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Company Notices
16 May 2019
KVH AGM
16 May 2019
KVH’s Annual General Meeting (AGM) will take place at 9am on Wednesday 24 July 2019, at the Trustpower Arena in Mount Maunganui. Growers will receive their AGM packs in the mail during the...
KVH AGM
16 May 2019

KVH’s Annual General Meeting (AGM) will take place at 9am on Wednesday 24 July 2019, at the Trustpower Arena in Mount Maunganui.

Growers will receive their AGM packs in the mail during the first week of July. This will include the Chairman’s Report, 2018 KVH audited financial statements, the proposed budget for the 2020/21 financial year, and voting information.

This is a public meeting and anyone who is interested is most welcome to attend.

The NZKGI and Zespri AGMs will follow immediately afterwards.

Protocols & Movement Controls
16 May 2019
Budwood registration and supply
16 May 2019
KVH best practice advice is to source budwood from your own orchard wherever possible to reduce the likelihood of spreading Psa or other pathogens. If this is not possible, the growers who are...
Budwood registration and supply
16 May 2019

KVH best practice advice is to source budwood from your own orchard wherever possible to reduce the likelihood of spreading Psa or other pathogens.

If this is not possible, the growers who are supplying budwood off their orchard need to register annually with KVH and complete a Budwood Risk Management Plan.

Requirements for budwood suppliers are detailed in the KVH Protocol: Budwood, and include a requirement to monitor the budwood collection area and tag any vines that are showing any symptoms or are not healthy.

Budwood should not be collected from material left on the ground after pruning as this may mean that wood from unhealthy vines is distributed to other orchards, resulting in disease transfer.

It is important to maintain traceability - growers need to record all material moving off and onto their orchard. This will help with disease or pest containment in the event of a new incursion.  

Protocols & Movement Controls
16 May 2019
Movement of mature plants
16 May 2019
Growers may wish to move mature kiwifruit plants from areas where they have double planted. The movement of plant material is considered a high-risk pathway for the transmission of unwanted...
Movement of mature plants
16 May 2019

Growers may wish to move mature kiwifruit plants from areas where they have double planted.

The movement of plant material is considered a high-risk pathway for the transmission of unwanted organisms and therefore it is important that any such movements are given careful consideration and that appropriate measures are implemented to mitigate risk.

Please contact KVH (0800 665 825 or info@kvh.org.nz) well in advance if you wish to move any mature kiwifruit vines between properties.

Biosecurity News
16 May 2019
Stinky pest thwarted
16 May 2019
The BMSB Council (a group of horticulture-wide organisations who have come together to help stop the damaging hitchhiker making a home here) have reminded the public of the production and lifestyle...
Stinky pest thwarted
16 May 2019

The BMSB Council (a group of horticulture-wide organisations who have come together to help stop the damaging hitchhiker making a home here) have reminded the public of the production and lifestyle impacts of BMSB and the work being done to keep it from establishing here.

The Council – which includes KVH – released a media statement outlining the significant progress industry groups and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) have made towards mitigating the potential catastrophic damage of a BMSB incursion, reminding people to be on the lookout over the winter months, and encouraging public reports of anything unusual.

Read the release here. 

Biosecurity News
16 May 2019
Snakes on a plane: flying snake, live python caught at border
16 May 2019
A flying snake and carpet python were among the rising number of reptiles that biosecurity staff seized at our borders. This included two of the world's most poisonous snakes – a tiger...
Snakes on a plane: flying snake, live python caught at border
16 May 2019

A flying snake and carpet python were among the rising number of reptiles that biosecurity staff seized at our borders. This included two of the world's most poisonous snakes – a tiger snake and a banded sea krait – along with different species of lizards and a turtle. Read more.

Biosecurity News
16 May 2019
Step-up in Northcote fruit fly response
16 May 2019
On Saturday it was announced another Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) has been found within the current Northcote controlled area, bringing the total to eight over the past three and half...
Step-up in Northcote fruit fly response
16 May 2019

On Saturday it was announced another Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) has been found within the current Northcote controlled area, bringing the total to eight over the past three and half months.

Biosecurity New Zealand is stepping up on the ground efforts in the suburb, including placing bait on fruit trees to attract and kill adult flies, in particular females. The current restrictions on the movement of fruit and vegetables remain in place and trapping and the collection of fallen fruit in some of the controlled area will continue.


While it is concerning there has been another detection, it still doesn’t tell us that there is a breeding population. What it does is raises the potential that QFF remain in the area, albeit at very low levels.

KVH continues to be closely involved in the running of the response as a member of the decision-making Governance Group, and as an industry we continue to help with on the ground activities via the KiwiNet group.

Read the full announcement from Saturday here.

Biosecurity News
16 May 2019
Remove unpicked kiwifruit from vines
16 May 2019
Growers are reminded that unpicked kiwifruit must be removed from vines by 1 July. Unpicked fruit can increase the amount of wild kiwifruit plants establishing in nearby areas of native bush or...
Remove unpicked kiwifruit from vines
16 May 2019

Growers are reminded that unpicked kiwifruit must be removed from vines by 1 July.

Unpicked fruit can increase the amount of wild kiwifruit plants establishing in nearby areas of native bush or forestry as fruit ripening over the winter months provides a food source for birds. Birds spread seed through their droppings, together with a small fertiliser package. A proportion of this seed can readily germinate.

Unmanaged kiwifruit vines, including those with unpicked fruit, may also be a potential host for plant disease organisms.

Unpicked fruit needs to be dropped to the ground and mulched. This prevents mass-feeding by birds over an extended period.

Under the National Psa Pest Management Plan (NPMP) it is a requirement to remove all unpicked fruit from vines by 1 July each year.  After this date KVH will follow-up reports of unpicked fruit with orchard owners and post-harvest companies.

Biosecurity News
16 May 2019
Psa protection
16 May 2019
The Psa Risk Model predicts low-risk weather for most regions into next week, providing growers with a great opportunity to apply all-important post-harvest coppers. Where there is no risk of...
Psa protection
16 May 2019

The Psa Risk Model predicts low-risk weather for most regions into next week, providing growers with a great opportunity to apply all-important post-harvest coppers.

Where there is no risk of drift to unharvested blocks, Actigard should also be applied to strengthen protection into the leaf-fall period. Most canopies are still in good condition with ample green leaves to absorb Actigard (see image below) but the window of opportunity for this product will close as leaves deteriorate and more frosts occur.
 



Advice is to also monitor blocks for evidence of Psa and check young plants and girdled vines for evidence of Psa symptoms. Focus on more Psa prone areas of the orchard first, and mark affected vines to prompt the removal of infections through winter. Flag possible hot spot areas and use this information to create winter pruning strategies, and spring monitoring.


KVH has this week received calls from growers who are seeing red exudate on girdles indicating Psa risk is still out there. Good proactive management will minimise orchard risk going forward.

R&D News
16 May 2019
New research published
16 May 2019
Scientific research publications that drive KVH policies and management advice are added to our website as they are finalised. Growers are encouraged to look them up and have a browse of the many...
New research published
16 May 2019

Scientific research publications that drive KVH policies and management advice are added to our website as they are finalised. Growers are encouraged to look them up and have a browse of the many different reports we make available.

Over recent weeks the following reports have been added:

·         Advancing EMix: The efficacy of Emix against Psa is dose dependent, withe results in this study showing that higher concentrations of Emix are required to control Psa in more complex environments.

·         Pest reviews: looking at the biology, distribution, impacts and management of Spotted Lanternfly, South American fruit fly, BMSB, Fruit piercing moth, and White Peach Scale. Reviews also provided information of potential control options for kiwifruit growers in New Zealand.

Company Notices
16 May 2019
Nominations for KVH Directors
16 May 2019
The KVH Board is calling for nominations for one grower director for a term of three years to the KVH Board. Nomination forms can be downloaded from the KVH website here and must be returned to...
Nominations for KVH Directors
16 May 2019

The KVH Board is calling for nominations for one grower director for a term of three years to the KVH Board.

Nomination forms can be downloaded from the KVH website here and must be returned to KVH by 5pm Thursday 13 June 2019.

Current KVH Board member, Grower Representative Dermott Malley (who was voted in at least years AGM for a one-year term) is re-standing for election.

Grower members will be asked to vote for their preferred nominee and the successful candidate will be announced following the upcoming AGM on
Wednesday 24 July 2019

Media Releases
11 May 2019
Auckland fruit fly detections
11 May 2019
Another Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) has been found within the current Northcote controlled area, bringing the total to eight over the past three and half months. Biosecurity New Zealand is stepping...
Auckland fruit fly detections
11 May 2019

Another Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) has been found within the current Northcote controlled area, bringing the total to eight over the past three and half months.

Biosecurity New Zealand is stepping up on the ground efforts in the suburb, and will begin placing bait on fruit trees to attract and kill adult flies, in particular females. The current restrictions on the movement of fruit and vegetables remain in place, and trapping and the collection of fallen fruit in some of the controlled area will continue.

While it is concerning there has been another detection, it still doesn’t tell us that there is a breeding population. What it does is raises the potential that QFF remain in the area, albeit at very low levels.

The latest finds will mean an expansion of the B Zone in Northcote; and the establishment of a new A Zone with a radius of 200m around the new detection, along with the associated restrictions on the movement of fruit, vegetables and green waste. The controlled area of 1.5 km will be expanded toward the west from the latest detection.

Teams on the ground will continue removing fallen fruit from backyards in the A zone, and placing bait on fruit trees. The bait is made up of a protein to attract adult fruit flies, and a very low concentration of insecticide to kill the flies. People living in the area will be given at least 24 hours’ notice that bait will be placed in their property and will provided with detailed information about the programme.

Details about the Controlled Area Notice: No fruit and vegetables (other than leafy or root vegetables and cooked, processed, preserved, dried, frozen and canned fruit) can be moved from Zone A of the controlled area. In addition, compost and green waste from gardens cannot be moved out of this Zone.

Residents in the A Zone are asked to avoid composting fruit and vegetables. For disposing of fruit and vegetable waste, they are encouraged to use a sink waste disposal unit if possible or bins provided by Biosecurity New Zealand. These bins will be delivered shortly and residents advised of their location.

For the B Zone – no fruit and vegetables grown in the Zone can be moved out of the controlled area. Produce that has been sourced commercially from outside the area can be moved.

People living in Northcote are urged to check if they are living in the Controlled Area Zones and what this means for them. They can do this on the Biosecurity New Zealand website.

Detailed maps of the controlled areas and a full description of the boundaries, and full information about the rules are also available on the Biosecurity New Zealand website.

Summary of finds: Single male QFF have been found in separate surveillance traps in the Auckland North Shore suburbs of Devonport (one single fly) and Northcote (eight single flies over an extended period of time). Three Facialis flies have been found in Otara.

Media Releases
7 May 2019
Stinky pest thwarted
7 May 2019
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one of the biggest risks facing New Zealand’s horticultural sector and outdoor way of life, says a group of horticulture-wide organisations who have...
Stinky pest thwarted
7 May 2019

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one of the biggest risks facing New Zealand’s horticultural sector and outdoor way of life, says a group of horticulture-wide organisations who have come together to help stop the damaging hitch-hiker making a home here.

Dr Ed Massey, Biosecurity and Emergency Response Manager for New Zealand Winegrowers and Chair of the BMSB Council says overseas this stinky pest has caused catastrophic damage in some areas where it has established.

“Although BMSB has managed to reach our shores in the past, it hasn’t found a foothold here. This is largely due to the increased awareness people across the country have to be on the lookout and report the unusual bug, combined with increased risk management measures and the vigilance of Biosecurity New Zealand’s border staff at the frontline.”

Backing this up are the increasingly combined efforts of Government and industry organisations who have come together to jointly prepare for and respond to the potential impacts of BMSB, says Ed.

In 2017 the BMSB Council was founded through the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for biosecurity readiness and response. The Council is responsible for ensuring New Zealand is collectively prepared to mitigate the risks posed by this pest.

“The stink bug could cause hundreds of millions of dollars of losses for our horticulture industry, as well as seriously damaging quality of life for all New Zealanders. There is heightened awareness of biosecurity risk across the country and our industry is more aware than ever that we cannot afford to ever be complacent."

“The most recent high-risk season for BMSB started in September 2018 and finished at the end of April. There have been more than 200 live BMSB found over that time and importantly, we’ve prevented them from establishing.”

“The finds have included a batch of live bugs that were discovered in a box of shoes bought online from overseas, finds onboard ships coming to our shores, and single bugs that were reported by residents in Mt Maunganui and Glenfield, Auckland.”

Ed adds that over the last year the BMSB Council has made significant progress towards mitigating the potential impact of a BMSB incursion.

“In August last year the Council successfully applied to the Environmental Protection Authority to release – with strict controls - a BMSB biocontrol in the event of an incursion. This was a major milestone and provides us with another weapon in our fight against the stink bug. We’re currently planning how we might use the wasp to ensure any future release is as effective as possible.”

“We’ve also had BMSB Council representatives recently in Tbilisi, Georgia – a country facing a disastrous BMSB outbreak - to learn more about potential management options.” 

In addition, the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has recently proposed amendments to relevant import regulations to further mitigate the risk of BMSB entering New Zealand from high-risk countries.

“The BMSB Council backs these moves to strengthen New Zealand’s biosecurity and ensure we are doing everything possible to continue to keep the pest at bay. There is always more we can learn but we are on the right track and confident that this year’s activities have improved our collective readiness for BMSB.”  

The strongest weapon in the nation’s fight against BMSB remains public awareness says Ed.

“In many countries, the winter months when the insects move inside homes to keep warm have been the time of year when new populations have been detected.  It can infest homes in the thousands and is almost impossible to get rid of.”

“Unlike fruit fly or other well-known pests that are associated with specific commodities, BMSB can be found on a wide range of imported goods and in travellers’ luggage as they arrive in New Zealand. The majority have been found on ships, mail packages and personal effects coming into the country.”

“This is why help from the public is so important and makes all the difference. We ask everyone to keep an eye out for this pest because it’s feasible that it might turn up in an overseas present or package, in the pocket of a jacket in a suitcase, or even any number of surprising places - BMSB is a seriously clever hitch-hiker.

If you think you have seen BMSB inside your home catch it; snap it; report it. Call the Biosecurity New Zealand hotline 0800 80 99 66 to report your find.

How to identify BMSB

There are currently other species of stink bugs found in New Zealand that could be confused with BMSB. Key distinguishing features of the adult BMSB are:

- It is about the size of a 10c coin and 14-17mm long.

- Look for black and white banding on the antennae and alternate black and white markings on the abdomen

Image: BMSB on the side of a building in Italy in autumn 2017. Credit: Udine Today.

 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

25 Miro St
Mount Maunganui
Tauranga 3116

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz