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Biosecurity News
7 February 2019
Prevent pampas from flowering NOW
7 February 2019
The invasive South American plant, pampas, will very shortly be sending up flower heads.  Pampas flowers in late summer and autumn months and can be a significant problem for kiwifruit crops, in...
Prevent pampas from flowering NOW
7 February 2019

The invasive South American plant, pampas, will very shortly be sending up flower heads.  Pampas flowers in late summer and autumn months and can be a significant problem for kiwifruit crops, in that the thousands of fine, wind-blown seeds produced from each flower head can attach to fruit.  This seed contaminant is a reject factor and may prevent fruit access to some overseas markets.  Ensure that any pampas plants adjacent or near a kiwifruit orchard are destroyed.  There was a huge spike in the number of pampas seed detections on kiwifruit last packing season.

Refer to this previous Bulletin article for information on controlling pampas and identifying differences between South American pampas and the native toetoe.  

Company Notices
7 February 2019
New biosecurity advisor: Erin Lane
7 February 2019
KVH is pleased to announce the appointment of Erin Lane as Biosecurity Advisor. Erin comes to KVH from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) where she held various roles over her seven years...
New biosecurity advisor: Erin Lane
7 February 2019

KVH is pleased to announce the appointment of Erin Lane as Biosecurity Advisor.

Erin comes to KVH from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) where she held various roles over her seven years there. She began as a Quarantine Officer in Auckland, working at the port, airport, mail centre and transitional facilities inspecting and clearing imported goods. Erin also worked as an Incursion Investigator, an Adviser in the Readiness and Response team, and an Adviser in the Regulation area, working specifically on Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) regulation.

Most recently, Erin has worked in Japan with the vehicle industry on educating and promoting better biosecurity practices, and more specifically, BMSB management across their supply chain to ensure that the risk posed by this unwanted pest remains offshore.

Erin brings with her biosecurity expertise and experience, with a sound understanding of biosecurity policy, standard setting and risk analysis. In her role at KVH, she will be focussing on maintaining accurate and up to date pest lists to help prioritise readiness efforts. She will be working closely with growers and the wider kiwifruit industry to ensure awareness of biosecurity threats, to support the industry to manage any biosecurity risks, and to help increase the industry’s level of overall biosecurity preparedness.

Biosecurity News
7 February 2019
Fight against devastating disease begins
7 February 2019
New Zealand’s horticulture and wine industry groups have been awarded a Sustainable Farming Fund (SFF) grant to progress research into an invasive and unwanted plant pathogen spreading...
Fight against devastating disease begins
7 February 2019

New Zealand’s horticulture and wine industry groups have been awarded a Sustainable Farming Fund (SFF) grant to progress research into an invasive and unwanted plant pathogen spreading overseas. 

Xylella fastidiosa, currently leaving its mark across Europe and the USA, could have devastating consequences for many horticultural industries, New Zealand’s culturally important plants and private gardeners should it arrive here. 

While kiwifruit is not a reported host of Xylella, KVH is supporting this research effort to give us greater certainty of our status and increase our level of preparedness.

The SFF project proposes a phased approach to better identify the risks posed by the pathogen to New Zealand’s primary industries and enable development of a cross-sector approach to preparation and response should it be found in New Zealand.

During the first phase known and potential impacts on a range of New Zealand’s crop and significant taonga species will be identified, as well as insects with the potential to vector spread.  Phase 2 will focus on education and awareness to highlight findings and their implications. Phase 3 will then focus on developing research priorities to be progressed through a cross sector Operational Agreement for the pathogen under the Government Industry Agreement for biosecurity readiness and response (GIA).

The project is likely to begin early this year and will be completed within 12 months.

The Xylella Action Group was formed in early 2018 under the framework provided by GIA. Membership comprises representatives from many industry groups and organisations including KVH, NZ Apples and Pears, NZ Avocado, B3, Dairy NZ, GIA, HortNZ, MPI, New Zealand Citrus Growers, NZPPI, New Zealand Winegrowers, Summerfruit NZ, Te Tira Whakamātaki, TomatoesNZ and Zespri.

Image: Olive trees in Italy, hundreds of years old, dying from Xylella fastidiosa (National Geographic website). 

Biosecurity News
7 February 2019
Lessons from offhsore in BMSB management
7 February 2019
While Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is not established in New Zealand, our focus is on preventing it arriving here and acting swiftly to eradicate it should it be detected. However, KVH and...
Lessons from offhsore in BMSB management
7 February 2019

While Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is not established in New Zealand, our focus is on preventing it arriving here and acting swiftly to eradicate it should it be detected. However, KVH and Zespri are also preparing for how the pest would be managed within kiwifruit orchards if it were to establish here.

As part of these preparedness efforts Zespri recently organised a global BMSB teleconference to hear about impacts, management approaches and research efforts across global production areas. Updates were provided from Italy, China, France, USA, and a research update from New Zealand.

In Italy, BMSB has been present since 2012 but is so far restricted to northern areas. Damage to horticulture has been reported since 2015 with peak damage to kiwifruit production being July and August (leading up to harvest). Bugs are typically found in the morning, at the top of vines, near orchard borders. Growers are setting up nets on the borders of their orchards, using hail nets above and on the sides. This type of netting is considered cheap and relatively effective in reducing impacts to crops, but not eliminating damage altogether as the smaller BMSB nymphs (but not adults) are still able to enter through the mesh. Some growers are experimenting with smaller 2.2mm mesh to provide greater exclusion at keeping the bugs out. Studies are underway in Italy to better understand the use of trap crops, and whether a certain combination of sacrificial crops grown in close proximity to kiwifruit can provide a window of protection until kiwifruit are harvested.

In China, BMSB populations are at their peak just before harvest, as has been noted in Italy. Other research projects underway here have confirmed BMSB has an impact on storage quality as fruit softens more quickly, and orchards with the worst damage need to remove fruit from coolstore earlier as storage life is shortened.

In France, BMSB has only recently been detected in 2018, but already impacts to horticulture are being observed. The use of hail netting around French orchards is now considered best practice, with insect proof netting even better if possible. Researchers have compared Rescue (reusable hanging lure) and Fisher (pyramid shaped lure that sits on the ground) pheromone traps and found that the Rescue type seems to do better with catches peaking in August - in line with general population peak - for both adults and juveniles.

In the USA, a gold kiwifruit grower based in Alabama estimated that fruit loss attributed to BMSB may have been around 50%. Again, numbers of the bug peaked just before harvest (August and September). Traps have been used and caught up to 100 bugs a week. The grower has experimented with trap crops (sorghum, sunflower, corn, soybean, cotton) as well as gardens around the crops. All have shown some potential, but none have successfully controlled BMSB numbers. Chemical trials of products permitted for use on kiwifruit have demonstrated a limited effect.

KVH and Zespri will continue to get updates from across global production areas and share information with growers so that as an industry, we can implement practices that will reduce impacts in the event of a BMSB population being found in New Zealand.

BMSB is the current focus of many research projects within our Kiwifruit Biosecurity Research Portfolio and amongst aligned research providers. At a national level under the BMSB Council (with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI)) this is mostly focused on improving preparedness for a response to increase the likelihood of eradicating this pest, or reducing numbers to a level that will reduce subsequent impacts to New Zealand.

Company Notices
7 February 2019
Support talented young horticulturalists
7 February 2019
Head along to the Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition at the Te Puke A&P Show this weekend in support of the up-and-coming horticulturalists vying for the title. Eight competitors,...
Support talented young horticulturalists
7 February 2019

Head along to the Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition at the Te Puke A&P Show this weekend in support of the up-and-coming horticulturalists vying for the title.

Eight competitors, known for their passion for the industry and exciting futures, will battle it out in a series of theoretical and practical horticultural activities designed to test contestants in a competitive, fast-paced environment. There will also be a biosecurity quiz round run by KVH who will be at the A&P Show all day on Saturday to answer any questions you may have about the work we’re doing to keep unwanted pests and diseases from establishing within our kiwifruit orchards and communities.

Company Notices
7 February 2019
Listen to the latest news
7 February 2019
The January Snapshot podcast is now online and features a round-up with Mark Whitworth, Cargo Services Manager at the Port of Tauranga. This episode covers the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) find...
Listen to the latest news
7 February 2019

The January Snapshot podcast is now online and features a round-up with Mark Whitworth, Cargo Services Manager at the Port of Tauranga. This episode covers the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) find in Mount Maunganui just before Christmas and what KVH, alongside the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and the Port of Tauranga do to keep risk at bay, particularly in terms of arriving cargo and cruise passengers.

The Snapshot podcasts are free and available now on SoundCloud or from Apple iTunes.

Biosecurity News
24 January 2019
Single BMSB detections
24 January 2019
Over the Christmas period there were two instances of single Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) discoveries post-border, highlighting how close to home the risk to our orchards, businesses, and...
Single BMSB detections
24 January 2019

Over the Christmas period there were two instances of single Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) discoveries post-border, highlighting how close to home the risk to our orchards, businesses, and lifestyles is.

A single male BMSB was found inside a Mt Maunganui house in mid-December and reported to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) biosecurity hotline. The area where it was found has been inspected and traps were set prior to Christmas. The traps have been checked multiple times and fortunately no more stink bugs have been found.

In early January, another BMSB was found in Glenfield, Auckland. As was the case in Mt Maunganui, it’s not known where the stink bug came from and MPI inquiries are continuing to try to determine a pathway. The area has been inspected, including with the use of the BMSB detector dog, and traps have been set to determine whether this was a single hitchhiker.

After both detections MPI officials have visited and inspected local transitional facilities, undertaken maildrops to homes in the area to raise awareness of the risk, and KVH and other horticultural industry groups have worked together to do more advertising about the importance of being on the lookout (and reporting) for these unwanted bugs.

To date there is no evidence of an established BMSB population, or that the two detections are related to each other. The summer months are the peak season for BMSB interceptions in New Zealand and we continue to see a high number of these at our border from Northern Hemisphere countries.

Please keep a lookout for any BMSB. If you think you’ve seen this insect, catch it and call MPI on 0800 80 99 66. For more information:

·         visit the BMSB page on the KVH website

·         look at the BMSB fact sheet for images that help with identification of BMSB

·         watch a short video about the damage BMSB can do.

Also, latest border interception information on BMSB has been published in the KVH risk update, showing that since the start of the high-risk season in September 2018 there have been 165 live BMSB finds (as at the time of the report being produced at the end of last week), most of which have been found in personal effects and goods originating in the USA, Italy and China.

KVH
will keep growers updated with any new information about these detections as investigations continue. You can read more extensive details KVH released at the time of each detection online here.

Biosecurity News
24 January 2019
Minister thanks Mount locals
24 January 2019
Minister for Biosecurity, Hon Damien O’Connor was in Mount Maunganui earlier today meeting staff who have been involved in the investigation into the December Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB)...
Minister thanks Mount locals
24 January 2019

Minister for Biosecurity, Hon Damien O’Connor was in Mount Maunganui earlier today meeting staff who have been involved in the investigation into the December Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) detection.

Minister O’Connor met Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) staff, agriculture and port representatives and Government Industry Agreement (GIA) partners, including KVH staff this morning to show his thanks for the trapping, surveillance, and public awareness work that was undertaken by the team over the Christmas period.

The Minister made particular note of how well the region has been working as one co-ordinated group, on behalf of all New Zealand, not just during this BMSB investigation but also with the adoption of the Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital initiative.

The group then travelled together to a local reserve for a BMSB trapping and clearance demonstration, accompanied by local media to help raise awareness of the difference the public can make and the important role they play in being on the lookout and reporting anything unusual. 

Biosecurity News
24 January 2019
Fruit fly interceptions
24 January 2019
Latest border interception information on fruit flies has been published in the KVH risk update, showing that one of our biggest threats – the Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) – was intercepted...
Fruit fly interceptions
24 January 2019

Latest border interception information on fruit flies has been published in the KVH risk update, showing that one of our biggest threats – the Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) – was intercepted at the border in December. This is the only QFF find since the start of the high-risk season in September 2018.

The new risk update also details the national fruit fly surveillance programme, which involves almost 8,000 pheromone traps checked on a fortnightly basis.

There were several fruit fly interceptions at the border over the summer period last year. Be vigilant and keep watch. While it may be possible to find on fruit trees if present, a better option is to look out for any larvae in fruit, including tree fallen fruit. Report any possible finds to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) biosecurity hotline on 0800 80 99 66. 

Biosecurity News
24 January 2019
Reminder to report unusual symptoms
24 January 2019
KVH reminds growers to report any unusual symptoms they see on their orchard. This is so we can investigate and take necessary action to minimise potential impacts to your investment, or the wider...
Reminder to report unusual symptoms
24 January 2019

KVH reminds growers to report any unusual symptoms they see on their orchard. This is so we can investigate and take necessary action to minimise potential impacts to your investment, or the wider industry. In most instances early action is the easiest way to mitigate impacts.

In 2018 KVH began investigating a group of unusual symptoms on some South Island orchards which were reportedly getting worse from one year to the next. Symptoms include cankers, some scion collapse and some dead vines on the worst sites. Sampling and diagnostics have been undertaken - this is not Psa and there is no evidence to suggest these symptoms are associated with a new biosecurity incursion.

However, a fungal organism has been isolated in association with these cankers on numerous occasions, but it is unknown what specific role it plays in the development of the symptoms. At this stage we know the organism has been present in New Zealand for at least five years (but likely much longer as previous technology was unable to differentiate it from other closely related species known to be present in New Zealand for a long time).



KVH is working with local growers, Plant and Food Research and AgFirst to better understand the cause of these symptoms, their distribution across the region and best practice advice for on-orchard management. A grower meeting was held before Christmas to share this information and hear more about what growers are seeing. Growers have also been monitoring their orchards for the presence of cankers or other unusual symptoms and reporting these to KVH.

All growers are encouraged to regularly monitor their orchards and report any symptoms that are out of the ordinary or becoming progressively worse.

Biosecurity News
24 January 2019
Myrtle rust risk still high
24 January 2019
Remember to check myrtle rust plants this summer to help track the spread of the disease. Myrtle rust is likely to be more active during warmer weather and is likely to spread to new areas where it...
Myrtle rust risk still high
24 January 2019

Remember to check myrtle rust plants this summer to help track the spread of the disease. Myrtle rust is likely to be more active during warmer weather and is likely to spread to new areas where it hasn't been seen before.

New Zealand's precious native myrtle plants including pōhutukawa, rātā, mānuka, kānuka and ramarama are vulnerable to the disease. The fungus, which is mainly spread by wind, generally infects shoots, buds, and young leaves of myrtle plants. Infected plants show typical symptoms including bright yellow powdery spots on the underside of leaves.

If you think you see symptoms of myrtle rust remember to not touch the plant or collect samples but take pictures and report it to Biosecurity New Zealand on 0800 80 99 66.

As of December 2018, the disease has been confirmed on more than 800 properties across most of the North Island and upper areas of the South Island. The Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, and Auckland are the most seriously affected areas.

Biosecurity New Zealand and the Department of Conservation (DOC) are currently working in partnership to identify ways to best manage the disease and support the health of our myrtles in the future. In the meantime, it is important to understand where the rust has spread to, what plants it is affecting (especially new ones) and where it is active.

A map of areas where myrtle rust has been found in New Zealand and resources on what to look for, what to do if you find myrtle rust and how to manage it are available on the Biosecurity New Zealand website.

Biosecurity News
24 January 2019
Promoting biosecurity across the Bay of Plenty
24 January 2019
Two videos have ben produced by the Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) team, to raise awareness as to how forest users can help keep kauri dieback from entering the forests of the Bay of...
Promoting biosecurity across the Bay of Plenty
24 January 2019

Two videos have ben produced by the Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) team, to raise awareness as to how forest users can help keep kauri dieback from entering the forests of the Bay of Plenty.

The videos are around a minute long and include dramatic and majestic visuals of kauri and the way people can protect this national treasure. Local talent, including mana whenua, talk about the desired biosecurity behaviours we want to see from everyone - “scrub, spray, stay” (clean off footwear, use disinfectant, stay on track). All Black Joe Webber and his son Kian Webber are featuring in one of the videos – they were strongly supportive of the biosecurity kauri dieback kaupapa and keen to get involved.

This messaging is in line with the national kauri dieback programme and Ko Tatou This Is Us, encouraging everyone to play a part in protecting the things we hold near and dear, and being an active member of the 4.7 million biosecurity team.

KVH, and other TMBC partners are sharing the videos on websites and social media channels, and if you’re at any Bay of Plenty movie theatres you may also see one of the videos pop up as part of the pre-show advertising.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz