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Biosecurity News
26 January 2017
Preparing for fruit fly
26 January 2017
KVH and the other signatories who signed the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies, last year agreed on the approach to readiness and response activities. While getting to this point was a...
Preparing for fruit fly
26 January 2017


KVH and the other signatories who signed the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies, last year agreed on the approach to readiness and response activities. While getting to this point was a significant achievement in itself, it has also led to a review of areas that can be improved.

A technical working group has been established to progress the readiness and response technical improvements that have been agreed, of which the priorities are;
  • Optimising the current surveillance programme for early detection. New Zealand maintains a world class surveillance grid for fruit fly that involves over 7500 traps, which has successfully resulted in early detection of fruit fly on nine occasions enabling eradication.  But are there opportunities for further improvement, including locations, period, and lures that are used in the traps?
  • Pre-agreeing the major risks in a response and identifying opportunities to reduce cost associated with low risk activities.  Examples during the Grey Lynn response include managing risk associated with major sporting events and supermarkets located within the controlled area.  Understanding true risk associated with these activities will enable us to manage the risks appropriately.
  • Reviewing the current Fruit Fly Response Standard. Are there opportunities to enhance this standard using new technology or best practice developed internationally, or our own learnings from recent responses?  Are there any activities that are not required which could result in a future eradication being undertaken successfully, without having to spend $1.5 million responding to the detection of a single fruit fly?
KVH is well represented in this process, with Barry O’Neil serving as chairman of the Fruit Fly Council which oversees the Operational Agreement, and Matt Dyck as an observer on the Technical Working Group tasked with delivering projects to improve our readiness and response capability.
 
Company Notices
26 January 2017
KVH board farewells Lorry Leydon
26 January 2017
  The KVH board would like to acknowledge the work of Lorry Leydon, who has been an associate board director for the past two years. Lorry’s reflections from his time on the board are...
KVH board farewells Lorry Leydon
26 January 2017
 
The KVH board would like to acknowledge the work of Lorry Leydon, who has been an associate board director for the past two years. Lorry’s reflections from his time on the board are below:
 
“It seems a long time ago when I walked in to my first board meeting at KVH. It was an exciting opportunity for me, and I was looking forward to observing how the cogs turned in the inner sanctum of the boardroom. My experience from that very first day was of an extremely cohesive board, committed to the New Zealand kiwifruit industry.
 
My two years on the board has overseen a transition period for KVH, where the primary focus has gradually shifted from Psa-V to the wider realm of biosecurity. As we move out of the shadow of Psa, it is important to remember the lessons we have learned, and ensure that we remain vigilant to all possible threats. It is essential that growers don’t become complacent, and that KVH is supported in their role to protect New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry from biosecurity threats.
 
I would like to thank KVH for the initiative in developing an associate director role – this is a rare opportunity which has given me a great experience in governance and leadership. I would also like to thank my fellow directors for their guidance and tutelage over the last few years. Lastly, I would like to thank the whole team at KVH, and acknowledge their hard work and dedication on behalf of the kiwifruit industry.”
 

 

Biosecurity News
26 January 2017
Stopping BMSB
26 January 2017
KVH has been working with industry groups and MPI to develop an Operational Agreement for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug under the GIA partnership. Industry groups met yesterday to consider the...
Stopping BMSB
26 January 2017


KVH has been working with industry groups and MPI to develop an Operational Agreement for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug under the GIA partnership.

Industry groups met yesterday to consider the possible approach to cost sharing between MPI and industry, along with how we can agree to the industry split of the costs involved.  Our objective is to have an OA in place by mid-2017, which will ensure we are doing everything we can to stop BMSB establishing in NZ.

KVH is also a core member of a steering group preparing an application to be able to release an effective parasitoid wasp of BMSB (The Asian wasp Trissolcus japonicus), should BMSB arrive in NZ.  The wasp parasitises the eggs of BMSB and when established destroys up to 75% of the eggs.  The objective is to have the application for release ready to present to the Environmental Protection Agency in September 2017.
 
Biosecurity News
26 January 2017
Kiwifruit sector Operational Agreement
26 January 2017
KVH and MPI are finalising a kiwifruit sector operational agreement under the GIA partnership for pests and pathogens that are specific to the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors, and are working to have...
Kiwifruit sector Operational Agreement
26 January 2017

KVH and MPI are finalising a kiwifruit sector operational agreement under the GIA partnership for pests and pathogens that are specific to the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors, and are working to have the agreement in place in March 2017.  

The agreement will initially focus on the major threats to our industry, including Ceratocystis fimbriata, Verticillium wilt, non-NZ strains of Psa, and invasive Phytophthora’s.  It will include readiness and response plans for the major sector risks that will enable us to be able to find and respond immediately to eradicate if these are found in NZ.  It also confirms cost sharing between MPI and KVH on a 50/50 basis for the costs involved.

Biosecurity News
26 January 2017
Super biosecurity puppies
26 January 2017
The Ministry for Primary Industries has a new litter of a super breed of biosecurity detector puppies. Born on 24 November from a beagle and a harrier hound it is the first time MPI had crossed these...
Super biosecurity puppies
26 January 2017

The Ministry for Primary Industries has a new litter of a super breed of biosecurity detector puppies. Born on 24 November from a beagle and a harrier hound it is the first time MPI had crossed these breeds for detection work.

MPI Detection Technology Manager Brett Hickman says MPI has high hopes for the puppies, which will grow to about the size of a labrador. "We normally use beagles as biosecurity dogs. The beagle-harrier crosses will be taller than beagles, making it easier for them to sniff backpacks and airport luggage stacked on trolleys."
 
If the new puppies pass their training, they will start work in 2018 detecting food and other items that pose biosecurity risk to New Zealand.
 
Mr Hickman says MPI has 60 biosecurity detector dog teams operating at New Zealand airports and ports. “They are an essential part of New Zealand’s biosecurity defences, particularly when it comes to locating seeds and other smaller risk items that can be hard to detect by baggage x-ray screening.”
 
Photo credit: David White/FairfaxNZ
 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz