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Biosecurity News
30 April 2015
MPI launches NZ biosecurity reform project
30 April 2015
Last week the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) launched ‘Biosecurity 2025’ – a project to review and future-proof New Zealand’s biosecurity system and replace the current...
MPI launches NZ biosecurity reform project
30 April 2015

Last week the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) launched ‘Biosecurity 2025’ – a project to review and future-proof New Zealand’s biosecurity system and replace the current 2003 New Zealand Biosecurity Strategy.

MPI will be seeking feedback from biosecurity stakeholders, Māori and the public through a consultation process. To register your interest email biosecurity2025@mpi.govt.nz

KVH Chief Executive Barry O’Neil says: “we look forward to being actively involved in this project with MPI and engaging with industry to ensure the best possible outcome for the kiwifruit industry is achieved. The recent Queensland fruit fly response highlights the critical importance of an effective biosecurity system so this is an excellent opportunity for our industry to contribute to the new Directional Document which will shape New Zealand’s future biosecurity system.”

Growers are encouraged to find out more about the project on MPI’s website and email KVH with any queries or feedback.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications

Protocols & Movement Controls
30 April 2015
Waimea Nurseries join the KPCS
30 April 2015
Waimea Nurseries in Nelson has become the latest nursery to join the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) and is now selling KPCS certified kiwifruit plants. Purchasing certified kiwifruit...
Waimea Nurseries join the KPCS
30 April 2015

Waimea Nurseries in Nelson has become the latest nursery to join the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) and is now selling KPCS certified kiwifruit plants.

Purchasing certified kiwifruit plants mean growers have assurance they are investing in the best start for their plants.

To date, four nurseries located in Kerikeri, Gisborne, Motueka and Nelson, have joined the KPCS. These nurseries are identified on the KVH nursery list here.

Other nurseries have expressed strong interest in joining the scheme and are currently documenting how their operation addresses biosecurity risks, as required under the KPCS.

All nurseries selling and dispatching kiwifruit plants must be registered with KVH or be part of the KPCS.

From 1 October 2016, all kiwifruit plants for sale and distribution must be KPCS certified.

For more information, visit www.kvh.org.nz/kpcs.

Karyn Lowry, KVH Operations

 

R&D News
30 April 2015
Bi-monthly R&D update report: February/March update
30 April 2015
This bi-monthly report provides information about the progress over February and March 2015 for the Psa R&D programme. The following projects are summarised in the report: Elicitor potted...
Bi-monthly R&D update report: February/March update
30 April 2015

This bi-monthly report provides information about the progress over February and March 2015 for the Psa R&D programme. The following projects are summarised in the report:

  • Elicitor potted plant trial
  • Glasshouse trials
  • Green bud rot trial
  • Autumn spraying for protection from Psa (Gold kiwifruit)
  • Bud rot in Hayward and Green14

Click here to read the report.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications

Biosecurity News
30 April 2015
Investigation into an uncharacterised kiwifruit virus
30 April 2015
MPI, KVH and P&FR have been an investigating a virus discovered in kiwifruit seed imported through Post Entry Quarantine (PEQ). There is little known about the virus although it is not associated...
Investigation into an uncharacterised kiwifruit virus
30 April 2015

MPI, KVH and P&FR have been an investigating a virus discovered in kiwifruit seed imported through Post Entry Quarantine (PEQ). There is little known about the virus although it is not associated with any specific symptoms to kiwifruit vines.

The investigation has found that this uncharacterised Betaflexiviridae virus was present on multiple seed imports dating back as far as 1996 but is not widespread across the industry and has a limited distribution, but greater than what can be feasibly eradicated. Despite not being linked to disease, KVH and P&FR are taking a conservative approach and working to limit the spread of the virus.

Matt Dyck, KVH Biosecurity

Grower News
24 April 2015
Routine tests indicate streptomycin resistance in Psa-V on two Te Puke orchards
24 April 2015
Results from KVH’s regular testing programme have showed Psa-V resistance from samples in two Te Puke orchards. These finds were detected in the most recent round of an ongoing copper and...
Routine tests indicate streptomycin resistance in Psa-V on two Te Puke orchards
24 April 2015

Results from KVH’s regular testing programme have showed Psa-V resistance from samples in two Te Puke orchards.

These finds were detected in the most recent round of an ongoing copper and streptomycin resistance monitoring programme that has been in place since 2011. The programme’s aim is to ensure resistance is detected early. These results are not completely unexpected. 

The streptomycin resistant Psa-V is still susceptible to copper, meaning growers can still effectively control Psa-V.

Resistance to streptomycin can occur naturally, even on orchards where streptomycin has not been used. KVH and Zespri are working with relevant authorities to understand the implications of this result and other orchards in New Zealand could also have streptomycin resistance. There is no evidence to suggest the resistance has occurred due to inappropriate use of streptomycin.

Streptomycin use and resistance has previously been identified in other horticultural industries in NZ and successful management strategies have been developed to deal with this.

Streptomycin use not permitted at present
Industry use of streptomycin (registered and sold in NZ as KeyStrepto™) is not permitted at this time of year under Zespri’s Crop Protection Standard. KVH and Zespri are reviewing the kiwifruit industry use conditions of Streptomycin for the 2016 season and will notify the industry once this is confirmed in June.

Through the R&D and product testing programme Zespri and KVH are continuing to test and identify alternative and sustainable control approaches for Psa-V. Zespri has been developing options to reduce industry reliance on antibacterial products.

What is being done?
Both orchards have been working with KVH to ensure best practice resistance management is in place. This includes the application of copper spray, movement restrictions on plant material and a strong focus on orchard hygiene. Intensive sampling and testing of the two orchards and the surrounding orchards is underway. Further testing is also being carried out to establish the nature of resistance.

What can growers do?
KVH continues to recommend growers adhere to their orchard management plans, including a robust protective spray programme, orchard hygiene and the removal of infection from orchards as per KVH’s best practice advice through autumn. It is also very important to use protective spray products at label rates.

  • Continue to maintain a year-round comprehensive Psa-V management programme.
  • Maintain a protective spray programme throughout autumn. Ensure cover is in place prior to high risk weather.
  • Always use label rates.
  • Immediately after harvest, apply Actigard™ and copper – refer to the KVH Seasonal Management Guide www.kvh.org.nz/seasonal_advice
  • Ensure spray calibration is optimal to enhance coverage.
  • Remove and dispose of diseased material from the orchard to reduce build-up of inoculum. This also maximises the benefit of applied sprays.
  • Sanitise tools between vines.
  • Ensure strict orchard hygiene measures are in place during harvest to avoid the transfer of plant material within and between orchards. This includes:
  • Checking tractors, bin trailers and picking bags are clear of plant material and sanitised as required.
  • Ensuring all harvest bins are sanitised and clear of plant material.
  • Making sure clothing, and in particular headwear and footwear, are clear of plant material on entry to and exit from the property.
  • Ensure budwood and nursery stock comes from an approved source and is compliant with KVH movement controls.

Refer to the KVH Seasonal Management Guide at www.kvh.org.nz/seasonal_advice.

Kiwifruit growers who believe spraying is providing no control, and suspect resistance, should contact KVH on 0800 665 825 or email info@kvh.org.nz. KVH will then assess the situation and carry out additional testing for resistance as required.

Grower News
24 April 2015
Questions and Answers
24 April 2015
What is streptomycin? Streptomycin is an antibacterial product and has been registered for use against Psa-V in New Zealand since 2011. Antibacterial products are registered for use in Canada,...
Questions and Answers
24 April 2015

What is streptomycin?
Streptomycin is an antibacterial product and has been registered for use against Psa-V in New Zealand since 2011.

Antibacterial products are registered for use in Canada, United States, New Zealand and a number of Asian countries against a range of bacterial diseases in horticulture, including fire blight in apples and pears.

It is registered in New Zealand for use on apples, tomatoes, stonefruit and kiwifruit.

Why is it used in the NZ kiwifruit industry?
MPI granted a Limited Label Claim with strict use conditions for streptomycin for the control of Psa-V on kiwifruit vines.

Antibacterials are considered to be one of the most effective tools for managing Psa-V infection. For information on efficacy refer to: www.kvh.org.nz/product_testing_results.

How has resistance developed?
We are still investigating the exact nature of the resistance but this can occur naturally as a result of other bacteria “sharing” their DNA. 
Bacteria can also sometimes change genetically to resist protective products, meaning they are no longer effective against Psa-V. For more information refer to Plant & Food Research scientist Joel Vaneste’s technical presentation on KeyStrepto™ use and resistance on YouTube (link here).

Overseas experience has seen resistance develop in Pseudomonas sp. against both copper and antibacterials. Ceasing use of the product for a period of time is the key way of overcoming resistance.

Why did the NZ kiwifruit industry introduce streptomycin to the CPS if resistance has developed with its use in other industries?
When Psa-V was discovered in NZ, antibacterials were considered a necessary tool to help control Psa-V and allow commercial production to continue. Advice was provided to growers to limit the development of resistance through alternating protectant products, using recommended label rates, ensuring good spray coverage and maintaining orchard hygiene and removing infected material from orchards.

Will KeyStrepto™ be removed from the Zespri CPS?
KVH and Zespri are reviewing the ongoing kiwifruit industry use conditions of KeyStrepto™ in the Zespri Crop Protection Standard and industry will be advised once confirmed. We expect this decision to be made in June.

Is there another antibacterial growers could use instead?
Zespri is also reviewing the data on another antibacterial product Kasumin (active ingredient kasugamycin) to determine if it will be included in the 2016 Crop Protection Standard. This decision will be communicated to industry in June as well.

Can growers still use streptomycin?
Industry use of streptomycin is currently prohibited under Zespri’s Crop Protection Standard until its use conditions have been confirmed.

Zespri does not allow applications of KeyStrepto to fruit and has a zero-antibiotic residue policy underpinned by a 100 percent residue-testing programme of all orchards for antibacterial residues. All orchards are also subject to a multi-residue test, which tests for 300 active compounds. In the four years this testing programme has been in place, no antibacterial residues have been detected in crops.

What commitment is there to finding sustainable ways to manage Psa-V?
To date, more than $12m has been spent on a global research and development programme for Psa-V since it was detected in 2010; and a further $2m per year is committed to R&D into the future.

The R&D programme includes a product testing programme developed to identify, rigorously test and get permission to use suitable products to help manage and control the spread of Psa-V. To date, more than 300 products have been tested for efficacy against Psa-V in the KVH/Zespri product testing programme.

 

Biosecurity News
16 April 2015
Researching new tools for the battle against BMSB
16 April 2015
One of the challenges with BMSB is the lack of effective tools available to detect and control this organism. In comparison the tools available for fruit fly are far more advanced as research has...
Researching new tools for the battle against BMSB
16 April 2015

One of the challenges with BMSB is the lack of effective tools available to detect and control this organism. In comparison the tools available for fruit fly are far more advanced as research has been ongoing for a much longer period of time.

Last year in response to the emerging threat of BMSB, MPI and other GIA signatories developed a research plan to provide more tools in the battle against BMSB. The three themes where the research is directed are:

  1. prevent its entry;
  2. detect it early; and
  3. eradicate it if feasible and minimise the damage if the pest establishes.

Many of the research projects have been granted urgent priority status and link in to existing projects in the USA to deliver results as quickly as possible. Some projects have delivered results already. However, for others results will still be years away given the nature of the work.

In addition to this wider coordinated research approach, the kiwifruit industry is also undertaking research specific to our industry.

The impacts of BMSB on kiwifruit are unknown as there are few instances where invading BMSB populations overlap with kiwifruit production areas.
KVH has initiated discussions with Californian researchers to establish trials that will determine the impacts of BMSB on kiwifruit in both the laboratory and outdoor planted areas.

Matt Dyck, KVH Biosecurity

Biosecurity News
16 April 2015
Stink bug campaign raises public awareness
16 April 2015
A joint campaign between KVH, MPI and PipFruit NZ to raise public awareness of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) has resulted in several people contacting KVH with suspected sightings....
Stink bug campaign raises public awareness
16 April 2015

A joint campaign between KVH, MPI and PipFruit NZ to raise public awareness of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) has resulted in several people contacting KVH with suspected sightings. Thankfully, none of these have been confirmed as the BMSB. However, its encouraging people are proactively keeping an eye out for them.

Bay of Plenty media have also picked up on the campaign and run a story to help raise local awareness – click here.

The BMSB is very similar to stink bugs already common in New Zealand. A good resource comparing the BMSB with other common stink bugs can be found on the BMSB page on the MPI website here.

Keeping BMSB out of NZ remains a real challenge and success depends on our ability to detect it as early as possible.

Know what BMSB looks like and educate your friends and family. The key distinguishing features of the BMSB are:

  • Its size (14–17mm)
  • white banding on the antennae
  • alternate black and white markings on the abdomen.

If you think you have seen BMSB, catch it and call the MPI pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66.

Matt Dyck, KVH Biosecurity
 

Biosecurity News
16 April 2015
QFF - Australian home gardeners experience
16 April 2015
Its well-known the Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) is a significant threat to New Zealand’s horticultural industry. However, it would also be a huge problem for home and hobby gardeners who enjoy...
QFF - Australian home gardeners experience
16 April 2015

Its well-known the Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) is a significant threat to New Zealand’s horticultural industry. However, it would also be a huge problem for home and hobby gardeners who enjoy growing fruit for their own use.

Female QFFs lay eggs under the skin of ripening fruit. These eggs hatch into white maggots that live and feed in the fruit for 7-12 days causing the fruit to rot from the inside.

Home gardeners in Australia have been living with the fruit fly for many years. In most Australian states and territories, fruit fly control is now the responsibility of every backyard gardener. These ongoing controls can include sanitisation, spraying, baiting, trapping and covering plants and are costly in terms of time, money and effort.

The number of websites and Youtube clips dedicated to teaching backyard growers’ about best-practice management and controlling fruit fly is indicative of the problem it has become in Australia.

  • Click here to watch a short Youtube clip by a gardener showing a QFF laying eggs into a cucumber and the resulting damage to fruit.
  • Click here to see images of QFF affected fruit.

The QFF is described as the bane of Australian gardeners’ and growers’ lives and it’s in everyone’s best interest to keep it out of New Zealand.

Also see: www.preventfruitfly.com.au which is sponsored by the National Fruit Fly Strategy.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications

Biosecurity News
16 April 2015
Queensland fruit fly response - residents in for the long haul
16 April 2015
MPI confirmed last week the residents in the Grey Lynn controlled area are in for the long haul as the QFF response is likely to continue until at least November. To date, 14 adult flies have been...
Queensland fruit fly response - residents in for the long haul
16 April 2015

MPI confirmed last week the residents in the Grey Lynn controlled area are in for the long haul as the QFF response is likely to continue until at least November.

To date, 14 adult flies have been located and the last find was over a month ago on 6 March. The last detection of larvae in fruit collected from the affected area was on 13 March. While this is good news, it is still too early to confirm the flies are gone for good.

Response activities over winter
MPI expects to stop the baiting treatments in the Controlled Area sometime around early June, as fruit flies ‘hibernate’ during winter, and resume in the springtime to ensure all flies are eradicated. The surveillance traps will remain in place during winter, but will be checked less frequently.

During this time the controls on the movement of fruit and vegetables outside of the Controlled Area will continue to ensure any surviving flies are not spread from the area. MPI recently made it easier to comply with the rules by allowing customers to purchase fruit and vegetables at certain MPI-approved retailers within the Controlled Area that can be taken outside of the Controlled Area.

To keep up to date with information on the MPI website click here.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications

Company Notices
2 April 2015
Barry ONeil appointed on HortNZ Board
2 April 2015
KVH Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, has recently been appointed to the HortNZ Board as an Independent Director.  Barry has extensive biosecurity governance experience, including membership...
Barry ONeil appointed on HortNZ Board
2 April 2015

KVH Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, has recently been appointed to the HortNZ Board as an Independent Director.  Barry has extensive biosecurity governance experience, including membership of Australia’s National Biosecurity Committee and directorship of the New Zealand Bio-Protection Core and SCION.
 

Company Notices
2 April 2015
Vacancy: bin inspector for Franklin region
2 April 2015
KVH is looking for a person to inspect harvest bins at a Pukekohe packhouse to ensure they are free of leaf/plant material before they are delivered to Exclusion region orchards. Work is part-time...
Vacancy: bin inspector for Franklin region
2 April 2015

KVH is looking for a person to inspect harvest bins at a Pukekohe packhouse to ensure they are free of leaf/plant material before they are delivered to Exclusion region orchards.

Work is part-time and on an on-call basis throughout April and May.

For further details phone Karyn Lowry on 027 227 1157 or email karyn.lowry@kvh.org.nz

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Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz