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Biosecurity News
5 April 2018
Fruit fly risk not going away
5 April 2018
The risk of one of our most unwanted pests, the fruit fly, is still top-of-mind with recent finds of flies in fruit disposed of at our airport ‘declare or dispose’ bins, and incursions...
Fruit fly risk not going away
5 April 2018

The risk of one of our most unwanted pests, the fruit fly, is still top-of-mind with recent finds of flies in fruit disposed of at our airport ‘declare or dispose’ bins, and incursions into previously pest-free areas of Australia.

Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) control, surveillance and eradication activities continue on Tasmania, including responding to another single larva find in grapefruit in a supermarket the weekend before last. Biosecurity Tasmania has more than 100 staff working alongside stakeholders and industry representatives implementing a range of actions including baiting, spraying, trapping, inspecting, monitoring and planning. 

South Australia has also been affected. They are managing an outbreak of Mediterranean Fruit Fly as well as QFF outbreaks in Adelaide, and an adult QFF found in a surveillance trap in Fremantle, Perth, sparked an eradication programme to prevent any further spread. Although no further flies have been found officials say movement restrictions will remain in place until at least 18 April.

As part of control efforts in Adelaide two million sterile fruit flies have been airdropped over parts of the city in a bid to eradicate female flies – watch the video showing them being dropped out of a plane.

In the future, it’s expected that Australia will use mass release of sterile fruit flies to help with small outbreaks.  Plant & Food Research were granted permission in mid-2015 to import sterile flies into a New Zealand containment facility to develop new attractants for female and male flies. This work is part of a collaborative approach with Australian organisations and is supported by KVH as an integral part of our readiness activities.

KVH is closely following the detections and responses in Australia to make sure we monitor any change in risk to New Zealand.

The high-risk entry period for fruit flies runs through to June. Be vigilant and keep watch. While New Zealand does have a comprehensive surveillance programme in place for fruit fly, additional vigilance from growers adds another layer of protection. Read more about how to identify fruit flies on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
5 April 2018
Support for airline food restrictions
5 April 2018
KVH is supporting Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) considerations to make changes to the amount of food air passengers can bring into New Zealand. Due to the sheer volume of food being...
Support for airline food restrictions
5 April 2018

KVH is supporting Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) considerations to make changes to the amount of food air passengers can bring into New Zealand.

Due to the sheer volume of food being carried by passengers (sometimes longer-term visitors arrive with suitcase loads), border staff are spending hours not only considering biosecurity risk items but also identifying and clearing goods that don’t pose any threat.  KVH’s view is that this is not sustainable and that a completely new approach should be looked at to better manage the risk posed by food carried by an increasing number of international passengers arriving at our airports every day. 

Options KVH supports are limiting the amount of food that passengers can arrive with (e.g. less than 1kg), or alternatively charging the passenger for the time and costs involved in clearing the food.

MPI is currently discussing the matter with airline representative groups who are keen to work together to make improvements to the current system.

KVH will keep growers updated on any developments in this area. 

Grower News
5 April 2018
Biosecurity 2025: making it happen
5 April 2018
Growers can subscribe to the Biosecurity 2025 newsletter to learn all about what’s happening to implement the national biosecurity strategy. The latest edition profiles individuals and...
Biosecurity 2025: making it happen
5 April 2018

Growers can subscribe to the Biosecurity 2025 newsletter to learn all about what’s happening to implement the national biosecurity strategy.

The latest edition profiles individuals and community groups who are making a difference through their education efforts to keep out unwanted pests and diseases and includes contributions from KVH about our work building awareness in schools.

KVH and others from the kiwifruit industry took part in the development of the Biosecurity 2025 strategy and we continue to be involved through working groups and planning teams. We encourage you to subscribe to the regular updates and share your ideas so that together – within our industry and communities – we help pull together an engaged team of 4.7 million people actively taking part in managing New Zealand’s biosecurity risk.
 

Protocols & Movement Controls
5 April 2018
North-West Auckland now a Psa Recovery region
5 April 2018
Following the identification of additional Psa positive orchards and a grower meeting to discuss regional classification, North-West Auckland has moved from a Containment region to a Recovery region...
North-West Auckland now a Psa Recovery region
5 April 2018

Following the identification of additional Psa positive orchards and a grower meeting to discuss regional classification, North-West Auckland has moved from a Containment region to a Recovery region under the National Pest Management Plan (NPMP).

The change, which came into effect from 1 April 2018, was approved by the KVH Board at their March meeting.

All New Zealand kiwifruit-growing regions are classified as Exclusion, Containment or Recovery, based on the level of Psa infection.  A Recovery region is a region already widespread with the disease.

More information on regional classifications, including maps, is available on the KVH website.
 

Biosecurity News
5 April 2018
Protecting orchards from Psa through autumn
5 April 2018
Autumn is a high-risk period for Psa as cooler, wetter weather conditions favour multiplication and spread of disease. The Psa Risk Model shows heightened Psa risk from early next week for most...
Protecting orchards from Psa through autumn
5 April 2018

Autumn is a high-risk period for Psa as cooler, wetter weather conditions favour multiplication and spread of disease.

The Psa Risk Model shows heightened Psa risk from early next week for most growing regions, with moderate risk indicated for the Waikato areas – see the Karapiro weather station image below. This change in risk is normal as night temperatures begin to drop and autumn rain fronts move across the country.



Growers should step up protection in line with these seasonal changes and individual orchard risk. Ensure young replacement plants and development blocks are protected with summer rate copper as young plants are more vulnerable to Psa infection. Also apply copper to protect strung canes brought down through autumn to ensure wounds are covered before high-risk weather occurs.  For those harvesting later in the season, applying a copper spray when weather and ground conditions allow will begin to rebuild protective cover across vines. A reminder that leaf spots can provide a source of inoculum so should be considered when making decisions on spray applications.

Immediately following harvest, growers should be getting copper spray programmes underway to help prevent Psa entering their vines through harvest wounds and leaf scars.

Incorporation of Actigard into a post-harvest programme will reduce the likelihood of disease symptoms appearing the following spring. Actigard can be tank mixed with copper and is most effective when applied to leaves that are still in good condition. Extreme care must be taken to avoid spray drift onto unharvested blocks. After spraying Actigard ensure that spray tanks, lines and nozzles are cleaned thoroughly before spraying other products on unharvested fruit.

For more information, refer to KVH's Psa Best Practice Guide and the latest Actigard technote.

Any growers concerned they may not be achieving the expected levels of Psa control from copper applications at label rates should contact KVH on 0800 665 825 or email info@kvh.org.nz.

Biosecurity News
5 April 2018
Online shopping and the growing biosecurity threat
5 April 2018
Last weekend The Sunday Star Times covered a story about the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) recently prosecuting a Christchurch botanist for illegally importing moss balls through online store...
Online shopping and the growing biosecurity threat
5 April 2018

Last weekend The Sunday Star Times covered a story about the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) recently prosecuting a Christchurch botanist for illegally importing moss balls through online store AliExpress – the same website that has been known to offer kiwifruit seed for sale.

KVH is fully supportive of the action taken by MPI, not only because there could have been serious biosecurity impacts resulting from the illegal import, but also because it demonstrates that the system is working and online sites like this one are being scanned by officials.

An article in the last KVH Bulletin noted our concern around seeds being bought online for import into New Zealand because of the risk of introducing a plant disease, and mentioned that MPI enforcement staff are fully aware of this particular site. Read more about the strict rules in place for kiwifruit seed imports on the KVH website.
 

Protocols & Movement Controls
5 April 2018
Reminder to order nursery plants in advance
5 April 2018
When we visit nurseries as part of the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS), we’re reminded of how important it is to nurseries that growers order their plants well in...
Reminder to order nursery plants in advance
5 April 2018

When we visit nurseries as part of the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS), we’re reminded of how important it is to nurseries that growers order their plants well in advance.

Without a reliable estimate on anticipated demand for the next season, nurseries take a conservative approach to avoid getting left with unsold stock. Growers should order plants as far in advance as possible – preferably a year – to avoid any shortage in supply.

Additionally, growers must only purchase plants that are KVH certified. KVH movement controls must be observed. A list of nurseries and their KPCS status is available on the KVH website.

When it comes to ‘Grow for own use’ a reminder that growers may produce their own plants for use on the same property. There are no restrictions on these plants.

Growers may also produce up to 1,000 plants a year for movement between their own properties within the same KVH kiwifruit growing region. These plants do not need to meet the requirements of the KPCS but any plants being moved between properties must meet some risk management requirements. Growers in this case must complete and submit to KVH a KVH Psa-V Risk Management Plan - Growing Rootstock for your own use.

Please contact KVH on 0800 665 825 if you would like more information about the requirements.
 

Protocols & Movement Controls
5 April 2018
Movement of mature plants
5 April 2018
KVH is aware that some growers wish to move mature kiwifruit vines. The movement of plant material is considered a high-risk pathway for the transmission of unwanted organisms and therefore it is...
Movement of mature plants
5 April 2018

KVH is aware that some growers wish to move mature kiwifruit vines. The movement of plant material is considered a high-risk pathway for the transmission of unwanted organisms and therefore it is important that any such movements are given careful consideration and that appropriate measures are implemented to mitigate risk.

Please contact KVH well in advance if you wish to move any mature kiwifruit vines between properties. Contact must be made during the active growth period before the plants needs to move.
 

Biosecurity News
5 April 2018
Harvest hygiene guides available online
5 April 2018
As we head into harvest season, a reminder that KVH has biosecurity pocket guides available which have been translated into several languages to promote harvest hygiene messages. English | Maori...
Harvest hygiene guides available online
5 April 2018

As we head into harvest season, a reminder that KVH has biosecurity pocket guides available which have been translated into several languages to promote harvest hygiene messages.

English | Maori | Hindi | Nepalese | Punjabi | Samoan | Spanish | Thai | Simplified Chinese | Tongan

These tools are quick, step-by-step visual reference guides for use by all growers, on-orchard harvest workers, auditors, transporters, postharvest and harvest contractors.

Harvest season presents a high-risk period for spreading Psa or other biosecurity risks between blocks, orchards and regions because of the numbers of vehicles, machinery and people movements involved. Everyone in contact with orchards at this time of the year must be fully aware of best practice orchard hygiene. Read the KVH top tips for harvest hygiene for more information. 

Biosecurity News
5 April 2018
Have your say: draft Import Health Standard for importing Actinidia plants
5 April 2018
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is inviting comment on the proposed Import Health Standard for Actinidia plants for planting. The Standard sets out the proposed import requirements for...
Have your say: draft Import Health Standard for importing Actinidia plants
5 April 2018

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is inviting comment on the proposed Import Health Standard for Actinidia plants for planting.

The Standard sets out the proposed import requirements for Actinidia nursery stock, specifically for plants in vitro (tissue culture), imported into New Zealand for further propagation. This pathway has not been active since 2013 because of the Psa incursion.

Growers are invited to make comment on the proposed standard, which is available on the MPI website. Please email your feedback on the consultation document by 5pm Friday 4 May 2018 – information about how to do this by email or post is available on the website.

KVH recognises the importation of new kiwifruit material is an important component in maintaining the competitive advantage of our industry, however the risk of introducing new biosecurity threats must be carefully managed. Tissue culture is regarded as the most promising process for producing clean material and provides the opportunity for verification measures to be included in the production process to ensure risks are managed to an acceptable level. The consultation package includes information about the risk organisms that could potentially be transmitted on this pathway, and the proposed measures to mitigate this risk.

We will be making a submission on behalf of the industry and as part of that we’re engaging with experts in the science community in New Zealand and internationally to ensure we have specific technical advice available on the risks of what is being proposed.

We encourage growers to also make submissions – we’ll keep you fully informed before any decisions are made on the outcome of this pathway.

If you have any questions about the formal consultation process or KVH’s submission, please contact us on 0800 665 825 or email info@kvh.org.nz.
 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz