interest was a presentation by Shane Templeton, from Templeton ginger who described his experience in dealing with a soil borne pathogen, Pythium rot (a close relative to Phytophthora).

Shane described how it took several years to report and take action to the unusual symptoms being observed on his property by which stage the pathogen had taken hold and about 30% of production was being lost. Through strict on-orchard biosecurity practices Shane managed to eventually get on top of the disease but it almost cost him the business, which is the largest fresh ginger operation in Australia and a business that has been in the family for three generations. Messages that are very relevant to the
on-orchard biosecurity guidelines that KVH released recently.

The need for investment in smarter tools and technology was also made clear in the opening address by Lyn O’Connell, Deputy Secretary of the Australian Department of Agriculture. Lyn provided an insight into how biosecurity risk is increasing with an ever more connected world. In Australia, it is expected that by 2025 volumes of cargo, containers, and passengers will each increase by over 70% from their current value. This increase in trade volumes, combined with an increase in the rate of pests spreading means that investment in biosecurity systems would need to triple just to maintain the current level of risk. A trend that is clearly not sustainable and therefore there is a growing need for science to deliver smarter approaches to managing risk, which was a key theme of the conference.

Biosecurity News
5 September 2019
Fruitfed supporting biosecurity awareness
5 September 2019
This week KVH was invited to the Fruitfed Supplies (part of PGG Wrightson) kiwifruit and subtropical Crop Sector Group technical update to share updates on kiwifruit industry biosecurity threats and...
Fruitfed supporting biosecurity awareness
5 September 2019

This week KVH was invited to the Fruitfed Supplies (part of PGG Wrightson) kiwifruit and subtropical Crop Sector Group technical update to share updates on kiwifruit industry biosecurity threats and readiness efforts.

The annual conference provides staff supporting kiwifruit, avocado, citrus, blueberries, passionfruit, tamarillo and feijoa growers a chance to upskill knowledge, in keeping with the PGG Wrightson drive to “help grow the country”. With biosecurity threats ranked the number one risk to primary sector businesses for the ninth consecutive year by KPMG’s AgriBusiness Agenda survey it was fitting that biosecurity was part of this year’s programme.

Erin Lane, KVH’s Biosecurity Analyst, flagged increased Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) pressure in Europe this year with impacts on Italian pears described as “even more negative than any ominous initial forecast”. Reports suggest many crops will not be harvested due to BMSB damage levels. To help manage this risk to New Zealand, new rules for this stink bug season require offshore treatment of imported vehicles, machinery, and parts from 33 identified risk countries, and all sea containers from Italy.

The complexity of the ongoing fruit fly response in Auckland, development of the updated Kiwifruit’s Most Unwanted list, and readiness planning underway for invasive Phytophthora species were identified as onshore challenges on the KVH biosecurity radar.

The value and importance of the role horticultural technical advisers can play in raising awareness of biosecurity risks through their networks was emphasised and the recently released on-orchard guidelines, which help kiwifruit growers build their own biosecurity plan, were presented as a tool to support these conversations.

KVH also took the opportunity to thank Fruitfed Supplies for being a valued member of KiwiNet, the team of industry people who champion biosecurity readiness with a goal of reducing impacts if and when the kiwifruit industry is faced with a new biosecurity incursion.

Image: Fruitfed Supplies staff visiting a large glasshouse operation during their annual conference, to look at things outside the square. Image credit: Fruitfed Supplies.

Biosecurity News
5 September 2019
In the news
5 September 2019
Preparing for the war on stink bugs: Georgie has a particularly unpleasant but important job. She’s trained to sniff out Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB), which are said to smell a bit like...
In the news
5 September 2019

Preparing for the war on stink bugs: Georgie has a particularly unpleasant but important job. She’s trained to sniff out Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB), which are said to smell a bit like sweaty socks.

She’s just one of New Zealand’s tools in an incursion toolbox which includes sniffer dogs, traps, lures, heat treatment, sprays, wasps – and a motivated public ready to catch and photograph suspicious bugs.

We expect a ten-year low in Italian pear production: The pear campaign in the important cultivation areas of Italy started a few weeks ago with the harvest of the first early varieties. But the signals of this year's campaign are anything but positive: the estimates of the yield decline had to be corrected by -30%, or in some areas -50%. One of the main reasons is the infestation of the trees by BMSB. 

Grower News
5 September 2019
Biosecurity buzz at roadshows
5 September 2019
KVH took part in the recent Zespri Grower Roadshows, meeting and speaking with growers about new developments and recent biosecurity activity we’ve been undertaking. Chief Executive Stu...
Biosecurity buzz at roadshows
5 September 2019

KVH took part in the recent Zespri Grower Roadshows, meeting and speaking with growers about new developments and recent biosecurity activity we’ve been undertaking.

Chief Executive Stu Hutchings and Biosecurity Manager Matt Dyck presented at the roadshows on the ongoing Auckland fruit fly response (and the kiwifruit industry’s contribution in terms of cost-share and people), provided a short Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) update, and introduced the new kiwifruit growers on-orchard guidelines.

Heading into the high-risk season for BMSB and fruit flies they also shared with growers the new Kiwifruit’s Most Unwanted posters and flyers, which highlight why each pest on the list is such a big threat and the impacts they could each have.

Biosecurity News
5 September 2019
Managing BMSB risk this summer
5 September 2019
With September comes the start of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) season. KVH continues to advocate strongly on behalf of industry for strict controls that will make it harder for the BMSB to...
Managing BMSB risk this summer
5 September 2019

With September comes the start of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) season.

KVH continues to advocate strongly on behalf of industry for strict controls that will make it harder for the BMSB to get here, and for information and awareness campaigns that encourage people to be on the lookout for this harmful pest and report any suspected sightings.

Biosecurity New Zealand's new rules for this stink bug season require offshore treatment of imported vehicles, machinery, and parts from 33 identified risk countries, and all sea containers from Italy. In the past, only uncontainerised vehicle cargo from risk countries required treatment before arriving in New Zealand. Biosecurity New Zealand is working with the Australian Department of Agriculture to finalise a list of approved offshore treatment providers for this season. The process requires all facilities previously registered with Biosecurity New Zealand to reapply for joint recognition by both countries.

Earlier this year, Biosecurity New Zealand announced a plan to work with Australia to have staff based in Europe to undertake auditing of facilities and to provide education and advice as needed. Two New Zealand officers are going to spend the next three weeks checking out offshore treatment providers in Europe. They will be visiting some of the biggest providers in Italy, Spain and France, and major export ports in Belgium and Germany.

Similar to previous years, this season will also see increased surveillance and inspection of arriving vessels and cargo from countries with established stink bug populations.

Biosecurity News
5 September 2019
Providing input into smarter science for New Zealand biosecurity
5 September 2019
New Zealand faces increasing pressure on our biosecurity systems and needs science to deliver smarter approaches for managing risk. New Zealand’s Biological Heritage National Science Challenge...
Providing input into smarter science for New Zealand biosecurity
5 September 2019

New Zealand faces increasing pressure on our biosecurity systems and needs science to deliver smarter approaches for managing risk. New Zealand’s Biological Heritage National Science Challenge is a major initiative that is seeking to deliver science solutions for biodiversity and biosecurity.

The Challenge is based around seven strategic outcomes for which a co-design process is currently being undertaken with stakeholders to guide research priorities, through a series of workshops.

KVH is well represented in this process providing stakeholder input into three of these Strategic Outcomes; emerging risks, border tools and technologies, and post-border tools and technologies.

Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Kiwifruit's Most Unwanted updated and out now
22 August 2019
KVH regularly talks about fruit fly being our number one threat closely followed by the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), but how are these rankings assigned? We’ve developed a risk matrix...
Kiwifruit's Most Unwanted updated and out now
22 August 2019

KVH regularly talks about fruit fly being our number one threat closely followed by the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), but how are these rankings assigned?

We’ve developed a risk matrix to provide a structured and objective method of prioritising threat organisms into a shorter list for the purpose of readiness and response planning.

The organisms that are considered the highest risk make up Kiwifruit's Most Unwanted. This is based on the likelihood of them entering and establishing in New Zealand, and the potential production and market access impacts should this occur.

Significant efforts are put into readiness planning for these threats. This essentially involves working with others in our industry, Biosecurity New Zealand and affected sectors to agree how we would respond to an incursion of these organisms and running simulations with KiwiNet (our industry response team) to test these readiness plans.

The Most Unwanted list has just been updated and many of the pests and pathogens that feature will look familiar as you would have seen them in the headlines in recent times – BMSB was found in December at a property in Mount Maunganui and there have been three separate fruit fly responses in Auckland this year.

However, there have also been some changes to the list, namely the addition of the Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) which is becoming an increasing threat globally since its invasion into the USA in 2014. Kiwifruit is a host to this pest and there have been reports of damage to kiwifruit in both its native and invasive range with sooty mould growth being the most significant impact. SLF is a hitchhiker pest that would be most likely to arrive as egg masses on inanimate objects. Researchers in the USA say this pest may be just as devastating if not worse than BMSB.

You can order a copy of the Kiwifruit's Most Unwanted updated foldout flyer or brand new poster (we have them in A4 and A3) for your orchard, business, or staffroom by contacting KVH.

Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Psa symptoms herald spring season change
22 August 2019
KVH has to date received two reports of Psa exudate symptoms, one for a previously undetected orchard and the other for a young Gold3 block. Early varieties are now beginning to break bud and...
Psa symptoms herald spring season change
22 August 2019

KVH has to date received two reports of Psa exudate symptoms, one for a previously undetected orchard and the other for a young Gold3 block. Early varieties are now beginning to break bud and growers are recommended to begin monitoring areas more prone to Psa, to build an understanding of where risk may lie this season. Focus on more vulnerable young plants and take care to protect these with directed spray programmes and good frost protection.

If ground conditions have limited the opportunity to apply sprays through winter, now is the time to apply copper at winter rates, ensuring a one-week window is maintained between bud enhancing spays and copper. Research has shown Psa can be present under bud scales as well as on the surface of buds so protection through the bud-break period is key to providing a strong start to the spring programme.

Where pruning gangs are still at work an emphasis on tool hygiene is also recommended.

If Psa-like symptoms are seen for the first time on your orchard report these to KVH on 0800 665 825. Growers can also contact their packhouse technical representative for advice and sample collection if required.

Hill Laboratories carry out routine Psa testing weekly on Wednesdays.

Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Distant experts fight bug threat
22 August 2019
Two scientists on opposite sides of the world are at the forefront of the battle to keep some of the most insidious, damaging pests at bay from valuable food crops. This summer in northern Italy they...
Distant experts fight bug threat
22 August 2019

Two scientists on opposite sides of the world are at the forefront of the battle to keep some of the most insidious, damaging pests at bay from valuable food crops. This summer in northern Italy they are working closely in an effort to try to stymie the spread of the voracious Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) there and keep it out of New Zealand entirely.

Professors Claudio Ioriatti of Foundazione Edmund Mach and Max Suckling of New Zealand’s Plant and Food Research and University of Auckland spoke to
Farmers Weekly last week about their battle with bugs across the hemispheres:

Standing in an orchard in the warm north Italian sunshine Professor Max Suckling casts a rueful eye towards the mountains surrounding the Trento district.

“I am sure those hills are crawling with them,” he observes, referring to the BMSB flitting and crawling across the ripening apples next to him.

The stink bug has already almost wiped out Italy’s €300 million pear industry and now threatens Trento’s 10,000 hectares of apple crops. Its impact in NZ would devastate the horticultural sector and significantly increase the amount of sprays used on remaining fruit, losing NZ fruit’s premium as a low-residue fruit supplier.


Read more here.

Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Virginian apple grower experience of BMSB
22 August 2019
Last week KVH travelled to the Hawkes Bay to join a workshop hosted by New Zealand Apples & Pears which focused on mid to long-term management of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). Bill...
Virginian apple grower experience of BMSB
22 August 2019

Last week KVH travelled to the Hawkes Bay to join a workshop hosted by New Zealand Apples & Pears which focused on mid to long-term management of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

Bill Mackintosh, who was also a speaker at the Apples & Pears annual conference this year, set the scene sharing first-hand experience of the damage, control and secondary pest problems associated with BMSB in his home region of West Virginia.

Bill grows apples, pears and peaches and commented that trapping and control methods are continually improving, with growers benefiting from United States Department of Agriculture research into control methods.

Most growers now reduce damage through application of border sprays four to five times a year, although in years where BMSB levels are high, growers may still repeatedly spray whole orchards. Residue profiles for fruit sprayed to protect against BMSB are a real challenge as treated fruit loses access to premium markets (which demand residue free fruit). The rise in pests previously controlled through well-developed integrated fruit production programmes has also impacted grower returns and viability. Populations of western flower thrips, woolly aphids and St Jose scale, have all bounced back since pyrethroids have been applied.

Bill emphasised the importance of early detection and prompted all growers and field staff to be on constant watch for all life stages of BMSB, and to pay close attention to any unusual crop damage. He recalls poor storage quality was reported for local apple crops in the years leading up to the 2010 BMSB population explosion, and in hindsight believes that internal damage, diagnosed then as calcium deficiency, may well have been early sightings of BMSB damage. Small droplets on the skin of developing fruit, with no apparent cause were also a clue sometimes picked up by the keen eye.

Biosecurity News
22 August 2019
Phytophthora planning underway
22 August 2019
Last week a one-day symposium on Phytophthora was held in Auckland as part of the New Zealand Plant Protection Society (NZPPS) Conference. Phytophthora has had a lot of attention recently as it...
Phytophthora planning underway
22 August 2019

Last week a one-day symposium on Phytophthora was held in Auckland as part of the New Zealand Plant Protection Society (NZPPS) Conference.

Phytophthora has had a lot of attention recently as it continues to spread globally and cause devastation to a range of cultivated and natural environments. Notable species in New Zealand include Phytophthora agathidicida which causes Kauri Dieback, P. pluvialis which is causing Red Needle Cast in pine, and P. cinnamomi which is causing problems for Avocados.

The symposium drew on a broad range of speakers, both locally and internationally, bringing a unique global perspective. Matt Dyck from KVH and Dr. Sonia Whiteman from Zespri presented on the risk of Invasive Phytophthora to kiwifruit.  They covered the recent literature review commissioned to better understand that risk, as well as the importance of learning more about which species could potentially impact us here in New Zealand. They also noted the preparation underway through our readiness and response plan which is currently being developed in conjunction with Biosecurity New Zealand.

Company Notices
22 August 2019
Help spread the biosecurity word online
22 August 2019
You, your family and friends can follow KVH on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube social media pages. We use the pages to engage with more people across the wider kiwifruit industry and share...
Help spread the biosecurity word online
22 August 2019

You, your family and friends can follow KVH on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube social media pages.

We use the pages to engage with more people across the wider kiwifruit industry and share biosecurity messages with the public. It’s important to us that everyone is involved in biosecurity and sees that they have a part to play in helping keep out unwanted pests and threats.

Being online also enables us to spread messages more efficiently and quickly when we need to let people know about new incursions, any effects they may or may not have on the kiwifruit industry), and what actions people may need to take. You can follow us on Twitter ‘@KVHNZ’ or find us on Facebook and YouTube at ‘Kiwifruit Vine Health – KVH’.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz