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Biosecurity News
17 May 2018
Biocontrol defence against BMSB: last chance to have your say
17 May 2018
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one of the biggest biosecurity threats we face and it could cause hundreds of millions of dollars of losses. If an incursion is found here the consequences...
Biocontrol defence against BMSB: last chance to have your say
17 May 2018

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one of the biggest biosecurity threats we face and it could cause hundreds of millions of dollars of losses. If an incursion is found here the consequences would be disastrous for New Zealand’s horticultural industries.

The Samurai Wasp (which is the size of a pinhead and doesn’t sting humans or animals) provides an opportunity to be proactive in our approach and gives us another tool we can use to control BMSB.

Image to the right of a male Samurai Wasp (scale 0.5mm), courtesy of Jo Poulton, Plant and Food Research.

KVH, other horticultural groups and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), have made an application to the Enviornmental Protection Authority (EPA) seeking approval to release the wasp as a biocontrol agent against BMSB, but only if an incursion is found in New Zealand.

The EPA is currently seeking public opinion on the application and you have until 5pm Thursday 31 May 2018 to make a submission.

KVH is making a submission on behalf of the kiwifruit industry and your views count too. We encourage growers to have a say and we can make available to you a copy of the KVH submission that you may wish to reference content from when making your own submission to the EPA (or use the template we've created to help with this).

If you have any questions you can email us at info@kvh.org.nz or phone us on 0800 665 825.

Biosecurity News
17 May 2018
Monitor and remove Psa to protect next crop
17 May 2018
Autumn is here and new active cankers with exudate have been found on orchards in several regions over recent weeks.  For growers who have completed harvest, now is a good time to complete a...
Monitor and remove Psa to protect next crop
17 May 2018

Autumn is here and new active cankers with exudate have been found on orchards in several regions over recent weeks. 

For growers who have completed harvest, now is a good time to complete a round of Psa monitoring to identify areas where you may need to modify your pruning strategy to ensure as much Psa as possible is removed from the canopy.  Look for cane and leader dieback and fresh exudate. Any large active cankers are likely to worsen before spring, so consider removing these before you send the pruners in.

Autumn spray programmes should include regular copper application at full winter rates and if possible at least one Actigard where leaf is fully functioning.  Actigard can be tank mixed with copper and is most effective when applied to leaves that are still in good condition. Extreme care must be taken to avoid spray drift onto unharvested blocks. After spraying Actigard ensure that spray tanks, lines and nozzles are cleaned thoroughly before spraying other products on unharvested fruit.

For more information, refer to KVH's Psa Best Practice Guide and the latest Actigard technote.

To maintain a high level of on-orchard hygiene, growers should continue to monitor pruning staff and ensure tool hygiene at all times. Restrict access to unnecessary vehicles. Best practice guides are available on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
17 May 2018
Remove unpicked kiwifruit from vines
17 May 2018
Growers are reminded that unpicked kiwifruit must be removed from vines by 1 July. Unpicked fruit can increase the amount of wild kiwifruit plants establishing in nearby areas of native bush or...
Remove unpicked kiwifruit from vines
17 May 2018

Growers are reminded that unpicked kiwifruit must be removed from vines by 1 July.

Unpicked fruit can increase the amount of wild kiwifruit plants establishing in nearby areas of native bush or exotic forestry as fruit ripening over the winter months provides a food source for birds.

Birds spread seed through their droppings, together with a small fertiliser package. A proportion of this seed can readily germinate.

Unmanaged kiwifruit vines, including those with unpicked fruit, may also be a potential host for plant disease organisms.

Unpicked fruit needs to be dropped to the ground and mulched. This prevents mass-feeding by birds over an extended period.

Under the National Psa Pest Management Plan (NPMP) it is a requirement to remove all unpicked fruit from vines by 1 July each year.  After this date KVH will follow-up reports of unpicked fruit with orchard owners and post-harvest companies.

Biosecurity News
17 May 2018
Summer summary: everyone on the lookout for BMSB
17 May 2018
Every New Zealander has a role to play in managing the risk of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). KVH co-funded a nationwide summer BMSB education campaign with the Ministry for Primary Industries...
Summer summary: everyone on the lookout for BMSB
17 May 2018

Every New Zealander has a role to play in managing the risk of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

KVH co-funded a nationwide summer BMSB education campaign with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and other horticultural sectors to lift public awareness around the damaging impacts of the pest and increase the likelihood of early detection through surveillance.



The results of the summer campaign are in:

•    There were 931 calls to the MPI biosecurity hotline (more than double last year).
•    Website ads generated the most calls to the hotline.
•    There were over 6.5 million views of our online ads.
•    The Metservice weather app ad was by far the most viewed of all our ads.
•    Just over 30,500 visitors to the BMSB page on the MPI website (12500 more than last year).
•    Ruud ‘the Bug Man’ Kleinpaste posts and videos were the most effective social media tools.
•    There was a lot of news media interest in BMSB, especially around the turned away ships in Auckland and the Samurai Wasp as a biocontrol. The morning after a KVH story about BMSB aired on the One News 6pm show in late August, MPI received 15 calls about suspect bugs from people who had seen the clip.

Partnerships were also a big focus of the campaign. KVH worked across the kiwifruit industry to talk about BMSB and distribute information. Some initiatives were:

•    New posters, fliers and stickers distributed to packhouses, transitional facilities, and vehicle importers.
•    Information sent to all members of NZ Plant Producers Inc, including nurseries and Mitre 10 stores.
•    Posters and leaflets distributed through PGG Wrightson and Fruitfed suppliers.
•    Hospitality NZ helped communicate the BMSB threat through their newsletters and social media.
•    Allied Pickfords transport put messages on trucks and in warehouses/depots.
•    The Port of Tauranga Biosecurity Excellence partnership focussed on BMSB during the local biosecurity week with staff who work on and around the port.

Biosecurity News
17 May 2018
Conference raises Xylella awareness
17 May 2018
Last week KVH attended the Better Border Biosecurity (B3) conference in Wellington.  B3 is a joint venture for plant biosecurity science in New Zealand integrating expertise and investment from...
Conference raises Xylella awareness
17 May 2018

Last week KVH attended the Better Border Biosecurity (B3) conference in Wellington.  B3 is a joint venture for plant biosecurity science in New Zealand integrating expertise and investment from several Crown Research Institutes, and end users such as the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and industry.

In addition to profiling research into new, smarter biosecurity tools such as remote sensors and advanced diagnostics, the conference had an underlying theme of building collaboration to achieve better biosecurity. This includes working alongside Australia more, as they are our closest parallel in the biosecurity sense being an isolated South Pacific nation with similar challenges and pressures, but also present our greatest risk given how near and connected our countries are.

At a more local level, collaboration includes building biosecurity excellence in local communities and the conference featured a presentation by John Kean on the science that is being developed to support regional initiatives for biosecurity excellence in port communities.

A presentation that caught everyone’s attention was the keynote talk from Professor Alexander Purcell (Berkeley College, USA) on the biosecurity threat of Xylella fastidiosa to New Zealand.

Photo credit: Antonio Sorrentino/LUZ/eyevine

X. fastidiosa is a bacterium that has caused severe impacts to the Californian wine industry and is currently decimating the Italian olive industry, killing over a million olive trees. Kiwifruit is not a known host however Dr Purcell provided an insight into the complexities associated with this pathogen and discussed the wide range of strains affecting different plants. Although the true host range of all strains is currently impossible to predict or test, MPI and industry groups for other horticultural products that are known hosts to this pathogen have had it on their radar for many years, as have Australia.

The presentation and workshop following the conference provided an opportunity to advance preparedness for X. fastidiosa and identify where to focus our efforts. For example, it’s spread through Europe has highlighted the importance of biosecurity controls on plant material movements before pathogens are detected.

X. fastidiosa took some time to diagnose, and continues to be debated, as it spreads through Europe. It has now been detected in France and Spain, which produces half of the world’s olive oil.

Dr Purcell suggests that the number of different strains present in these European regions could mean Xylella has been introduced on more than one occasion. Biosecurity practices and traceability reduce the likelihood of spreading such pathogens and provide a far better chance of containment or eradication should they arrive here at all.

Biosecurity News
17 May 2018
BMSB expertise from Chile
17 May 2018
Last Thursday KVH and New Zealand Avocado hosted a discussion about Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) with Ilania Astorga from Servicio Agricola y Ganadero, the Chilean equivalent of our Ministry for...
BMSB expertise from Chile
17 May 2018

Last Thursday KVH and New Zealand Avocado hosted a discussion about Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) with Ilania Astorga from Servicio Agricola y Ganadero, the Chilean equivalent of our Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).

Iliania was invited to New Zealand by the BMSB Council (a partnership between horticultural industry groups and MPI) and also presented at the two-day Better Border Biosecurity conference earlier in the week.

Attended by biosecurity experts, industry representatives and scientists from across the region, the discussion focused on where and when BMSB has been found since the bug was first detected in urban Santiago (the Chilean reponse is still confined to an urban environment). Initiatives currently underway to manage it, including survellaince and trapping activities were also discussed.

There was also a Q&A session during the presentation to learn more about the opportunities and challenges faced by the Chileans and how these can help shape New Zealands response plans. 

For example, BMSB is capable of flying up to 100k a day but the Chilean experience is that the bugs don’t move much, or very far in distance, which may be due to the large number of preferred host trees in the city and the fact that bugs don’t need to travel far to get the food and nutrients needed.



This discussion with Ilania built on the learnings of an ‘NZ Inc’ group - including KVH - that visited Chile late last year to assist in the response. Read more about that trip
here. This relationshop provides an excellent opportunity for New Zealand to learn from Chile’s experience and assist to mitigate the risk of entry to New Zealand, and refine our own response tools and strategies.

Biosecurity News
17 May 2018
Managing risk from importing plants could stop the next incursion
17 May 2018
KVH has made a submission on behalf of the kiwifruit industry to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on the proposed Import Health Standard (IHS) for Actinidia plants for planting. The IHS...
Managing risk from importing plants could stop the next incursion
17 May 2018

KVH has made a submission on behalf of the kiwifruit industry to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on the proposed Import Health Standard (IHS) for Actinidia plants for planting.

The IHS sets out the proposed import requirements for Actinidia nursery stock, specifically for plants in vitro (tissue culture), imported into New Zealand for further propagation. This pathway has not been active since 2013 because of the Psa incursion.

KVH recognises importing new kiwifruit material is an important part of maintaining the competitive advantage of our industry, however our submission focuses on the level of uncertainty around potential risk of introducing new biosecurity threats and how this risk must be carefully managed so that if the pathway is enacted, it is robust and reduces risk to the kiwifruit industry. We have also included specific technical advice we commissioned from experts in the science community in New Zealand and overseas.

All submissions are now being considered by MPI. There will then be a 10 day period where all submitters have the opportunity to examine any changes to the IHS which have resulted from the consultation.

We will keep growers informed before any decisions are made on the outcome of this pathway.

If you have any questions about the KVH submission, please contact us at info@kvh.org.nz or phone us on 0800 665 825.

Biosecurity News
17 May 2018
Fine for failing to declare risky plants
17 May 2018
An air traveller who deliberately failed to declare plant materials to quarantine officers has been fined $3,300 by the Manukau District Court. Arriving at Auckland Airport from China in April, the...
Fine for failing to declare risky plants
17 May 2018

An air traveller who deliberately failed to declare plant materials to quarantine officers has been fined $3,300 by the Manukau District Court.

Arriving at Auckland Airport from China in April, the traveler ticked the "no" box next to the question on her declaration card asking whether she was bringing plants into New Zealand. A baggage search revealed seeds concealed in three bags of food and in a hand towel. Two plant cuttings were also found in her baggage, and another in her jacket pocket.

Plant cuttings are a serious biosecurity risk for the kiwifruit industry (and others) and KVH fully supports the courts and Ministry for Primary Industries taking strong action where people deliberately flout the rules and attempt to bring risk items into the country that could be carrying pests or diseases.

Read more about the fine and other recent biosecurity convictions here.

Biosecurity News
17 May 2018
Unwanted!
17 May 2018
Each month we profile one of the 12 most unwanted pests featured on our ‘Port of Tauranga – committed to biosecurity excellence’ calendar. Any of these pests could potentially enter...
Unwanted!
17 May 2018

Each month we profile one of the 12 most unwanted pests featured on our ‘Port of Tauranga – committed to biosecurity excellence’ calendar. Any of these pests could potentially enter our borders and have a major impact on local community and businesses, the kiwifruit industry or other local growers. Profiling these pests and raising public awareness increases the chances of early detection, should an incursion occur.

This month the focus is a significant threat to the avocado industry, the Shot Hole Borer. These are small beetles that are a destructive pest of forest trees and attack fruit, shade and ornamental trees.


Originating in Southeast Asia, this invasive beetle is now causing significant impacts throughout California’s avocado industry where adult females tunnel into trees to lay eggs and grow fungus, which spreads and attacks tree tissue. Initial infection is followed by wilting of branches and discolouration of leaves, and then the collapse of heavy branches.

The pest is particularly attracted to injured or stressed trees - look out for any damage caused by wood-boring beetles, especially entry/exit holes surrounded by wet discoloration or white exudate. The beetle’s holes penetrate 1-4cm into the wood.

Shot Hole Borer beetles fly from tree to tree, but can cover considerable distances. Spread is through plant, equipment, and wood movements.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz