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Biosecurity News
6 September 2018
Reporting Psa symptoms
6 September 2018
If Psa-like symptoms are found for the first time on your orchard report these to KVH on 0800 665 825. Growers can also contact their packhouse technical representative for advice and sample...
Reporting Psa symptoms
6 September 2018

If Psa-like symptoms are found for the first time on your orchard report these to KVH on 0800 665 825. Growers can also contact their packhouse technical representative for advice and sample collection if required. Hill Laboratories carry out routine Psa testing weekly on Wednesday only but can process samples urgently at KVH request.

KVH continues to pay for lab testing in Exclusion regions (Far North, Whangarei and South Island). Other testing may be approved on a case-by-case basis.

If suspicious symptoms are found, follow processes in the KVH Information sheet: Psa sample collection and testing.

Protocols & Movement Controls
6 September 2018
Mandatory orchard monitoring
6 September 2018
All growers in Exclusion regions and all growers with ‘Not Detected’ orchards in all regions are required to carry out a round of mandatory monitoring between 15 September and 15 October,...
Mandatory orchard monitoring
6 September 2018

All growers in Exclusion regions and all growers with ‘Not Detected’ orchards in all regions are required to carry out a round of mandatory monitoring between 15 September and 15 October, with results due to KVH by 31 October. Monitoring is a critical component of establishing Psa-presence, location, and volume so that it can be managed.

An online monitoring form is available on the KVH website here. Please call KVH on 0800 665 825 if you have any questions or require assistance to complete the online form.

Why is monitoring so important? Growers in Exclusion regions and with ‘Not Detected’ orchards need to monitor vines for Psa early, so we can act if anything is identified and protect the rest of their orchard as well as nearby growers.

Regular orchard monitoring enables growers to become familiar with their vines. It’s about learning what is usual, and what isn’t. Nine times out 10 when you see something odd it will be nothing, and that’s good, because it means that the one time it’s something of concern, we’re finding it. The sooner we learn about something unusual the more we can do to help.

KVH has developed ’Kiwifruit’s Most Unwanted’ information and fact sheets, which are available on the KVH website. While these organisms are considered the greatest potential threats to the kiwifruit industry, the next incursion we face could be another damaging pest or disease not yet on our radar. Look out for plants displaying any unusual symptoms and pests not commonly seen or identifiable to monitoring staff.

Biosecurity News
6 September 2018
Our most unwanted pests
6 September 2018
Fruit flies and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) are considered two of the biggest biosecurity threats to the kiwifruit industry and from September they are both in their highest-risk period for...
Our most unwanted pests
6 September 2018

Fruit flies and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) are considered two of the biggest biosecurity threats to the kiwifruit industry and from September they are both in their highest-risk period for entry into New Zealand. A quick reminder of the damage these unwanted pests can do and what to look out for:

Fruit flies:

·        High likelihood of entry - has crossed our borders many times before.

·        Extended spread in Australia.

·        Severe market access restrictions, especially for Queensland Fruit Fly, which is not present in nearly all kiwifruit markets.

·        The high-risk season is now. Be on the lookout for the flies as well as the larvae in fruit.

BMSB:

·        High likelihood of entry – particularly in shipping containers, cars and machinery, and passenger luggage.

·        Significant production impacts for a wide range of crops.

·        Early detection needed because this pest is extremely difficult to eradicate. It’s also a major nuisance pest infesting homes.

For more information on these and other biosecurity threats to the kiwifruit industry, see the fact sheets and images on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
6 September 2018
Managing the BMSB risk
6 September 2018
Tighter import rules As mentioned in the last Bulletin, KVH continues to advocate strongly on behalf of the industry for strict biosecurity border controls which will make it harder for the Brown...
Managing the BMSB risk
6 September 2018

Tighter import rules

As mentioned in the last Bulletin, KVH continues to advocate strongly on behalf of the industry for strict biosecurity border controls which will make it harder for the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) to make its way here.

There have been additional measures for the high-risk Vehicles, Machinery and Equipment Pathways introduced. The measures now target risk goods from 16 countries (Austria, Bulgaria, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungry, Italy, Liechtenstein, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Spain, Slovenia, Switzerland and the USA).  New measures have also been introduced for vehicles from Japan after the high number of interceptions on this pathway last season.

We are pleased that the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has also announced mandatory treatments applied to all containers from Italy (introduced last year) will again be applied this high-risk season as well as during the 2019/2020 season. MPI have increased the duration of this treatment period so that it extends from September through until the end of April.

KVH applaud MPI’s efforts to introduce these measures and push the management of risk offshore resulting in much greater protection to our industry.

Research learnings

Professor Max Suckling from Plant and Food Research and the University of Auckland has published another video on his research in Italy, using novel non-chemical techniques to disrupt BMSB mating. This is a more technical video that can be viewed here.

i-Site displays

This summer KVH is stocking the Mount Maunganui and Cruise Terminal i-Sites with biosecurity flyers raising awareness about high-risk pest threats (mainly BMSB) potentially hitchhiking their way across our borders. The i-Sites double as ticketing offices are often the first point of call for visitors and cruise ship passengers wanting to know more about the region and plan their time here.

Biosecurity News
6 September 2018
Biosecurity buzz at roadshows
6 September 2018
KVH took part in the recent Zespri Grower Roadshows, meeting and speaking with growers about new developments and recent biosecurity activity we’ve been undertaking. Chief Executive Stu...
Biosecurity buzz at roadshows
6 September 2018

KVH took part in the recent Zespri Grower Roadshows, meeting and speaking with growers about new developments and recent biosecurity activity we’ve been undertaking.

Chief Executive Stu Hutchings presented at the roadshows on Spotted Lanternfly (SLF), a pest native to China that is now wreaking havoc in Pennsylvania, USA. KVH Board Member Simon Cook recently visited the state to learn more about their incursion – read more about what he saw, and the work being done by KVH and the Ministry for Primary Industries to better understand the potential threat SLF poses to our industry.   

Heading into the high-risk season for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), Stu also shared with growers a video demonstrating the impacts of the bug on kiwifruit in Italy. The video helps us gain a better understanding of what Italian growers are facing and provides a practical on-orchard view of the severe damage BMSB can do. Watch the vide on the KVH YouTube channel here.

Biosecurity News
6 September 2018
GoldFutures project reviews
6 September 2018
South Auckland and Waikato growers involved in the GoldFutures project met this week to review data from year two of this four-year Psa research project. Tauranga, Te Puke and Edgecumbe growers...
GoldFutures project reviews
6 September 2018

South Auckland and Waikato growers involved in the GoldFutures project met this week to review data from year two of this four-year Psa research project. Tauranga, Te Puke and Edgecumbe growers similarly met in August to discuss their results and workshop orchard specific improvements for the 2019 season.

The GoldFutures project is led by Phillip Elmer and Stephen Hoyte from Plant and Food Research and includes 10 orchard pairs, all with challenging environmental conditions for Psa. Within each orchard pair, one site has historically shown fewer Psa impacts, and the project aims to better understand management practices that link to this result.

Year one results uncovered some sprayer performance issues, and noticeable differences in the numbers and timings of sprays applied within the orchard groupings. Orchards less affected by Psa had generally followed a more robust and better-timed spray programme and had more emphasis on tool hygiene. Second year results showed growers had adopted changes recommended from the previous year, and overall differences between “challenged” and “managed” blocks had decreased. Growers identified further refinements for the coming year with improved orchard shelter and drainage, overcoming the challenge of getting sprays applied to difficult wet blocks.

Research results are still being collated and will be presented through Kiwifruit Journal articles and via the KVH website when available.

Biosecurity News
23 August 2018
First Psa exudate heralds spring
23 August 2018
KVH has received reports of Psa exudate in Gold3 vines from Gisborne, Edgecumbe, and Maketu sites this week. As sap begins to rise symptoms of Psa will begin to appear and growers are recommended to...
First Psa exudate heralds spring
23 August 2018

KVH has received reports of Psa exudate in Gold3 vines from Gisborne, Edgecumbe, and Maketu sites this week. As sap begins to rise symptoms of Psa will begin to appear and growers are recommended to monitor areas more prone to Psa to be sure they have a good understanding of where risk lies this season. If ground conditions have limited the opportunity to apply copper through winter, now is the time to apply a spray, ensuring a one-week window is maintained between bud enhancing spays and copper.

Where pruning gangs are still at work an emphasis on tool hygiene is also recommended. Reports of fresh Psa exudate associated with autumn girdles suggests infection may be related to poor tool hygiene (patterns of consecutive plants within rows affected is being observed).

Biosecurity News
23 August 2018
Tighter import rules to stop stink bug
23 August 2018
KVH continues to advocate strongly on behalf of the industry for strict biosecurity border controls and backs Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) action around new treatment and cleaning rules for...
Tighter import rules to stop stink bug
23 August 2018

KVH continues to advocate strongly on behalf of the industry for strict biosecurity border controls and backs Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) action around new treatment and cleaning rules for imported vehicles and machinery, which will make it harder for Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) to make their way across our borders.

The updated Import Health Standard (IHS) comes into force 1 September and has a focus on Japan following biosecurity issues earlier this year with contaminated vehicle carriers. There are also new restrictions on imports from many European countries, where the stink bug is rapidly spreading.

Under the Standard:

·      14 more countries have been added to the list requiring mandatory treatment of vehicles and machinery during the stink bug season. This requirement previously only applied to vehicles from the United States and Italy.

·      Used imports from Japan will need to be both treated and cleaned offshore as part of an approved system during the season.

·      All other new and used imports (during the stink bug season) from other countries covered by the standard will need to be treated or go through an approved system.

·      Vehicle manufacturers will have the option of applying to MPI for biosecurity approval of their supply chain processes, avoiding the need to treat each new unit. This involves having strict controls in place to reduce the risk of contamination.

·      Used machinery from any country must have a certificate proving it has undergone thorough cleaning and treatment before arrival in New Zealand. There must be evidence the machinery was disassembled for cleaning. It must also arrive with a sticker showing how and when it was treated.

·      MPI can approve alternative treatments, but only if there is proof they can produce the same outcome as the approved methods.

Read more detail about the IHS here.

Grower News
23 August 2018
Psa research update
23 August 2018
Around 80 growers and technical reps attended the KVH/Zespri-run Psa research update held at Baypark this week. Growers heard from speakers who outlined the latest progress on several research...
Psa research update
23 August 2018

Around 80 growers and technical reps attended the KVH/Zespri-run Psa research update held at Baypark this week.

Growers heard from speakers who outlined the latest progress on several research projects currently underway, including copper and other product resistance and the breeding programme.

Paul Hassan from Syngenta outlined systemicity and crop safety of Actigard, and Stephen Hoyte presented on Aureo Gold, a yeast-based product currently moving towards registration as an additional Psa product.

Attendees were also given an update on the GoldFutures project by Stephen Hoyte from Plant and Food Research. This project recommends “best practice” Psa management backed by findings from 10 Gold3 orchard pairs across six growing regions. Frost and budrot projects as well as a review of the possible role of guttation in the disease cycle were also presented providing good insight into advances in our understanding of Psa.

A summary of the meeting along with the presentations and a video taken on the day will be available on the both the KVH and Zespri canopy websites soon.

Grower News
23 August 2018
Purchasing plants?
23 August 2018
KVH has been made aware of the theft of kiwifruit plants from a nursery recently. We remind all growers that only Kiwifruit Plant Certificaton Scheme (KPCS) certified plants should be sourced, from...
Purchasing plants?
23 August 2018

KVH has been made aware of the theft of kiwifruit plants from a nursery recently. We remind all growers that only Kiwifruit Plant Certificaton Scheme (KPCS) certified plants should be sourced, from KPCS nurseries. All plants come with dispatch records from the nursery, including batch information which is vital for traceability in the event of an incursion. These should be filed with GAP records.

For growers wishing to purchase plants, there is a list of nurseries who have met the KPCS Full Certification requirements on the KVH website. Restricted certification plants are available from nurseries named in the Restricted Certification Nursery List. These plants can only go to Psa-V positive orchards.

Biosecurity News
23 August 2018
EPA approves Samurai Wasp application
23 August 2018
KVH, the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and other members of the New Zealand horticulture industry have welcomed the Environmental Protection Authority’s (EPA) decision allowing the...
EPA approves Samurai Wasp application
23 August 2018

KVH, the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and other members of the New Zealand horticulture industry have welcomed the Environmental Protection Authority’s (EPA) decision allowing the release of the tiny Samurai Wasp into New Zealand, if ever there is an incursion of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

The outcome is a major milestone against one of the greatest threats (should it occur) to New Zealand’s kiwifruit, horticultural industries and urban communities, and was made possible with the support of growers and industry groups who alongside KVH, made submissions and presented their views to the EPA during the consultation process. This was an excellent effort and we thank all those who contributed to the process. Of the 69 submissions made in the consultation process 24 were from the kiwifruit industry in support of this application.

The Samurai Wasp is the size of a poppy seed and completely harmless to humans and animals except stink bugs. It is a natural enemy of BMSB; the female wasp lays her eggs inside those of the stink bug, killing the nymph in the process. Studies overseas have shown that the wasp can destroy over 70 percent of the eggs in a stink bug egg mass. It also provides an opportunity to be proactive in our approach and gives us another tool we can use to manage the stink bug. Permission to release the wasp will be subject to a number of strict controls that will dictate when, where, and by whom it can be released. Biocontrol agents are normally sought once pests become a significant problem. This is the first time that we are aware of where a biological control has been approved before a pest has established

The application seeking permission to release the wasp in the event of an incursion was made to the EPA by KVH, Horticulture NZ and other horticultural industry groups through the BMSB Council as part of the Government Industry Agreement (GIA). Read the media release announcing the decision here.

Biosecurity News
23 August 2018
Spotted Lanternfly - the next big threat?
23 August 2018
Pennsylvania, USA, is currently dealing with an incursion of Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatua), and the information coming from this region is concerning. The numbers that this pest is building...
Spotted Lanternfly - the next big threat?
23 August 2018

Pennsylvania, USA, is currently dealing with an incursion of Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatua), and the information coming from this region is concerning. The numbers that this pest is building to may even exceed Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). It results in large amounts of sooty mould growth, is a prolific hitchhiker and has a large host range that includes kiwifruit. Spotted Lanternfly is a known kiwifruit pest in its native range of China, but like many pests it appears far more damaging as an invasive pest with no natural predators to keep population numbers in check.

As part of his recent Nuffield Scholarship travels, KVH Director Simon Cook visited Pennsylvania where the SLF has been found and is proving to be harmful to a wide range of crops.

“I spent some time in one of the worst hit spots in the state, and even the local entomologist himself commented this was the most invasive pest he has ever seen - given they have been through Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) incursions that is a pretty telling statement. They’re seeing heavy infection and feeding on a wide range of fruit and vegetables, and the damage being done is so severe that it is thought to be the cause of grape vines failing to survive winter.” 

“Unfortunately, SLF wasn’t picked up in Pennsylvania until a significant population had already established, making ongoing eradication attempts difficult. There is some relatively good news though, in that a second US incursion in Virginia suggests if we identify SLF early before a large population is present, we have a real chance at eradication. This incursion is around two to three years old now and is still limited to a small one-mile radius area, so it does take time for numbers to build, providing good control opportunities.”  

KVH is taking this advice onboard and has included SLF as a feature pest in our upcoming calendar for front line staff at the port and transitional facilities and have included it in a review project to better understand the potential threats to our industry and how we may manage it. The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is also well aware of this threat and while there haven’t been any border interceptions to date, the risk of SLF would increase if this pest continues to expand its invasive range across the US.

Growers may also be interested to read more about this pest in a feature article in the New York Times.  

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz