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Biosecurity News
16 May 2019
Remove unpicked kiwifruit from vines
16 May 2019
Growers are reminded that unpicked kiwifruit must be removed from vines by 1 July. Unpicked fruit can increase the amount of wild kiwifruit plants establishing in nearby areas of native bush or...
Remove unpicked kiwifruit from vines
16 May 2019

Growers are reminded that unpicked kiwifruit must be removed from vines by 1 July.

Unpicked fruit can increase the amount of wild kiwifruit plants establishing in nearby areas of native bush or forestry as fruit ripening over the winter months provides a food source for birds. Birds spread seed through their droppings, together with a small fertiliser package. A proportion of this seed can readily germinate.

Unmanaged kiwifruit vines, including those with unpicked fruit, may also be a potential host for plant disease organisms.

Unpicked fruit needs to be dropped to the ground and mulched. This prevents mass-feeding by birds over an extended period.

Under the National Psa Pest Management Plan (NPMP) it is a requirement to remove all unpicked fruit from vines by 1 July each year.  After this date KVH will follow-up reports of unpicked fruit with orchard owners and post-harvest companies.

Biosecurity News
16 May 2019
Psa protection
16 May 2019
The Psa Risk Model predicts low-risk weather for most regions into next week, providing growers with a great opportunity to apply all-important post-harvest coppers. Where there is no risk of...
Psa protection
16 May 2019

The Psa Risk Model predicts low-risk weather for most regions into next week, providing growers with a great opportunity to apply all-important post-harvest coppers.

Where there is no risk of drift to unharvested blocks, Actigard should also be applied to strengthen protection into the leaf-fall period. Most canopies are still in good condition with ample green leaves to absorb Actigard (see image below) but the window of opportunity for this product will close as leaves deteriorate and more frosts occur.
 



Advice is to also monitor blocks for evidence of Psa and check young plants and girdled vines for evidence of Psa symptoms. Focus on more Psa prone areas of the orchard first, and mark affected vines to prompt the removal of infections through winter. Flag possible hot spot areas and use this information to create winter pruning strategies, and spring monitoring.


KVH has this week received calls from growers who are seeing red exudate on girdles indicating Psa risk is still out there. Good proactive management will minimise orchard risk going forward.

R&D News
16 May 2019
New research published
16 May 2019
Scientific research publications that drive KVH policies and management advice are added to our website as they are finalised. Growers are encouraged to look them up and have a browse of the many...
New research published
16 May 2019

Scientific research publications that drive KVH policies and management advice are added to our website as they are finalised. Growers are encouraged to look them up and have a browse of the many different reports we make available.

Over recent weeks the following reports have been added:

·         Advancing EMix: The efficacy of Emix against Psa is dose dependent, withe results in this study showing that higher concentrations of Emix are required to control Psa in more complex environments.

·         Pest reviews: looking at the biology, distribution, impacts and management of Spotted Lanternfly, South American fruit fly, BMSB, Fruit piercing moth, and White Peach Scale. Reviews also provided information of potential control options for kiwifruit growers in New Zealand.

Media Releases
7 May 2019
Stinky pest thwarted
7 May 2019
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one of the biggest risks facing New Zealand’s horticultural sector and outdoor way of life, says a group of horticulture-wide organisations who have...
Stinky pest thwarted
7 May 2019

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one of the biggest risks facing New Zealand’s horticultural sector and outdoor way of life, says a group of horticulture-wide organisations who have come together to help stop the damaging hitch-hiker making a home here.

Dr Ed Massey, Biosecurity and Emergency Response Manager for New Zealand Winegrowers and Chair of the BMSB Council says overseas this stinky pest has caused catastrophic damage in some areas where it has established.

“Although BMSB has managed to reach our shores in the past, it hasn’t found a foothold here. This is largely due to the increased awareness people across the country have to be on the lookout and report the unusual bug, combined with increased risk management measures and the vigilance of Biosecurity New Zealand’s border staff at the frontline.”

Backing this up are the increasingly combined efforts of Government and industry organisations who have come together to jointly prepare for and respond to the potential impacts of BMSB, says Ed.

In 2017 the BMSB Council was founded through the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for biosecurity readiness and response. The Council is responsible for ensuring New Zealand is collectively prepared to mitigate the risks posed by this pest.

“The stink bug could cause hundreds of millions of dollars of losses for our horticulture industry, as well as seriously damaging quality of life for all New Zealanders. There is heightened awareness of biosecurity risk across the country and our industry is more aware than ever that we cannot afford to ever be complacent."

“The most recent high-risk season for BMSB started in September 2018 and finished at the end of April. There have been more than 200 live BMSB found over that time and importantly, we’ve prevented them from establishing.”

“The finds have included a batch of live bugs that were discovered in a box of shoes bought online from overseas, finds onboard ships coming to our shores, and single bugs that were reported by residents in Mt Maunganui and Glenfield, Auckland.”

Ed adds that over the last year the BMSB Council has made significant progress towards mitigating the potential impact of a BMSB incursion.

“In August last year the Council successfully applied to the Environmental Protection Authority to release – with strict controls - a BMSB biocontrol in the event of an incursion. This was a major milestone and provides us with another weapon in our fight against the stink bug. We’re currently planning how we might use the wasp to ensure any future release is as effective as possible.”

“We’ve also had BMSB Council representatives recently in Tbilisi, Georgia – a country facing a disastrous BMSB outbreak - to learn more about potential management options.” 

In addition, the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has recently proposed amendments to relevant import regulations to further mitigate the risk of BMSB entering New Zealand from high-risk countries.

“The BMSB Council backs these moves to strengthen New Zealand’s biosecurity and ensure we are doing everything possible to continue to keep the pest at bay. There is always more we can learn but we are on the right track and confident that this year’s activities have improved our collective readiness for BMSB.”  

The strongest weapon in the nation’s fight against BMSB remains public awareness says Ed.

“In many countries, the winter months when the insects move inside homes to keep warm have been the time of year when new populations have been detected.  It can infest homes in the thousands and is almost impossible to get rid of.”

“Unlike fruit fly or other well-known pests that are associated with specific commodities, BMSB can be found on a wide range of imported goods and in travellers’ luggage as they arrive in New Zealand. The majority have been found on ships, mail packages and personal effects coming into the country.”

“This is why help from the public is so important and makes all the difference. We ask everyone to keep an eye out for this pest because it’s feasible that it might turn up in an overseas present or package, in the pocket of a jacket in a suitcase, or even any number of surprising places - BMSB is a seriously clever hitch-hiker.

If you think you have seen BMSB inside your home catch it; snap it; report it. Call the Biosecurity New Zealand hotline 0800 80 99 66 to report your find.

How to identify BMSB

There are currently other species of stink bugs found in New Zealand that could be confused with BMSB. Key distinguishing features of the adult BMSB are:

- It is about the size of a 10c coin and 14-17mm long.

- Look for black and white banding on the antennae and alternate black and white markings on the abdomen

Image: BMSB on the side of a building in Italy in autumn 2017. Credit: Udine Today.

 

Biosecurity News
2 May 2019
Locals thanked for response support
2 May 2019
KVH and other members of the fruit fly response team were in Auckland during the weekend running several thank you events. The response team had a presence at the Otara markets on Saturday, and...
Locals thanked for response support
2 May 2019

KVH and other members of the fruit fly response team were in Auckland during the weekend running several thank you events.

The response team had a presence at the Otara markets on Saturday, and the Northcote shopping mall and Devonport ferry terminal on Sunday.

In Otara and Devonport the events were designed to thank those heavily affected by the restrictions in place to limit the movement of fruit during the response, and hand out tote bags that included information about response activities (such as how much fruit was collected, how many bins and signs were put out etc) and the role the public has played in stopping a population establishing.

In Northcote, there was a focus on thanking people for their efforts thus far and reminding them that restrictions are still in place, as well as how to identify flies/larvae and what to do if they spot anything unusual. Tote bags with information leaflets and other giveaways were handed out.

The events were busy and positive, with high levels of awareness and input from the public.

Biosecurity News
2 May 2019
KiwiNet making a difference in the fruit fly fight
2 May 2019
KiwiNet – the kiwifruit industry’s official team of selected people who champion biosecurity readiness and coordinate the deployment of kiwifruit industry resources into bioseucrity...
KiwiNet making a difference in the fruit fly fight
2 May 2019

KiwiNet – the kiwifruit industry’s official team of selected people who champion biosecurity readiness and coordinate the deployment of kiwifruit industry resources into bioseucrity responses – has been heavily involved in the Auckland fruit fly response.

There have been more than 165 staff days so far contributed by KiwiNet members, who have used their skills and expertise to help with trapping, ground surveying, fruit collection, and public awareness activities.

Profiles of two team members have been published, sharing their experience working on the frontline – read all about Lori from OPAC and Sheryl from EastPack.

You can also view a collection of images from KiwiNet members on the response
here.

Biosecurity News
2 May 2019
BMSB season comes to a close
2 May 2019
Since the start of the high-risk season in September 2018 there have been 212 live BMSB detected. Read more in the latest Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) risk update. The update includes...
BMSB season comes to a close
2 May 2019

Since the start of the high-risk season in September 2018 there have been 212 live BMSB detected.

Read more in the latest Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) risk update.

The update includes latest interception data, surveillance information, and an update about ongoing work alongside Australian officials to align activities.

We’re at the end of the highest risk time of year for BMSB but there is never zero risk. Continue to be on the lookout and report anything unusual to KVH or the Biosecurity New Zealand hotline. There are handy ID guides and videos that demonstrate the impact this nasty bug could have on kiwifruit orchards – and our lifestyles – on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
2 May 2019
Passenger and mail biosecurity review released
2 May 2019
Early this week the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) announced the findings of an independent review of its biosecurity passenger and mail controls at the border. The review was commissioned...
Passenger and mail biosecurity review released
2 May 2019

Early this week the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) announced the findings of an independent review of its biosecurity passenger and mail controls at the border.

The review was commissioned after fruit fly was first detected in Auckland earlier this year and overall has found that border services in the mail and passenger pathways protect New Zealand well.

The review also notes some significant challenges the border is under and that ongoing improvement is essential. Several recommendations have been made and are now being considered, including:

·         fast deployment of new scanning technologies for suitcases and rapid scanning of hand baggage

·         more development of public awareness measures, such as smartphone-enabled digital tools for arriving travellers

·         separating arriving passengers carrying commercial quantities of food from other international travellers

·         extending a scheme involving the pre-clearance of approved food packages carried by passengers from Tonga and imposing stiff penalties for any breaches

·         charging cruise ship operators that are not covered by the existing accreditation scheme for costs relating to biosecurity services

·         improved access to intelligence to aid risk assessment decisions regarding express freight

·         introducing new scanning technology at the mail centre.

The recommendations reinforce a lot of things that are already on MPI’s radar and they will look at how they can fit these into their existing work programme. There are also recommendations expected to come from the separate cargo review underway.

KVH welcomes and supports the findings of the review. In our ongoing discussions with MPI we will refer to the official findings to help guide decision-making and ensure all efforts are undertaken to continue protecting our borders and the kiwifruit industry from exotic threats.  

You can read the full report here.

Biosecurity News
2 May 2019
In the news
2 May 2019
The worst invasive species the US has seen in 150 years The Spotted Lanternfly is considered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to be the worst invasive species in the last 150 years. That's...
In the news
2 May 2019

The worst invasive species the US has seen in 150 years
The Spotted Lanternfly is considered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to be the worst invasive species in the last 150 years. That's because they threaten products from wine to apples, lumber and craft beer. Industries that amount to $18 Billion in the state of Pennsylvania, alone.

Read the KVH fact sheet on Spotted Lanternfly here.

Biosecurity News
2 May 2019
Waihi weather station data now available
2 May 2019
A new weather station has been installed at Fisher Road to support Waihi growers. The station was installed by Hortplus and extends the network of weather stations across the country. Waihi growers...
Waihi weather station data now available
2 May 2019

A new weather station has been installed at Fisher Road to support Waihi growers.

The station was installed by Hortplus and extends the network of weather stations across the country.

Waihi growers can now receive tailored weather and Psa risk data for their region by using the Psa Risk Model on the KVH website, with access also available to other tools including the growing degree day calculator, chill unit calculator, hourly and daily weather data, and weather forecasting.

KVH thanks Hortplus for the installation of this weather station. Thanks also go to those who helped to source a suitable location - in particular, the grower now hosting this very valuable addition to the Psa Risk Model network.

Growers can register online to use the model if they don’t currently have a login, or email info@kvh.org.nz for more information.  

Biosecurity News
2 May 2019
Psa protection for harvested and development blocks important
2 May 2019
An observant Northland grower forwarded this image (right) to KVH from his new development block, showing Psa exudate developing on the underside of spotted Bruno leaves. The block had developed...
Psa protection for harvested and development blocks important
2 May 2019

An observant Northland grower forwarded this image (right) to KVH from his new development block, showing Psa exudate developing on the underside of spotted Bruno leaves.

The block had developed some leaf spot symptoms in late spring, following a period of high winds and rain, but new leaders and laterals established throughout summer had remained clear of infection. This recent reactivation of Psa on the edge of leaf spots illustrates how Psa multiplication is favoured as temperatures drop through autumn, and an immediate application of winter rate copper was recommended to avoid infection spread.

Growers and outdoor nurseries are reminded to stay focused on protecting young rootstock and replacement plants through autumn as these are most vulnerable to Psa infection. Winter rate copper is recommended and additionally the biologicals Kiwivax (applied as a soil drench) and Botryzen are suited to autumn use. Refer to the KVH recommended product list.

Also apply copper to mature blocks immediately after harvest to protect fruit stalks and leaf scars. The Psa risk model currently predicts a good spray window available through to early next week for most regions. 

Biosecurity News
2 May 2019
New fruit fly detection
2 May 2019
Controls on the movement of fruit and vegetables in the Auckland suburb of Northcote have been reintroduced following the detection of a further Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF). The single male fruit...
New fruit fly detection
2 May 2019

Controls on the movement of fruit and vegetables in the Auckland suburb of Northcote have been reintroduced following the detection of a further Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF).

The single male fruit fly was found late last week in one of the network of traps which remained in place following the discovery of six other fruit flies in the area in February/March.


This latest fly showed indications it was relatively elderly for a QFF, suggesting it may be from the same group as the earlier detections. There is no evidence of a breeding population.

While it is disappointing there has been another detection it does demonstrate that the trapping and surveillance systems in place are working.

Activity has increased in the reinstated Controlled Area Zone, including extended trapping and the collection of fallen fruit, as well as the return of signage and wheelie bins for residential fruit disposal. Detailed maps of the controlled areas and a full description of the boundaries and rules are available on the
Biosecurity New Zealand website.

Kiwifruit growers should talk to their post-harvest providers if they have any questions about what the impacts to them might be due to movement controls or export restrictions.

If you require support you can contact NZKGI or 
visit their website to learn more about the support network available.

Summary of finds: Single male QFF have been found in separate surveillance traps in the Auckland North Shore suburbs of Devonport (one single fly) and Northcote (seven single flies over an extended period of time). Three Facialis flies have been found in Otara.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz