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Biosecurity News
5 May 2016
Invasive Alligator weed found in Opotiki orchard
5 May 2016
Alligator weed, an eradication category pest in the Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s pest management plan, has been found in an Opotiki kiwifruit orchard.   The invasive weed (pictured),...
Invasive Alligator weed found in Opotiki orchard
5 May 2016
Alligator weed, an eradication category pest in the Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s pest management plan, has been found in an Opotiki kiwifruit orchard.
 
The invasive weed (pictured), is well established in the Northland area and parts of the Waikato, but is rare or not present elsewhere.  Research in Italy claims Psa can colonise and survive on a group of weed species including alligator weed. KVH is following up on this.
 
It was detected by a vigilant AgFirst employee collecting kiwifruit samples for maturity testing.  
 
The Bay of Plenty Regional Council will manage and fund an eradication programme.
 
Growers in the Opotiki area are asked to look out for the weed, which is fast-growing and would compete with kiwifruit for nutrients in the orchard. 
 
Alligator weed is a persistent aquatic and land weed with dark-green waxy leaves in opposite pairs. Stems are hollow and often reddish in colour. White clover-like flowers, 1-2 cm in diameter, appear during summer and autumn.  
 
Although alligator weed does not produce viable seed in New Zealand it can readily spread through stem fragments attached to tractor tyres or other machinery. 
 
If you suspect alligator weed is present in your orchard, contact a biosecurity officer at your local regional council.  Opotiki growers should contact Sam Stephens, Land Management Officer—Biosecurity, phone 0800 884 880.
 
Click here for a fact sheet about alligator weed.
Protocols & Movement Controls
5 May 2016
More nursery options for sourcing certified plants
5 May 2016
The kiwifruit industry now has two new nursery options to choose from when purchasing certified plants under the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS).   Niwa Nursery, located in...
More nursery options for sourcing certified plants
5 May 2016
The kiwifruit industry now has two new nursery options to choose from when purchasing certified plants under the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS).
 
Niwa Nursery, located in Whakatane, and Nga Rakau Nursery in North West Auckland, have recently joined the KPCS and are now selling KPCS-certified plants. Nga Rakau nursery sells only the smaller ‘grow-on-line’ plants which are too small to be planted out directly and are usually purchased by other nurseries to grow on. Niwa Nursery sells field grown Bruno rootstock ready for planting.
 
By joining the KPCS, these nurseries demonstrate they are managing biosecurity risks, have been independently audited, visually inspected for target organisms and returned a non-detected result for a very comprehensive testing regime for Psa-V.
 
Eight nurseries have now joined the KPCS and are supplying certified plants and two others are in the final stages of becoming part of the Scheme. Click here for a list of nurseries and their status.
 
Please be reminded that on 1 October 2016 the KPCS will be fully implemented. This means only KPCS certified kiwifruit plants may be bought or sold after this date. However, growers will still be able to produce up to 1000 kiwifruit plants for movement between their own properties within the same Psa-V region.
 
Growers should be ordering kiwifruit plants well in advance (at least one year) to enable nurseries to anticipate demand. Click here for a grower fact sheet on the KPCS.
Biosecurity News
5 May 2016
Kiwifruit industry to sign Operational Agreement for fruit flies
5 May 2016
Next week Kiwifruit Vine Health is expected to sign the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies on behalf of New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry.   This will be the first such agreement...
Kiwifruit industry to sign Operational Agreement for fruit flies
5 May 2016
Next week Kiwifruit Vine Health is expected to sign the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies on behalf of New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry.
 
This will be the first such agreement under the Government Industry Agreements (GIA) partnership and will help to further reduce the impacts of fruit flies to our horticulture sectors.
 
KVH Chief Executive Barry O’Neil explains the benefits of the OA for fruit flies.
 
“Signing the Operational Agreement is a significant milestone that will see GIA Deed signatories working together to help reduce the impacts of fruit fly.
 
“Essentially, the OA sets out the operational requirements for readiness and response activities for the four economically significant species of fruit flies (Queensland Fruit Fly, Mediterranean Fruit Fly, Oriental Fruit Fly and Melon Fruit Fly) and cost-sharing arrangements between Government and affected industries.
 
“Under the OA, KVH and other parties will agree a work plan to improve readiness and response, including reducing costs without reducing effectiveness.
 
“Being the first agreement of its type, it will set the platform for future OAs to be developed for other pests and diseases that can harm our horticultural industries.
 
“Fruit flies are the biggest biosecurity risk to the kiwifruit industry, in terms of both production and market access impacts. We’ve learnt that working together with Government and other affected industries provides a far better outcome during readiness and response activities. Signing the OA ensures joint decision-making and clarifies roles and responsibilities so all parties benefit.”

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz