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Biosecurity News
2 May 2019
Waihi weather station data now available
2 May 2019
A new weather station has been installed at Fisher Road to support Waihi growers. The station was installed by Hortplus and extends the network of weather stations across the country. Waihi growers...
Waihi weather station data now available
2 May 2019

A new weather station has been installed at Fisher Road to support Waihi growers.

The station was installed by Hortplus and extends the network of weather stations across the country.

Waihi growers can now receive tailored weather and Psa risk data for their region by using the Psa Risk Model on the KVH website, with access also available to other tools including the growing degree day calculator, chill unit calculator, hourly and daily weather data, and weather forecasting.

KVH thanks Hortplus for the installation of this weather station. Thanks also go to those who helped to source a suitable location - in particular, the grower now hosting this very valuable addition to the Psa Risk Model network.

Growers can register online to use the model if they don’t currently have a login, or email info@kvh.org.nz for more information.  

Biosecurity News
2 May 2019
Psa protection for harvested and development blocks important
2 May 2019
An observant Northland grower forwarded this image (right) to KVH from his new development block, showing Psa exudate developing on the underside of spotted Bruno leaves. The block had developed...
Psa protection for harvested and development blocks important
2 May 2019

An observant Northland grower forwarded this image (right) to KVH from his new development block, showing Psa exudate developing on the underside of spotted Bruno leaves.

The block had developed some leaf spot symptoms in late spring, following a period of high winds and rain, but new leaders and laterals established throughout summer had remained clear of infection. This recent reactivation of Psa on the edge of leaf spots illustrates how Psa multiplication is favoured as temperatures drop through autumn, and an immediate application of winter rate copper was recommended to avoid infection spread.

Growers and outdoor nurseries are reminded to stay focused on protecting young rootstock and replacement plants through autumn as these are most vulnerable to Psa infection. Winter rate copper is recommended and additionally the biologicals Kiwivax (applied as a soil drench) and Botryzen are suited to autumn use. Refer to the KVH recommended product list.

Also apply copper to mature blocks immediately after harvest to protect fruit stalks and leaf scars. The Psa risk model currently predicts a good spray window available through to early next week for most regions. 

Biosecurity News
2 May 2019
New fruit fly detection
2 May 2019
Controls on the movement of fruit and vegetables in the Auckland suburb of Northcote have been reintroduced following the detection of a further Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF). The single male fruit...
New fruit fly detection
2 May 2019

Controls on the movement of fruit and vegetables in the Auckland suburb of Northcote have been reintroduced following the detection of a further Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF).

The single male fruit fly was found late last week in one of the network of traps which remained in place following the discovery of six other fruit flies in the area in February/March.


This latest fly showed indications it was relatively elderly for a QFF, suggesting it may be from the same group as the earlier detections. There is no evidence of a breeding population.

While it is disappointing there has been another detection it does demonstrate that the trapping and surveillance systems in place are working.

Activity has increased in the reinstated Controlled Area Zone, including extended trapping and the collection of fallen fruit, as well as the return of signage and wheelie bins for residential fruit disposal. Detailed maps of the controlled areas and a full description of the boundaries and rules are available on the
Biosecurity New Zealand website.

Kiwifruit growers should talk to their post-harvest providers if they have any questions about what the impacts to them might be due to movement controls or export restrictions.

If you require support you can contact NZKGI or 
visit their website to learn more about the support network available.

Summary of finds: Single male QFF have been found in separate surveillance traps in the Auckland North Shore suburbs of Devonport (one single fly) and Northcote (seven single flies over an extended period of time). Three Facialis flies have been found in Otara.

Company Notices
23 April 2019
Listen to the latest news
23 April 2019
Snapshot is the podcast from KVH. Every month the KVH team brings you a summary of recent news and activities, seasonal orchard management advice, feature pests to be on the lookout for, and...
Listen to the latest news
23 April 2019

Snapshot is the podcast from KVH.

Every month the KVH team brings you a summary of recent news and activities, seasonal orchard management advice, feature pests to be on the lookout for, and reminders of upcoming events. Sit back and enjoy the content, knowing you’ll never miss out on all the latest happenings.

The Snapshot is free and available on SoundCloud or from Apple iTunes. Download the latest episode and subscribe today so that new episodes are automatically sent to you.

We hope you enjoy listening and look forward to your feedback.

 

Protocols & Movement Controls
18 April 2019
Budwood
18 April 2019
KVH has updated the KVH Protocol: Budwood which is now available on the KVH website. The movement of plant material such as budwood presents the greatest risk of spreading pathogens over long...
Budwood
18 April 2019

KVH has updated the KVH Protocol: Budwood which is now available on the KVH website.

The movement of plant material such as budwood presents the greatest risk of spreading pathogens over long distances. This is relevant to Psa, as well as other known (and unknown) pathogens that may be present in the plant. The best practice to reduce spread of pathogens is to source budwood from your own orchard for use on the same orchard. However, where this is not possible, the budwood protocol outlines the requirements to prevent spread of Psa under the National Psa-V Pest Management Plan (NPMP), and recommended practices to reduce the likelihood of spreading other pathogens.

Changes to the protocol have been highlighted in yellow and include the following;

  • Budwood must not be collected from material left on the ground after pruning.
  • The addition of recommended practices to manage risk of spreading pathogens:
  1. Monitoring vines throughout the year
  2. Tagging symptomatic vines so they can be avoided when collecting budwood - and avoiding any adjacent vines in any direction.
  3. Notifying KVH if a there is not an obvious cause for any unusual vine symptoms.

Biosecurity News
18 April 2019
Phytophthora workshop
18 April 2019
Phytophthora are a genus of pathogens responsible for some of the most significant biosecurity incursions around the world. They are the causal agent for numerous diseases, including Kauri dieback...
Phytophthora workshop
18 April 2019

Phytophthora are a genus of pathogens responsible for some of the most significant biosecurity incursions around the world. They are the causal agent for numerous diseases, including Kauri dieback disease. Phytophthora could have disastrous impacts on New Zealand’s horticulture, forestry and natural ecosystems. There are hundreds of Phytophthora species around the globe and new species are discovered all the time. The risk to our industry is largely unknown, but globally phytophthora risk is considered to be increasing.

Therefore, KVH and MPI are undertaking a joint readiness programme to consider how we should prepare for an incursion and how we would respond should this occur. To launch this preparedness for phytophthora, a workshop was held last week to brainstorm current knowledge, response scenarios and knowledge gaps to be filled by research.

The workshop was also attended by members of Zespri and Plant and Food Research and the outcomes will form the basis of a GIA readiness plan using a similar process to what we did previously for Brazilian wilt, Ceratocystis fimbriata.

Biosecurity News
18 April 2019
Reminder that footwear can spread pathogens
18 April 2019
 MPI’s Border Space newsletter contained a photo of dirty jandals that were presented at the border by a traveller who was entering New Zealand to work in horticulture. These jandals had...
Reminder that footwear can spread pathogens
18 April 2019

 MPI’s Border Space newsletter contained a photo of dirty jandals that were presented at the border by a traveller who was entering New Zealand to work in horticulture. These jandals had been used on a tomato farm in the Pacific Islands the previous day and could have contained various soil-borne pathogens. Fortunately, in this instance the traveller did the right thing and declared the dirty footwear to border staff upon arrival. The items were then cleaned appropriately.  

A previous study by AgResearch in 2010 demonstrated that a single gram of soil on an international aircraft traveller’s footwear had a greater than 50% chance of containing a regulated organism. With that in mind, the incident is a useful reminder that we ensure all visitors to our orchards enter with clean footwear, particularly if they have recently been overseas or to other regions of New Zealand.

Biosecurity News
18 April 2019
Auckland fruit fly response update
18 April 2019
The Queensland fruit fly was last detected in Northcote on 14 March. This find led to an increase in the on-the-ground operational response, including removal of fallen fruit from backyards,...
Auckland fruit fly response update
18 April 2019

The Queensland fruit fly was last detected in Northcote on 14 March. This find led to an increase in the on-the-ground operational response, including removal of fallen fruit from backyards, inspections of compost bins, and baiting in fruit trees to attract and kill adult flies, in particular females.

Movement restrictions for fruit and vegetables were lifted in Devonport on March 22 and Northcote on April 12.

Biosecurity New Zealand says: “All operational activities, including baiting, have been completed. However, as a precautionary measure, we will be keeping in place an enhanced network of fruit fly traps for an extended period. If fruit flies are present, these traps will detect them.” 

 

The latest fruit fly risk update has been published on the KVH website.

As well as the finds in Auckland, the fruit fly update details detections at the border, the national surveillance programme, and recent international responses to this unwanted pest.

KVH risk updates are published every month.

R&D News
18 April 2019
Final report - Nuffield Scholarship
18 April 2019
The final report covering KVH grower director Simon Cook’s Nuffield Scholarship research is available now. It covers the importance of on-farm biosecurity vigilance. Click here to read the...
Final report - Nuffield Scholarship
18 April 2019

The final report covering KVH grower director Simon Cook’s Nuffield Scholarship research is available now. It covers the importance of on-farm biosecurity vigilance. Click here to read the article. 

Grower News
18 April 2019
Transport of reject fruit
18 April 2019
 Although covering loads of reject fruit in a Recovery region is no longer a KVH requirement, the risk of loose plant material and fruit falling out during transit must still be managed. Plant...
Transport of reject fruit
18 April 2019

 Although covering loads of reject fruit in a Recovery region is no longer a KVH requirement, the risk of loose plant material and fruit falling out during transit must still be managed. Plant material present the highest risk of spreading Psa and other pathogens, and fruit lost in transit could possibly contribute to the development of wild kiwifruit plantings if seed  germinates.

The truck in this photo was observed travelling on the main road with a fairly high load of reject kiwifruit and had kiwifruit leaf material flying out (see circled area, indicating one of a number of leaves observed falling from the load). Bins of reject fruit should be checked to ensure there is no obvious plant material in them and trucks should be loaded so that fruit cannot be lost in transit. Please could all post-harvest and trucking contractors ensure that loads of fruit for stock feed (and being transported to kiwifruit processors) are managed appropriately to avoid a return to compulsory covering of loads.

Biosecurity News
18 April 2019
Consultations on import standards
18 April 2019
KVH continues to advocate strongly on behalf of the industry for strict biosecurity border controls. We back proposed Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) changes to rules for vehicles and sea...
Consultations on import standards
18 April 2019

KVH continues to advocate strongly on behalf of the industry for strict biosecurity border controls. We back proposed Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) changes to rules for vehicles and sea containers, which will make it harder for the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) to make its way across our borders.

MPI is currently consulting on two recently-reviewed Import Health Standards (IHS) – one for the import of vehicles, machinery, and equipment; and the other for the import of sea containers.

Proposed changes include extending the list of countries that have requirements to treat vehicles, machinery and equipment imports before they arrive in New Zealand. At present, 18 countries have pre-treatment requirements. The proposed new list will increase to 33 countries.

All imported cargo related to vehicles will need to be treated offshore, including sea containers. In the past, only uncontainerised cargo required treatment before arrival.

MPI also intends to refine some of the offshore management requirements under the existing import standard for vehicles and has worked with the Australian Department of Agriculture and Water Resources to align measures, making it easier for traders and shippers to comply.

KVH will be making submissions on behalf of the kiwifruit industry, supporting increased measures to protect our industry. Growers are also able to make their own submissions.

The consultations run through to Monday 3 June. Click here to read more about proposed changes relating to vehicles, machinery, and equipment. Click here to read more about proposed changes to the import of sea containers.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz