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Company Notices
8 March 2018
Get your news from the KVH podcast
8 March 2018
The February Snapshot podcast is online summarising latest news and activities, seasonal orchard management advice, feature pests to be on the lookout for, and reminders of upcoming events....
Get your news from the KVH podcast
8 March 2018

The February Snapshot podcast is online summarising latest news and activities, seasonal orchard management advice, feature pests to be on the lookout for, and reminders of upcoming events. It’s free and available now on SoundCloud or from Apple iTunes.

We hope you enjoy listening and look forward to your feedback on this new channel of communication we’ve created to help make it easier for growers to stay up-to-date with the latest important news.

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
Top tips for harvest hygiene
8 March 2018
Harvest season presents a high-risk period for spreading Psa or other biosecurity risks between blocks, orchards and regions because of the numbers of vehicles, machinery and people movements...
Top tips for harvest hygiene
8 March 2018

Harvest season presents a high-risk period for spreading Psa or other biosecurity risks between blocks, orchards and regions because of the numbers of vehicles, machinery and people movements involved.

Growers are responsible for protecting their orchards, and others, by ensuring the movement of harvest equipment, people and bins onto and around their orchard is minimised.

Top tips for harvest hygiene preparation:

  • Clear loadout areas of weeds before harvest.
  • Clearly mark parking and hygiene control areas.
  • Allow only essential vehicles into the production area.
  • Limit access to established roads and tracks.
  • Make sure contractors and staff understand your hygiene requirements.
  • Check all equipment (harvest bins, harvest machinery, picking bags etc) coming on to your orchard is free of plant and soil material.
  • Ensure people check that clothing, particularly headwear and footwear, is free of plant material on entry and exit.
  • Do not allow workers to bring imported fruit onto the orchard.

With extra people through orchards more pairs of eyes can be on the lookout for unusual vine symptoms or pests. 

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
Welcome overseas workers, not their hitchhiking mates
8 March 2018
As the kiwifruit industry gears up for harvest, and the corresponding annual influx of overseas workers, it’s time to consider the risk to the biosecurity of our industry presented by overseas...
Welcome overseas workers, not their hitchhiking mates
8 March 2018

As the kiwifruit industry gears up for harvest, and the corresponding annual influx of overseas workers, it’s time to consider the risk to the biosecurity of our industry presented by overseas workers – or more accurately, their clothing, footwear and tools.

There are many biosecurity threats present in other growing regions around the world that are not here in New Zealand, and which could have a devastating impact on our industry. There have been several reports of fruit flies and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) incursions close to home in Australia, stink bugs continue to wreak havoc across Europe and the USA, and the soil-borne Brazilian Wilt has caused up to 50% vine loss on Brazilian kiwifruit orchards over recent years.

·         Make overseas workers aware of the need for excellent orchard hygiene.

·         Make sure they do not bring tools used overseas onto your orchard.

·         Check their footwear was cleaned and sanitised in their home country or at the border – don’t take any chances.

It’s important that you don’t allow any imported fruit to come on to your orchard. If you see or hear of someone that has accidently bought fruit or vegetables into New Zealand make sure it is reported to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and then appropriately destroyed by being bagged and put in the rubbish, not composted.

Keep an eye out for any unusual symptoms on your vines. If you observe any sudden vine wilt - for reasons other than the persistent heat recently - contact us immediately. We have great links to MPI and can quickly distinguish the unusual from the ordinary. We are always keen to hear from anyone who may have concerns.

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
Report confirms devastating impact of BMSB on horticulture
8 March 2018
A new economic report says if the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) established in New Zealand it would dramatically impact New Zealand’s gross domestic product (GDP) as well as export revenues...
Report confirms devastating impact of BMSB on horticulture
8 March 2018

A new economic report says if the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) established in New Zealand it would dramatically impact New Zealand’s gross domestic product (GDP) as well as export revenues from horticulture.

Prepared by the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research (NZIER), 
Quantifying the economic impacts of a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug incursion in New Zealand, shows GDP falling between $1.8 billion and $3.6 billion by 2038, and horticulture export value falling between $2 billion and $4.2 billion by 2038.

Super pests like the BMSB present a significant threat to the New Zealand kiwifruit industry and are considered one of our greatest risks. For our industry alone, the establishment of such a pest could result in production impacts in the order of hundreds of millions of dollars.

The report was commissioned by the Samurai Wasp Steering Group and funded by Horticulture New Zealand alongside KVH and several other horticultural industry groups. The steering group is looking at introduction of a biocontrol, the Samurai Wasp, to combat BMSB if it establishes in New Zealand. Read more about this work on the KVH website.

Read the media release about the report and its key findings here.

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
Stink bugs in Georgia
8 March 2018
They say a picture can paint a thousand words. Photos and videos just in from Georgia show the impact the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) has had on crops in the European country over recent years...
Stink bugs in Georgia
8 March 2018

They say a picture can paint a thousand words. Photos and videos just in from Georgia show the impact the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) has had on crops in the European country over recent years and reminds us why we absolutely must keep it out of New Zealand.

BMSB was first found in Georgia in 2015 and pest populations have built extremely quickly resulting in agricultural damage within just a few years. As an example of the damage it can do to one product alone, it destroyed much of the hazelnut harvest last year resulting in damages of NZD$84 million.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is aware of the situation with BMSB in Georgia and are managing pathways appropriately.

View the photos and videos here.

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
No longer a rural-urban biosecurity divide
8 March 2018
KVH was pleased to see that a new survey has found Kiwis – both rural and urban – hold similar and positive views on biosecurity, with most people agreeing that unwanted pests and...
No longer a rural-urban biosecurity divide
8 March 2018

KVH was pleased to see that a new survey has found Kiwis – both rural and urban – hold similar and positive views on biosecurity, with most people agreeing that unwanted pests and diseases are a threat.

The New Zealanders’ views of the primary sector survey, released by the Minister for Biosecurity last week, measures change against a 2008 benchmark survey and sought participants views on key issues facing the primary sector including biosecurity, animal welfare, and climate change.

Just over 1,200 people and nine focus groups contributed to the survey which can be read in full here.

When it comes to biosecurity, the findings were:

       Most respondents were concerned about the threat of pests and diseases to New Zealand.

       Almost all (87%) urban and (88%) rural respondents agreed that, ‘Pests and diseases are a threat to New Zealand’.

       Both urban and rural respondents also placed a high level of responsibility on all parts of society for helping to protect New Zealand from the entry or spread of pests and diseases.

       There was strong support in focus groups for taking measures to control pests and diseases.

       Participants suggested talking more about biosecurity in schools and making the issue more real for people by focusing on the impacts an incursion would have on local businesses, families and jobs. These are two things KVH is also concentrating on with initiatives like Biosecurity Week in Tauranga and this summer’s Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) awareness campaign, and the new House of Science classroom biosecurity kits.

 

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
Biosecurity in the classroom
8 March 2018
An exciting new biosecurity education kit is ready for its test-drive in local classrooms this month. Officially launched by the House of Science last week, the kit is a biosecurity focussed...
Biosecurity in the classroom
8 March 2018

An exciting new biosecurity education kit is ready for its test-drive in local classrooms this month.

Officially launched by the House of Science last week, the kit is a biosecurity focussed classroom pack for school children in years 1 to 8. It is designed to engage students in hands-on science activities in the classroom and includes biosecurity activities such as bug identification, insect trapping, surveillance and border inspection.

The activities come together in a challenging board game in which players work as a team to manage a biosecurity system that holds up against some of the world’s nastiest invaders such as fruit flies and stink bugs.

The aim of this new classroom tool is to create an experience for kids and teachers that is engaging and memorable so that ideally, this awareness stays with them as they grow into tomorrow’s biosecurity champions.

Complementing the local Tauranga biosecurity excellence partnership, the biosecurity kit has been sponsored by KVH, the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), the Port of Tauranga and other local industries. It has been developed by Better Border Security with House of Science and is available to participating schools who book the kit for a week at a time.

Social scientists will be measuring the change in biosecurity awareness resulting from use of the kit, as well as its retention over time. 

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
The kids are doing it: six-year-old stink bug finder
8 March 2018
Following the theme of future biosecurity champions, we were thrilled to get a report from a local primary school about the discovery of a potential unwanted stink bug. Prior to leaving school, a...
The kids are doing it: six-year-old stink bug finder
8 March 2018

Following the theme of future biosecurity champions, we were thrilled to get a report from a local primary school about the discovery of a potential unwanted stink bug.

Prior to leaving school, a six-year-old student at Matahui School in Katikati found a stink bug nymph, had Mum take a photo and then proudly showed the critter off to Dad. Being the small world that it is, Dads work sometimes relates to the kiwifruit industry and he had been contacted in the past by KVH about Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) so knew to make a report when he saw something unusual.

Formal identification by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) found that the bug was a native Australian Green Shield Bug.

This is a fantastic example of the great awareness of our environment, and all the living things in it (of which biosecurity is such an important element) being built up from the ground level by teachers and principals day-to-day in, and outside of the classroom. Raising public awareness is what we are all about, and our goal is for the whole country to form a team of 4.7 million biosecurity conscious New Zealanders by 2025.

The Principal at Matahui School says the school promotes this type of learning and he will keep his young scientists out-and-about in the local environment exploring, investigating, and understanding the need to spot and report anything unusual.

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
Myrtle rust still on the move
8 March 2018
There have been many new myrtle rust finds since our last update, bringing the total number of infected properties to 331, four of which are reinfections. The latest update from the Ministry for...
Myrtle rust still on the move
8 March 2018

There have been many new myrtle rust finds since our last update, bringing the total number of infected properties to 331, four of which are reinfections.

The latest update from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) confirms 27 new sites in Auckland, Wellington, Taranaki and the Bay of Plenty – three in Bethlehem, one in Otumoetai, one in Welcome Bay, and one in Whakamarama. Also, of note:

·        surveillance continues to be undertaken in the known affected areas as well as high-risk areas in Northland, and the top of the South Island,

·        myrtle rust has been found on public conservation land for the first time, in north Taranaki,

·        and the ban on movement of myrtle plants/green waste in Taranaki has been lifted. 

Because of the persistent nature of this fungal infection, and so that they have the best chance to control it over the long-term, MPI is adjusting its approach to management of myrtle rust. Treatment of infected plants now varies from street to street and region to region. MPI is working with affected property owners individually on options around self-managing infected plants where local elimination of an infection isn’t considered possible.



Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit plants or vines, you may see it on other plants on your orchard or home garden. If you think you have found it, don’t touch it – take a photo and call MPI on 0800 80 99 66.


Be on the lookout for big yellow powdery eruptions on either or both sides of the leaf; brown/grey rust pustules (older spores) which appear on older lesions; and buckled or twisted leaves which may die off. 

Biosecurity News
8 March 2018
Latest BMSB finds
8 March 2018
There have been more than 1500 Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) found at the border since the start of the high-risk season in September. More detail can be read in the February KVH risk update,...
Latest BMSB finds
8 March 2018

There have been more than 1500 Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) found at the border since the start of the high-risk season in September.

More detail can be read in the February
KVH risk update, which includes latest data reported by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and information about activities involving KVH to make sure that everything possible is being done to manage the threat posed by this unwanted pest.

Throughout February and March there have been several media reports regarding car ships from Japan containing significant numbers of stink bugs – BMSB and Yellow Spotted Stink Bug (YSSB). KVH has been strongly promoting the need to treat vehicles offshore so we don’t have this problem.

Our best chance at keeping New Zealand free of these pests, if they get past the border, is to detect any incursions early and that’s where the public play a vital role. KVH has been busy ensuring not only growers are aware of these pests, but also those most likely to encounter them and within the last fortnight we have distributed information about stink bugs to the vehicle import industry and visited larger local importers in person to discuss what to be on the lookout for and the serious impacts on the New Zealand economy should these bugs establish here. We’ve also visited local Transitional Facilities and sent posters, magnets and fact sheets to backpackers and hostels that host international visitors/seasonal workers for the kiwifruit industry.

Fact sheets about the brown and yellow stink bugs are available on the KVH website, along with videos about the impacts they have on not just orchards but also homes and lifestyles.

The New Yorker magazine also published a great feature article this week on the impacts BMSB is having on homes in the USA. Here's a teaser:

One October night a few years back, Pam Stone was downstairs watching television with her partner, Paul Zimmerman, when it struck her that their house was unusually cold. Stone and Zimmerman live just outside Landrum, South Carolina, in an A-frame cabin; upstairs in their bedroom, French doors lead out to a raised deck. That week, autumn had finally descended on the Carolinas, killing off the mosquitoes and sending nighttime temperatures plummeting, and the previous evening the couple had opened those doors a crack to take advantage of the cool air. Now, sitting in front of the TV, Stone suddenly realized that she’d left them open and went up to close them.

Zimmerman was still downstairs when he heard her scream. He sprinted up to join her, and the two of them stood in the doorway, aghast. Their bedroom walls were crawling with insects—not dozens of them but hundreds upon hundreds. Stone knew what they were, because she’d seen a few around the house earlier that year and eventually posted a picture of one on Facebook and asked what it was. That’s a stinkbug, a chorus of people had told her—specifically, a brown marmorated stinkbug. Huh, Stone had thought at the time. Never heard of them. Now they were covering every visible surface of her bedroom.

“It was like a horror movie,” Stone recalled.

Read the full-length article ‘When Twenty-Six Thousand Stinkbugs Invade Your Home’.

The risk period for BMSB stretches out for a few weeks yet so remember to be on the lookout and report anything unusual. 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz