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Biosecurity News
19 October 2017
Working with Maori to manage kiwifruit risks
19 October 2017
KVH Chairman Adrian Gault and Peter Mourits attended the Te Whanau a Apanui Growers meeting at Te Kaha last Thursday. KVH appreciated the opportunity to meet with the Maori Growers Forum and Adrian...
Working with Maori to manage kiwifruit risks
19 October 2017

KVH Chairman Adrian Gault and Peter Mourits attended the Te Whanau a Apanui Growers meeting at Te Kaha last Thursday.

KVH appreciated the opportunity to meet with the Maori Growers Forum and Adrian took the chance to provide an update on KVH’s mission and strategy, and talked about how KVH is working to prepare the industry for the next biosecurity incursion.

Peter presented an overview of major biosecurity threats, with a focus on fruit flies and the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). He outlined the impacts that the BMSB is having on kiwifruit production in Italy and the potential threat of this bug to over 300 plant species here in New Zealand. He reminded growers that not only is BMSB a risk to horticulture, but to local community gardens too.

The potential role of the Samurai Wasp as a biocontrol agent for the BMSB was discussed, along with research that has been undertaken over the last two years by Dr John Charles where he has been studying any potential impact from the wasp on New Zealand native species (if it were to be introduced). It was pleasing to report the wasp is very host specific and will not impact other species.

KVH acknowledged the support of the Maori Grower Forum and thanked them for their submission on the Samurai Wasp to the Steering Group who are preparing an application for consideration by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the introduction of the wasp in the event a BMSB population is found in New Zealand.

KVH looks forward to continuing dialogue with this forum and working collaboratively to protect Maori interests from biosecurity threats to the kiwifruit industry.

Biosecurity News
19 October 2017
Spring weather Psa protection
19 October 2017
Wet spring conditions are ideal for Psa build up and infection of young tender growth. Over the last week and a half KVH has been at orchards and Zespri OPC spring field days seeing and recording...
Spring weather Psa protection
19 October 2017

Wet spring conditions are ideal for Psa build up and infection of young tender growth. Over the last week and a half KVH has been at orchards and Zespri OPC spring field days seeing and recording symptoms – view a Psa photo gallery on the KVH website.  

With the KVH Risk Model showing days of wet weather, this is a timely reminder that growers must maintain full spray cover over the season, particularly prior to, or directly after high-risk weather, on all varieties. Those with young plants and grafts (which are particularly vulnerable) need to take care that they are getting strong protection on, and have good coverage.

The online KVH Psa Risk Model can help with this and should be used to plan spray timings. The model is a weather-based tool that uses actual weather station data and weather forecast information to provide customised access to weather and disease interpretations.

There are several spray product options available. Be sure to meet all user guide requirements. If applying bactericides ensure there are no flowers present in the sward or on vines. KVH has produced a fact sheet covering spray products - including copper, bactericides (Kasumin), Actigard and CPPU for green varieties - and recommended timings for each. CPPU products may only be applied to Green varieties and may not be painted directly onto vines as this practice is not approved by ACVM.

Key points on the use of preflower girdles are also included in the fact sheet, including:

  • For green varieties (Hayward and Gold14) in high Psa risk areas apply a full trunk girdle 30 days before the first female flower opens. This will reduce sepal staining and Psa budrot, therefore improving fruit-set.
  • Only girdle in fine weather, check girdle depth, and sanitise tools between every vine.
  • Girdle older trunks rather than young scions.
  • Avoid girdling stressed vines.

Copies of the factsheet are available on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
19 October 2017
Field days highlight biosecurity
19 October 2017
KVH has been at the recent Zespri OPC spring field days talking to growers about on-orchard biosecurity and Psa management, particularly over the current high-risk spring and summer...
Field days highlight biosecurity
19 October 2017

KVH has been at the recent Zespri OPC spring field days talking to growers about on-orchard biosecurity and Psa management, particularly over the current high-risk spring and summer season.

Attendance at field day events has been strong, with many growers sharing their thoughts and learnings with peers in small group get togethers, which have worked well.

KVH has enjoyed detailed discussions with growers about biosecurity risks and the range of resources available on the KVH website including fact sheets and videos that demonstrate the impacts of unwanted pests. We were pleased to hear that many growers have already watched our Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) videos and are prompting others to do the same. The importance of immediately reporting unusual symptoms was also highlighted – the sooner we are alerted, the more we can do to help. Early detection is key to eradication.

Timely discussions were also had about Psa. We know from our talks with growers that the weather has been difficult and we expect to see more symptoms over the coming weeks. The key points from the field days are:

·         A few sites are reporting more incidence of Psa in blocks, particularly younger blocks and those on more difficult sites. Growers are being proactive in getting on sprays when possible.

·         Field days have highlighted the rapid development of canopy through the spring period, emphasising the need to continue with protective sprays to ensure new leaf area is protected.

·         For some Gold3 sites M91 males are showing Psa signs and infection is being cut out. Hayward sites historically hit with Psa are also reporting some infection in males, particularly if less tolerant varieties like Matua are still in the canopy.

·         The recommendation is to cut and remove infected material from the canopy to avoid wet and windy periods spreading inoculum through the canopy.

·         Some early Te Puke Hayward sites are reporting leaf spotting and flowerbud infection as vines come under load. The caution here is for growers to monitor to understand what is happening and get protection on as weather allows. Psa sprays should be in place prior to high-risk weather.

·         Some orchards have been identified with Psa this week for the first time – see the latest statistics on the KVH website. 

Read more about the importance of spring weather Psa protection.

Biosecurity News
19 October 2017
Bug spotting at Disneyland
19 October 2017
They say Disneyland is home to all creatures great and small and late last week we had a report of a sighting of something quite a bit smaller than the usual. While on the monorail at the...
Bug spotting at Disneyland
19 October 2017

They say Disneyland is home to all creatures great and small and late last week we had a report of a sighting of something quite a bit smaller than the usual.

While on the monorail at the famous park, a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) was seen and photographed by a vigilant New Zealand kiwifruit grower who snapped a photo of it and then, needless to say, double checked all the family belongings and bags before returning home.

This level of vigilance (especially while on holiday) is great to see - KVH congratulates the grower for being so aware of what the BMSB looks like, and for knowing what to do to ensure it didn’t travel back to New Zealand with him. This is an example of how easily one of these bugs could make its way here and what a difference each of one of us can make just by being aware, and taking a few simple steps.

Everyone in the kiwifruit industry has a responsibility to manage biosecurity risks when travelling. To assist, KVH has developed best practice for kiwifruit growers to help reduce biosecurity risk after being overseas (especially if also visiting an orchard or farm); and to explain what growers can expect at border control when arriving back in New Zealand.

Biosecurity News
19 October 2017
Ensuring a pest-free port this cruise season
19 October 2017
The summer cruise season is starting at the Port of Tauranga and KVH is speaking with tour drivers about the important role they have in ensuring unwanted pests don’t reach the local community...
Ensuring a pest-free port this cruise season
19 October 2017

The summer cruise season is starting at the Port of Tauranga and KVH is speaking with tour drivers about the important role they have in ensuring unwanted pests don’t reach the local community and kiwifruit orchards.

As part of upcoming Biosecurity Week 2017 activities, KVH will be meeting and speaking to all drivers at the Port when the next cruise ship is in, reminding them of what they can do to keep unwanted pests out – namely, making sure all visitors follow good biosecurity hygiene practices, knowing what pests to look out for, and reporting anything unusual that is found by passengers in their hand luggage and belongings while travelling on tour buses.

The key message is that pests from offshore, like the Queensland Fruit Fly and other fruit flies, can cause serious harm to local primary industries and New Zealand’s unique environment; and through the Port of Tauranga is one of the many ways in which they can enter.

All drivers and tour operators are provided with biosecurity and kiwifruit orchard hygiene requirement messages that can be used in onboard addresses. These reiterate any food or plant items that shouldn’t be inadvertently taken off the ship and need to be placed in local amnesty bins at the port or reported to Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) staff present on the day.

Importantly, specific messages about the damage a biosecurity incursion could do to the kiwifruit industry are also provided. Buses travelling to kiwifruit orchards instruct passengers that when they step off the bus on arrival they walk over a footwear sanitisation pad. Biosecurity messages are further reinforced during on-orchard talks.

The start of cruise season coincides with Biosecurity Week 2017, which starts Monday October 30 and involves KVH, MPI and the Port of Tauranga working together to increase awareness of biosecurity with those who work on and around the port. The award-winning initiative is in its third year and has the goal of ‘no biosecurity incursions coming through the port’. We’ll have more information about Biosecurity Week in the next Bulletin.

 

Grower News
19 October 2017
Your favourites in one place
19 October 2017
There’s an area of the website for growers that makes it easier and quicker to find useful information. Under the ‘Growers’ tab there is a section called ‘Grower...
Your favourites in one place
19 October 2017

There’s an area of the website for growers that makes it easier and quicker to find useful information.

Under the ‘Growers’ tab there is a section called ‘Grower resources’ where we list quick links to the most viewed and topical documents, videos and news items on the KVH site. Growers can go to this resource page instead of having to search across different website pages and sections to find items of interest.

The page is regularly updated to provide growers with current information.

Biosecurity News
19 October 2017
Reminder to be on the lookout for myrtle rust
19 October 2017
Symptoms of myrtle rust are likely to be a lot more prevalent with warmer temperatures and summer looming. If you see it on plants on your orchard, property, or garden, don’t touch it. Take...
Reminder to be on the lookout for myrtle rust
19 October 2017

Symptoms of myrtle rust are likely to be a lot more prevalent with warmer temperatures and summer looming. If you see it on plants on your orchard, property, or garden, don’t touch it. Take a photo and call the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on 0800 80 99 66.

Be on the lookout for brig yellow powdery eruptions on either or both sides of the leaf; brown/grey rust pustules (older spores) which appear on older lesions; and buckled or twisted leaves which may die off.

Good hygiene practices should always be followed to help manage biosecurity threats, particularly the KVH hygiene recommendations. The key point is that plant material, vehicles, people and equipment can carry pests and diseases. Restrict access to orchards and ensure visitors, harvest staff, and contractors know and follow your hygiene requirements.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz