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Biosecurity News
20 February 2020
Chocolatier brings BMSB intel to Momentum
20 February 2020
What do bingo and chocolate have in common? You’d never have guessed it, but the answer is Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB). Experts on this unwanted pest shared their expertise during a...
Chocolatier brings BMSB intel to Momentum
20 February 2020

What do bingo and chocolate have in common? You’d never have guessed it, but the answer is Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB).

Experts on this unwanted pest shared their expertise during a workshop for delegates at the recent Zespri Momentum conference, aimed at raising awareness amongst growers about what we can do (as individuals and an industry) to be ready for BMSB, how a big international company and industry are managing this pest, and how we can be prepared to help the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) in a response.

Around 100 people over two workshops played a game of Bug Bingo to learn how to identify BMSB from other native/established bugs in New Zealand. Aleise Puketapu from Plant & Food Research and Zespri  co-created   and ran the games which although a bit of fun, unsurprisingly got very competitive and were taken even more seriously when players realised how difficult it can be to ID a BMSB – many said they learnt how important it is to make a report to the experts at the MPI hotline (0800 80 99 66) if you see anything unusual or new on your orchard, just in case.



Aleise then talked about the BMSB surveillance and trapping programme in the Bay of Plenty and had some traps and plants on-site for delegates to hunt through. This is the first year of the regional trapping programme (which is part of a larger national programme), co-funded by Zespri and KVH. Traps are monitored fortnightly by Aleise at 10 locations running from the Port of Tauranga in Mount Maunganui to Whakatane, concentrated around high-risk transitional facilities based on previous detections of BMSB and the volume of imports these facilities receive that potentially pose biosecurity concern. There have been no BMSB finds in the traps, and they will continue to be monitored until the end of the high-risk season on May.

International guest Tommaso De Gregorio from Ferrero then took the stage and spoke with delegates about how they are managing the impacts of BMSB to their Italian-based business Georgian growers, who supply most of the hazelnuts for their chocolate. 

Within two to three years of arriving in Italy (around 2012/13) the pest became a huge problem and quickly spread. Tommaso set the scene with some grave numbers: In Italy in 2019 alone, BMSB caused almost 600M€ in damages to fruit and vegetables (with kiwifruit heavily affected) and almost 40,000 people days lost in work. He described the year as a tragedy.

When it comes to hazelnuts, an important part of the Ferrero Rocher chocolate business, BMSB is piercing the shell and giving them such a bad flavour that especially when roasted, makes chocolate unpalatable. Also, this piercing helps fungi go through the shell and rots the nuts, as well as sometimes causing early drop.  Ferrero tries to manage the impact and raise awareness through different initiatives ranging from monitoring and trapping to seminars and regular communications with growers via visits and technical bulletins. 

Tommaso particularly noted that monitoring is something Ferrero supports, especially with sticky traps, but they have found the most useful way to understand damage to orchards/crops and best times to spray is plant beating. As BMSB is too active during the day, they go into an orchard before sunrise to shake the trees on plastic sheets and count how many insects are found, providing the best picture of what is happening in orchards. This was a key learning for New Zealand and something that has been flagged for further research.

Summarising his talk, Tommaso reiterated the importance of awareness and monitoring, especially at a local level where every grower must monitor their own orchards. BMSB is a problem that is not going away and it is important to find an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approach that brings all available tools together.

He also pointed out that he and his colleagues are very impressed with New Zealand growers and their proactive attitude to preparedness, which will put all the industry in a better position if BMSB were to arrive here.

Preparedness was also a key message from Charlotte Austin from MPI, who rounded-out the workshop with an overview of the biosecurity response system in New Zealand before having delegates break into teams and work through some short and longer term response management scenarios.

The groups worked through response decision making processes and learnt more about how different teams/workstreams need to gather and share information with each other, and what we as an industry and growers can do to help MPI in a response.

Key takeaways from this were that the more prepared we are on the orchard and as an industry, the better of we will be to limit the impacts of this unwanted pest and the more robust decisions will be. As an industry we also have a key role in social licence to help get messages out and ensure the New Zealand public are aware of how significant this threat is to the New Zealand way of life as well as our industry, and we get  support for any response efforts should they occur in their backyard.

For those who missed the conference and want to hear from the speakers first-hand, the KVH Snapshot podcast is now online and features interviews from the workshop. The Snapshot podcasts are free and available now on SoundCloud or from Apple iTunes.

Biosecurity News
20 February 2020
On the lookout for fruit fly
20 February 2020
There have been no further findings of Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) since the start of the high-risk season in September 2019 and since the closing of the fruit fly response in January this...
On the lookout for fruit fly
20 February 2020

There have been no further findings of Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) since the start of the high-risk season in September 2019 and since the closing of the fruit fly response in January this year.

However, there was one fruit fly-related interception during December/January, when fruit fly eggs were found at the border in Auckland within a consignment of longans (tropical fruit from the same family as lychee) from Thailand.

You can read more in the latest monthly KVH fruit fly risk update which includes data reported by Biosecurity New Zealand, information about what’s happening within New Zealand and the kiwifruit industry to manage the threat posed by fruit flies, and recent international detections.

KVH has also developed a helpful guide for growers detailing the likely sequence of events if a fruit fly response was to occur in a kiwifruit growing region, to allow for business continuity planning at orchard level. The guide has been added to the fruit fly section of the KVH website and can be downloaded here. Please contact us if you would like a copy printed and sent to you.

Remember: the high-risk period for fruit flies runs through the summer months. Be vigilant, keep watch, and report anything unusual to either KVH in 0800 665 825 or Biosecurity New Zealand on 0800 80 99 66. 

Biosecurity News
20 February 2020
KiwiNet hears from USA research experts
20 February 2020
KVH ran it’s six monthly KiwiNet workshop this morning, with around 60 people from across the kiwifruit industry attending the day’s presentations. Being the first KiwiNet gathering of...
KiwiNet hears from USA research experts
20 February 2020

KVH ran it’s six monthly KiwiNet workshop this morning, with around 60 people from across the kiwifruit industry attending the day’s presentations.

Being the first KiwiNet gathering of 2020 it seemed appropriate to start the year off with a hiss and a roar, and include a special session with international guest speaker Kim Hoelmer and his colleague Elijah Talamas. Kim is an entomologist and researcher from the Agricultural Research Service at the US Department of Agriculture, specialising in biological control of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

Speaking to the group, Kim and Elijah talked about the arrival and spread of BMSB in the USA, its range of impacts, and natural enemies - particularly the Samurai Wasp, which is being used in the USA as a biological control and has now established itself in 13 states.  

The workshop also provided an update on industry readiness for our most unwanted pests including a presentation on the network of BMSB traps in the Bay of Plenty; an overview of recent fruit fly response simulations KVH has run with several post-harvest organisations; a run-down on a proposed new approach to managing biosecuirty risk pathways (read more here about the consultation we’ve been running on a poprosed new Pathway Management Plan); and research projects.

You can view PowerPoint presentations from the day on the KVH website here.

KiwiNet is a network of people selected from across the kiwifruit industry who champion biosecurity readiness and coordinate the deployment of industry resources into biosecurity responses. You can read more about the work of the network here or in the recent Kiwifruit Journal.

Company Notices
17 February 2020
Listen to the latest news
17 February 2020
The February Snapshot podcast is now online and features interviews from special guests at the recent Zespri Momentum conference, where Zespri and KVH ran a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) workshop...
Listen to the latest news
17 February 2020

The February Snapshot podcast is now online and features interviews from special guests at the recent Zespri Momentum conference, where Zespri and KVH ran a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) workshop during the two-day event.

Tomasso De Gregorio from Ferrero (the chocolate company) spoke about the effect BMSB is having on their hazelnut growers, and Aleise Puketapu from Plant & Food Research spoke about BMSB surveillance in the Bay of Plenty.

The Snapshot podcasts are free and available now on SoundCloud or from Apple iTunes.

Company Notices
17 February 2020
Listen to the latest news
17 February 2020
Snapshot is the podcast from KVH. Every month the KVH team brings you a summary of recent news and activities, seasonal orchard management advice, feature pests to be on the lookout for, and...
Listen to the latest news
17 February 2020

Snapshot is the podcast from KVH.

Every month the KVH team brings you a summary of recent news and activities, seasonal orchard management advice, feature pests to be on the lookout for, and reminders of upcoming events. Sit back and enjoy the content, knowing you’ll never miss out on all the latest happenings.

The Snapshot is free and available on SoundCloud or from Apple iTunes. Download the latest episode and subscribe today so that new episodes are automatically sent to you.

We hope you enjoy listening and look forward to your feedback.

 

Biosecurity News
5 February 2020
The fruit fly response at a glance
5 February 2020
·         10 – the number of solitary Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) found through surveillance trapping in the Northcote area since February...
The fruit fly response at a glance
5 February 2020

·         10 – the number of solitary Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) found through surveillance trapping in the Northcote area since February 2019.

·         4,600 – the number of traps set in the greater Auckland area to find three different types of fruit flies. These remain in place and are part of a national fruit fly surveillance programme with over 7,800 traps nationwide.

·         While 10 adult male flies were found (the pheromone traps attract males), no evidence of larvae, pupae, eggs, or female flies was found.

·         160 – the number of people in the field, and in Wellington, involved in the response at any given time.

·         5,766 – the number of properties in the Controlled Area and subject to movement controls on fresh produce and garden waste.

·         1.5 tonnes of fruit was collected from the area and inspected for fruit fly larvae.

·         145 tonnes of produce was collected and disposed of throughout the operation.

Biosecurity News
5 February 2020
Last chance to control moth plant before it flowers and produces seed
5 February 2020
Growers are reminded that moth plant (pictured to the right, heavily infesting a casuarina shelter belt) needs to be controlled now before seed pods form and mature. Moth plant is a poisonous (the...
Last chance to control moth plant before it flowers and produces seed
5 February 2020

Growers are reminded that moth plant (pictured to the right, heavily infesting a casuarina shelter belt) needs to be controlled now before seed pods form and mature.

Moth plant is a poisonous (the sap can cause a painful dermatitis) South American vine, common in coastal areas of the upper North Island, and very invasive in orchard shelter belts or nearby weedy areas.  It harbours passion vine hopper and slows shelter trimmers, so is very unwelcome in kiwifruit orchards. 

If possible, dig vines out of a shelter belt using a sharp spade.  If you try to pull large vines they often snap off at the base and regrow.  Wear gloves and protective clothing to avoid any contact with the sap.

In a world first, the Bay of Plenty Regional Council has just released a biocontrol agent - the moth beetle - in a suitable area near Tauranga to assist in the control of this pest. The larvae of the moth beetle feed on the vine’s roots, killing many vines. Watch a video about the release here.

It will take some years for the beetle to build a population which will reduce moth plant infestations, so do continue to destroy moth plant vines in all kiwifruit orchards.

Biosecurity News
5 February 2020
Successful end to fruit fly response in Auckland
5 February 2020
Northcote fruit fly operations have ended and restrictions on the movement of fruit and vegetables on Auckland's North Shore have been lifted. The move signals the end of an almost year-long...
Successful end to fruit fly response in Auckland
5 February 2020

Northcote fruit fly operations have ended and restrictions on the movement of fruit and vegetables on Auckland's North Shore have been lifted.

The move signals the end of an almost year-long operation, including a massive effort by the local community, triggered by the discovery of a Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) in a surveillance trap in the area last February.

It's now been 6 months since a fly was last trapped in the area, and this, along with an intensive baiting programme throughout the spring and the inspection of hundreds of kilos of fruit without a find, has given confidence there is currently no breeding population of the QFF in Northcote.

Nationwide routine surveillance will continue – there are 7,800 fruit fly traps spread across the country and more than 4,600 of these in the Auckland area. These traps are set for three exotic fruit fly species of concern: the QFF, Mediterranean Fruit Fly and Oriental Fruit Fly.

The financial impact of a fruit fly incursion to New Zealand’s billion-dollar horticulture industry is something we simply cannot afford – the kiwifruit industry alone could be impacted by up to $430 million. The estimated $18 million investment put into this robust and successful response is justified and confirms the commitment Government Industry Agreement (GIA) partners, such as KVH, have to protecting growers from such serious threats.

Read the full announcement from Biosecurity New Zealand here, and read the statement in support from GIA response partners on the KVH website here.

Protocols & Movement Controls
5 February 2020
Updated protocols
5 February 2020
Several KVH Protocols and Information Sheets have been updated on our website to reflect minor changes.  Please check to make sure you are referring to the latest version when referencing...
Updated protocols
5 February 2020

Several KVH Protocols and Information Sheets have been updated on our website to reflect minor changes.  Please check to make sure you are referring to the latest version when referencing them.

Under the National Psa-V Pest Management Plan (NPMP) KVH Protocols have been established for controlling the movement of risk items capable of spreading Psa. The controls require that specific conditions are met where inter-regional movement is essential. These can differ across different risk items depending on the nature and level of risk they pose. Find the Protocols here.

Grower News
5 February 2020
Support talented young horticulturalists
5 February 2020
Head along to the Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition at the Te Puke A&P Show this weekend in support of the up-and-coming horticulturalists vying for the title. Eight competitors,...
Support talented young horticulturalists
5 February 2020

Head along to the Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition at the Te Puke A&P Show this weekend in support of the up-and-coming horticulturalists vying for the title.

Eight competitors, known for their passion as well as their exciting futures, will battle it out in a series of practical and theoretical horticultural activities designed to test contestants in a competitive, fast-paced environment. There will also be a biosecurity quiz round run by KVH who will be at the A&P Show all day on Saturday to answer any questions you may have about the work we’re doing to keep unwanted pests and diseases from establishing within our kiwifruit orchards and communities.

Media Releases
31 January 2020
Auckland fruit fly response comes to a successful end
31 January 2020
A joint Government and industry response to unwanted fruit flies has been closed out, with New Zealand fruit and vegetable grower representatives saying they are pleased with the successful...
Auckland fruit fly response comes to a successful end
31 January 2020

A joint Government and industry response to unwanted fruit flies has been closed out, with New Zealand fruit and vegetable grower representatives saying they are pleased with the successful result.

Stu Hutchings, Chair of the Fruit Fly Council - made up of impacted industry sector representatives and Biosecurity New Zealand under the Government Industry Agreement for Biosecurity Readiness and Response (GIA) partnership - says the Auckland response followed the pre-agreed operational plans established by the Council and tested in previous responses.

Council members have been involved in the decision-making process during the almost year-long response, ensuring the interests of New Zealand’s primary producers were always represented.

“Fruit fly finds are of great concern for New Zealand’s industries and that’s why we’ve been part of the governance group to ensure the most appropriate action was always taken, minimising impacts to growers.”

“Since the very first fruit fly detection in February 2019 it’s been a priority for us all to work together in the best interests of growers and do everything we can to ensure collaboration between industry and Biosecurity New Zealand.”

“The good news is that response activities - both at a governance and operational level - have worked and prove that we can all have continued confidence in our biosecurity system.”

“The financial impact of a fruit fly incursion to New Zealand’s billion-dollar horticulture industry is something we simply cannot afford – the kiwifruit industry alone could be impacted by up to $430 million. The estimated $18 million investment put into this robust and successful response is justified and confirms the commitment GIA partners have to protecting growers from such serious threats.”

Stu adds that industry members have also had a huge role in helping staff the response, contributing to a range of field activities such as fruit collection and inspection, trapping, home visits and public awareness events. 

“The feedback we’ve had from the many people who took part in the response is that they learnt a lot about specialised biosecurity response activities that they can take back to their own organisations and industries, and that they appreciated the public su

“The perspectives of the general public and our fruit and vegetable growers really came together and hammered home the range of economic, lifestyle and cultural impacts we all face if an unwanted pest like fruit fly were to establish here.”

All the industry members of the Fruit Fly Council will continue to advocate for their growers as active members of the GIA partnership, and say they are more prepared than ever as a result of this response to continue working in partnership with Government to ensure similar successful outcomes in the future. 

Background:
If they established here, fruit flies could have serious consequences for New Zealand’s horticultural industry. The most likely way that fruit flies can arrive New Zealand is in infested fresh fruit and vegetables. Be vigilant and keep watch. It is often difficult to spot adult fruit flies on fruit trees, the better option is to look out for any larvae in fruit. Report anything of concern to the pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66.

The Fruit Fly Council came together under GIA in May 2016 and comprises New Zealand Apples and Pears, Kiwifruit Vine Health, New Zealand Avocado Growers Association, Citrus New Zealand, MPI, Summerfruit New Zealand, Vegetables New Zealand, Horticulture NZ and Tomatoes New Zealand. Read more here.

Company Notices
23 January 2020
Welcome to the new year
23 January 2020
Whether you’re back in the thick of it or still enjoying an extended break and taking advantage of the good weather, we hope you all had a merry Christmas and were able to enjoy the holiday...
Welcome to the new year
23 January 2020

Whether you’re back in the thick of it or still enjoying an extended break and taking advantage of the good weather, we hope you all had a merry Christmas and were able to enjoy the holiday season with family and friends.

We look forward to working with you throughout the year to ensure our biosecurity system remains strong and we continue to keep damaging pests and diseases from reaching our orchards.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz