Search Site

Newsroom

Print these articles
Biosecurity News
23 August 2018
New seasonal management guide out now
23 August 2018
The Psa-V Seasonal Management Wall Chart 2018-19 is out now and available to view or download from the KVH website. A printed A2 sized copy of the chart will also be delivered to growers in the next...
New seasonal management guide out now
23 August 2018
The Psa-V Seasonal Management Wall Chart 2018-19 is out now and available to view or download from the KVH website. A printed A2 sized copy of the chart will also be delivered to growers in the next Kiwiflier, out early September.

A key feature of the wall chart is the KVH Recommended Product List, which sets out the upcoming seasons approved products for protection against Psa, their year-round application rates and permitted use periods.

Key changes to this season’s wall chart are:

·        Additional descriptive information about the size and length of leaves and shoots when applying products.

·        More emphasis on cultural management of Psa, including making information about products for sanitising tools and pruning more promintent.

Any changes or updates made to the chart and product list during the 2018/19 season will be made to the online versions and will be notified via the KVH Bulletin.

Biosecurity News
23 August 2018
Video guide to the Psa Risk Model
23 August 2018
Complementing the Psa-V Seasonal Management Wall Chart is the KVH Psa Risk Model. Developed as an online, weather-based decision support system, the model helps growers with orchard management in a...
Video guide to the Psa Risk Model
23 August 2018

Complementing the Psa-V Seasonal Management Wall Chart is the KVH Psa Risk Model. Developed as an online, weather-based decision support system, the model helps growers with orchard management in a Psa environment. It includes weather station data and forecast details to provide customised access to unique disease information and interpretiations.

KVH has produced an online video tutorial to guide growers through the model, demonstrating how to use the weather tools available.  View the tutorial here and access the model here. Please note, growers must be registered with the KVH website to use the model – if you haven’t already done so, please register now.

For quick and easy access to the model:
•    We recommend using the Firefox or Google Chrome browsers, as Internet Explorer does not support the software used.
•    When you log in using your email address and password, tick the ‘remember me’ box so that your computer remembers your details and you won’t have to enter them each time.
•    If internet speed is an issue for you, setting a shorter time in the model will help the download pace.
•    If you have any queries please contact KVH on 0800 665 825 or email us. We’re happy to help. 

Biosecurity News
23 August 2018
Spot the difference.....
23 August 2018
Do you watch Border Patrol? If you do, did you ‘catch’ the new addition to the title screen? You’d have to be quick, they were off screen in a ‘snap’ but the team at the...
Spot the difference.....
23 August 2018

Do you watch Border Patrol? If you do, did you ‘catch’ the new addition to the title screen? You’d have to be quick, they were off screen in a ‘snap’ but the team at the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) ‘report’ they worked with the shows production company to add the unwanted extras for this season to help raise awareness of priority items our border patrol agencies are looking out for.

 

Biosecurity News
23 August 2018
Full label claim for Kasumin
23 August 2018
Kasumin has now gained a full ACVM registration label claim for Psa management.  Kasumin is included on the KVH recommended product list and works as a preventative bactericide. The active...
Full label claim for Kasumin
23 August 2018

Kasumin has now gained a full ACVM registration label claim for Psa management.  Kasumin is included on the KVH recommended product list and works as a preventative bactericide. The active ingredient kasugamycin has a bactericidal mode of action that is different from other bactericides such as streptomycin. Kasugamycin is active against pathogenic fungi and bacteria in plants and has never been employed as a human or veterinary medicine.

Kasumin must be used in a programme with other plant protection products that are active on and recommended for the management of Psa and should be reserved for use in high-risk situations. One pre-flower Kasumin is allowed under Crop Protection Standard rules, with a second application requiring a JA (Justified Approval). Follow user guides.

Biosecurity News
23 August 2018
Learnings from BMSB research underway
23 August 2018
Watch a hot off the press video from Italy to get an insight into the work being undertaken to study and learn about the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). Professor Max Suckling from Plant and Food...
Learnings from BMSB research underway
23 August 2018

Watch a hot off the press video from Italy to get an insight into the work being undertaken to study and learn about the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

Professor Max Suckling from Plant and Food Research and the Unversity of Auckland is working with local colleagues in Italy, where this pest is going through an outbreak affecting kiwifruit, apples, pears, corn and other crops.

As you can see in the video the group are studying a range of interesting things about BMSB, including sound communication (these bugs use low frequency sound to communicate with each other, which the team are trying to redirect and use against the bugs to disrupt mating, in a similar concept to how pheromone traps work for other pests), sterile insect techniques for control, behaviour at different life stages, and how the public can get involved in mapping location and numbers of the bug using cell phone apps.

The damage Professor Suckling talks about this bug doing to the wide range of crops it affects is a reminder of why we must continue to do all we can to keep it out of New Zealand. Read more about BMSB on the KVH website.

 

Media Releases
22 August 2018
Horticulture welcomes major biocontrol milestone
22 August 2018
The New Zealand horticulture industry has welcomed the Environmental Protection Authority’s (EPA) decision allowing the release of a tiny Samurai Wasp into New Zealand, if ever there was an...
Horticulture welcomes major biocontrol milestone
22 August 2018

The New Zealand horticulture industry has welcomed the Environmental Protection Authority’s (EPA) decision allowing the release of a tiny Samurai Wasp into New Zealand, if ever there was an incursion of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

BMSB Council Chair Alan Pollard applauded the outcome as a major milestone against one of the greatest threats to New Zealand’s horticultural industry and urban communities.

“The industry greatly appreciates the positive decision and acknowledges the consideration given by the EPA to the significant number of submissions made on the application."

”Today we’ve achieved a significant step towards preparing for a major biosecurity risk, which is getting greater by the day, with increasing trade and tourism crossing our borders,” he said.

The Samurai Wasp is the size of a poppy seed and completely harmless to humans and animals except stink bugs. It is a natural enemy of BMSB; the female wasp lays her eggs inside those of the stink bug, killing the nymph in the process. Studies overseas have shown that the wasp can destroy over 70 percent of the eggs in a stink bug egg mass.

“The stink bug could cause hundreds of millions of dollars of losses for our industry, as well as seriously damaging quality of life for all New Zealanders."

“With the heightened awareness of biosecurity risk across New Zealand, our industry is more aware than ever that we cannot afford to be, and never will be, complacent."

“Approving the release of Samurai as a biocontrol is an excellent step but there is more work to do before the wasp is ready to be used as a tool. It’s not the silver bullet and a stink bug incursion would require a multi-faceted approach."

“We’ve seen overseas growers rely on high levels of insecticide as the primary control for BMSB and, while this wasp provides the opportunity to reduce our dependence on chemicals, a full response will require every weapon in our armoury.”

Mr Pollard said the decision was made possible through the collaboration of horticultural industry groups and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), working together under the Government Industry Agreement for readiness and response (GIA). He also acknowledged the science community for its impartial research that resulted in the Council using crucial information to support the application.

Permission to release the wasp will be subject to a number of strict controls that will dictate when, where, and by whom it can be released.

An NZIER report, commissioned by the Samurai Wasp Steering Group, has estimated that gross domestic product would fall by between $1.8 billion and $3.6b by 2038 if BMSB became established. It also estimated the horticulture export value could fall by between $2b and $4.2b.

About the BMSB Council
The BMSB Council is a partnership under GIA between industry and government and is responsible for BMSB readiness and response. The Council consists of member organisations (Horticulture New Zealand, Kiwifruit Vine Health, Ministry for Primary Industries, New Zealand Avocado, New Zealand Apples & Pears, New Zealand Winegrowers, Summerfruit New Zealand, Tomatoes New Zealand, Vegetables New Zealand) and observers (Foundation for Arable Research and New Zealand Plant Producers Inc).

About the Government Industry Agreement (GIA)
GIA operates as a partnership between industry groups and Government to manage pests and diseases that could badly damage New Zealand's primary industries, our economy, and our environment. Under GIA, Signatories share the decision-making responsibilities and costs of preparing for – and responding to – biosecurity incursions. It aims to improve biosecurity outcomes and give everyone the confidence that the best decisions are being made to manage and mitigate biosecurity risks. For more information, visit www.gia.org.nz.

Biosecurity News
9 August 2018
The risk with importing kiwifruit seed
9 August 2018
KVH is aware of international websites offering several varieties of kiwifruit for sale. This is concerning not only because buying seeds online for import into New Zealand could risk introducing a...
The risk with importing kiwifruit seed
9 August 2018

KVH is aware of international websites offering several varieties of kiwifruit for sale. This is concerning not only because buying seeds online for import into New Zealand could risk introducing a plant disease, but also because websites are often falsely declaring contents on the packaging.

Lab test results from recent packages sold as ‘purple hearts kiwifruit’ online and sent to New Zealand (which then became known to KVH, so we had them delivered to us for formal reporting and testing) confirmed the seeds were of course not purple kiwifruit, and a number were seeds from entirely different plants.

Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) staff are fully aware of the sites and there are projects underway to look at what improvements can be made to processes that manage E-commerce sales of risk goods, as well as awareness activities to highlight the rules and risks of imports.

There are strict rules around importing any kiwifruit seed. Seed intended for growing requires a permit to import and a phytosanitary certificate. It must be imported into post entry quarantine where it will be grown and checked for a range of viruses and other plant disease organisms. No seeds will be given biosecurity clearance; only plants which have been inspected and tested will be eligible for clearance.

MPI enforce all requirements and investigate any report of kiwifruit plants grown from unapproved seed imports. Please alert MPI if you aware of any unapproved kiwifruit seed imports by calling the exotic pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66.

Biosecurity News
9 August 2018
KVH presents on the value of partnership and collaboration
9 August 2018
KVH presented at the recent New Zealand Biosecurity Institute NETS conference  (a national biosecurity training seminar) focusing on the value of partnerships and collaboration, highlighted by...
KVH presents on the value of partnership and collaboration
9 August 2018

KVH presented at the recent New Zealand Biosecurity Institute NETS conference  (a national biosecurity training seminar) focusing on the value of partnerships and collaboration, highlighted by our wild kiwifruit programme.

The kiwifruit industry, Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC) and landowners have worked in partnership to destroy wild kiwifruit in the Bay of Plenty for 20 years.  Trial work to establish effective control methods began in 1998 and since then tens of thousands of wild vines have been destroyed, mostly in gullies and pine blocks in Te Puke and south of Tauranga.  There have also been scattered infestations in the Gisborne, Waikato and Nelson/Tasman regions. 

As part of the KVH presentation, technicians from DOC, Landcare Research, NIWA, the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), biosecurity contractors and local government biosecurity officers learnt of the immense value of a co-funded partnership, which in this case has been used as an effective example of local government and industry collaboration prior to GIA (Government Industry Agreements) for biosecurity.  

Last year contractors working in the Bay of Plenty destroyed more than 14,000 wild vines.  Control is effective because the work is undertaken by professional contractors, often in terrain that landowners find difficult to access. Landowners fund 25% of the cost; regional council and the kiwifruit industry fund the remainder.  As it turns out, most of the landowners are also kiwifruit growers so the contribution from industry is often over 60%.  Regional councils in other parts of New Zealand have also provided funding assistance for surveillance and control work in their areas.

Collaboration and partnership have been key to the success of the programme.  The kiwifruit industry greatly values this partnership with local government and landowners.

If you know the location of any unrecorded wild kiwifruit infestations, please contact KVH on 0800 665 825 or your local regional council authority.

Biosecurity News
9 August 2018
Nominate biosecurity champions
9 August 2018
The New Zealand Biosecurity Awards recognise and celebrate individuals who have made a positive difference to New Zealand biosecurity. Entries for 2018 are now open - there a number of different...
Nominate biosecurity champions
9 August 2018

The New Zealand Biosecurity Awards recognise and celebrate individuals who have made a positive difference to New Zealand biosecurity.

Entries for 2018 are now open - there a number of different categories so if you (or your organisation/company) have been involved in a project or event that focuses on biosecurity, and you want to know more, visit the MPI
website for details. This is your opportunity to tell your story and share how you’ve made a difference in protecting the kiwifruit industry or the wider New Zealand environment and economy from biosecurity threats. The closing date for entries is Friday 31 August 2018.

Biosecurity News
9 August 2018
In the news
9 August 2018
Four pests and diseases MPI says to watch out for - With booming tourism and more imported products than ever before, pest hitchhikers such as stink bugs and fruit flies are coming along for the...
In the news
9 August 2018

Four pests and diseases MPI says to watch out for - With booming tourism and more imported products than ever before, pest hitchhikers such as stink bugs and fruit flies are coming along for the ride. Extreme weather events bring rain, wind and microscopic spores of diseases such as myrtle rust from Australia and the Pacific Islands. 

Micro-credentials to target biosecurity - The Primary Industry Training Organisation is welcoming the introduction of micro-credentials, new stand-alone courses, which will help it respond to pressing industry demands, including the eradication of the cattle disease Mycoplasma bovis.

Kiwi kids learn how to keep pests out in new biosecurity board gamewith Mycoplasma bovis and myrtle rust becoming household names, New Zealand is vulnerable to more biosecurity threats than ever before. A new board game developed by an AgResearch scientist is recruiting Kiwi kids in the fight against unwelcome pests.  

Biosecurity News
9 August 2018
Fruit fly found at airport could have been devastating
9 August 2018
Fruit fly larvae carried by a tour party leader from Malaysia could have devastated New Zealand's horticulture industry. Biosecurity officers intercepted the larvae last month in undeclared food...
Fruit fly found at airport could have been devastating
9 August 2018

Fruit fly larvae carried by a tour party leader from Malaysia could have devastated New Zealand's horticulture industry.

Biosecurity officers intercepted the larvae last month in undeclared food from a holiday group at Auckland Airport. The larvae were found in chillies following x-ray screening of the tour leader's baggage. A caterpillar was also detected in some garlic bulbs. The tour leader received a $400 fine for failing to declare the food package.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) says there have been 10 fruit fly interceptions at the border this year and frontline staff are on high alert following recent outbreaks in Adelaide and Tasmania. 

Fruit flies are one of the biggest threats to the kiwifruit industry as any incursion can severely impact where we sell our fruit. While it may be possible to find larvae on fruit trees, a better option is to look out for them in fruit, including tree fallen fruit. Be vigilant, keep watch and report any finds or anything else unusual to MPI on 0800 80 99 66 or KVH on 0800 665 825.

Image: the undeclared food infested with fruit fly that was seized at Auckland Airport.

Biosecurity News
9 August 2018
Tauranga biosecurity partnership becomes Flagship Site
9 August 2018
New Zealand’s Biological Heritage has joined the award-winning Port of Tauranga partnership that is committed to biosecurity excellence. It is the third Flagship Site for the BioHeritage...
Tauranga biosecurity partnership becomes Flagship Site
9 August 2018

New Zealand’s Biological Heritage has joined the award-winning Port of Tauranga partnership that is committed to biosecurity excellence.

It is the third Flagship Site for the BioHeritage Challenge and Director Andrea Byrom said it aligns with their goal of eliminating threats posed by pests, weeds, and pathogens. The Challenge’s involvement supports research on surveillance and detection of pests at the border and bolsters the Port of Tauranga partnership’s commitment to use science to support innovation and grow biosecurity excellence.

KVH is a lead partner in the initiative and the associated annual Biosecurity Week, which recognises that everyone who works on and around the Port, including the freight sector and transitional facilities, can all play a big part in keeping unwanted pests and pathogens out of New Zealand.

Read more here.

Image: Port of Tauranga and KVH staff talking biosecurity with Port workers during the 2017 Biosecurity Week. 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz