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Biosecurity News
16 April 2015
Researching new tools for the battle against BMSB
16 April 2015
One of the challenges with BMSB is the lack of effective tools available to detect and control this organism. In comparison the tools available for fruit fly are far more advanced as research has...
Researching new tools for the battle against BMSB
16 April 2015

One of the challenges with BMSB is the lack of effective tools available to detect and control this organism. In comparison the tools available for fruit fly are far more advanced as research has been ongoing for a much longer period of time.

Last year in response to the emerging threat of BMSB, MPI and other GIA signatories developed a research plan to provide more tools in the battle against BMSB. The three themes where the research is directed are:

  1. prevent its entry;
  2. detect it early; and
  3. eradicate it if feasible and minimise the damage if the pest establishes.

Many of the research projects have been granted urgent priority status and link in to existing projects in the USA to deliver results as quickly as possible. Some projects have delivered results already. However, for others results will still be years away given the nature of the work.

In addition to this wider coordinated research approach, the kiwifruit industry is also undertaking research specific to our industry.

The impacts of BMSB on kiwifruit are unknown as there are few instances where invading BMSB populations overlap with kiwifruit production areas.
KVH has initiated discussions with Californian researchers to establish trials that will determine the impacts of BMSB on kiwifruit in both the laboratory and outdoor planted areas.

Matt Dyck, KVH Biosecurity

Biosecurity News
16 April 2015
Stink bug campaign raises public awareness
16 April 2015
A joint campaign between KVH, MPI and PipFruit NZ to raise public awareness of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) has resulted in several people contacting KVH with suspected sightings....
Stink bug campaign raises public awareness
16 April 2015

A joint campaign between KVH, MPI and PipFruit NZ to raise public awareness of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) has resulted in several people contacting KVH with suspected sightings. Thankfully, none of these have been confirmed as the BMSB. However, its encouraging people are proactively keeping an eye out for them.

Bay of Plenty media have also picked up on the campaign and run a story to help raise local awareness – click here.

The BMSB is very similar to stink bugs already common in New Zealand. A good resource comparing the BMSB with other common stink bugs can be found on the BMSB page on the MPI website here.

Keeping BMSB out of NZ remains a real challenge and success depends on our ability to detect it as early as possible.

Know what BMSB looks like and educate your friends and family. The key distinguishing features of the BMSB are:

  • Its size (14–17mm)
  • white banding on the antennae
  • alternate black and white markings on the abdomen.

If you think you have seen BMSB, catch it and call the MPI pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66.

Matt Dyck, KVH Biosecurity
 

Biosecurity News
16 April 2015
QFF - Australian home gardeners experience
16 April 2015
Its well-known the Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) is a significant threat to New Zealand’s horticultural industry. However, it would also be a huge problem for home and hobby gardeners who enjoy...
QFF - Australian home gardeners experience
16 April 2015

Its well-known the Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) is a significant threat to New Zealand’s horticultural industry. However, it would also be a huge problem for home and hobby gardeners who enjoy growing fruit for their own use.

Female QFFs lay eggs under the skin of ripening fruit. These eggs hatch into white maggots that live and feed in the fruit for 7-12 days causing the fruit to rot from the inside.

Home gardeners in Australia have been living with the fruit fly for many years. In most Australian states and territories, fruit fly control is now the responsibility of every backyard gardener. These ongoing controls can include sanitisation, spraying, baiting, trapping and covering plants and are costly in terms of time, money and effort.

The number of websites and Youtube clips dedicated to teaching backyard growers’ about best-practice management and controlling fruit fly is indicative of the problem it has become in Australia.

  • Click here to watch a short Youtube clip by a gardener showing a QFF laying eggs into a cucumber and the resulting damage to fruit.
  • Click here to see images of QFF affected fruit.

The QFF is described as the bane of Australian gardeners’ and growers’ lives and it’s in everyone’s best interest to keep it out of New Zealand.

Also see: www.preventfruitfly.com.au which is sponsored by the National Fruit Fly Strategy.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications

Biosecurity News
16 April 2015
Queensland fruit fly response - residents in for the long haul
16 April 2015
MPI confirmed last week the residents in the Grey Lynn controlled area are in for the long haul as the QFF response is likely to continue until at least November. To date, 14 adult flies have been...
Queensland fruit fly response - residents in for the long haul
16 April 2015

MPI confirmed last week the residents in the Grey Lynn controlled area are in for the long haul as the QFF response is likely to continue until at least November.

To date, 14 adult flies have been located and the last find was over a month ago on 6 March. The last detection of larvae in fruit collected from the affected area was on 13 March. While this is good news, it is still too early to confirm the flies are gone for good.

Response activities over winter
MPI expects to stop the baiting treatments in the Controlled Area sometime around early June, as fruit flies ‘hibernate’ during winter, and resume in the springtime to ensure all flies are eradicated. The surveillance traps will remain in place during winter, but will be checked less frequently.

During this time the controls on the movement of fruit and vegetables outside of the Controlled Area will continue to ensure any surviving flies are not spread from the area. MPI recently made it easier to comply with the rules by allowing customers to purchase fruit and vegetables at certain MPI-approved retailers within the Controlled Area that can be taken outside of the Controlled Area.

To keep up to date with information on the MPI website click here.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz