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Company Notices
13 July 2017
AGM reminder
13 July 2017
KVH’s Annual General Meeting (AGM) will commence at 9am on Thursday August 24, 2017, at the ASB Arena in Mount Maunganui. This is a public meeting and anyone who is interested is most welcome...
AGM reminder
13 July 2017

KVH’s Annual General Meeting (AGM) will commence at 9am on Thursday August 24, 2017, at the ASB Arena in Mount Maunganui.

This is a public meeting and anyone who is interested is most welcome to attend.

Growers will receive their AGM packs in the mail during the first week of August. These will include the Chairman’s Report, 2016 KVH audited financial statements and proposed budget for the 2018/2019 financial year. Also included will be a recommendation of the rate of the NPMP and Biosecurity Levy for the 2018 year, proposed rule changes, Explanation of Resolutions and your voting paper.

The NZKGI and Zespri AGMs will follow immediately afterwards.

Company Notices
13 July 2017
Meet the team - introducing Karyn Lowry
13 July 2017
Karyn Lowry joined the KVH team in January 2011 to assist with supervising sampling and monitoring teams in Te Puke during the initial Psa response. Karyn is now the longest serving member of...
Meet the team - introducing Karyn Lowry
13 July 2017

Karyn Lowry joined the KVH team in January 2011 to assist with supervising sampling and monitoring teams in Te Puke during the initial Psa response.

Karyn is now the longest serving member of the team, working in the areas of surveillance and compliance. Her role has included organising various monitoring programmes associated with Psa, developing and maintaining KVH protocols and ensuring post-harvest compliance standards are met. This includes an audit function across pack houses, kiwifruit processors, budwood suppliers and pollen mills.

Since the inception of the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) in 2014 she has been involved in assisting nurseries wanting to join the scheme in producing their manuals, and organising associated sampling, testing and external auditing.

After attending Waikato University and qualifying with a B.Ed. Karyn worked as a primary school teacher until her first child was born. She and her husband developed and managed a 20-hectare family property with sheep, beef cattle, avocados, tamarillos and 7 ca hectare of Hayward kiwifruit from 1977 until the property sold in 2005.

She worked for Zespri for 10 years firstly as a Quality Assessor then as Quality Assurance Manager running the audit team and maintaining Zespri’s quality system accreditation with what was then the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry.

Karyn was also involved with Board of Trustees when they were first implemented in schools in 1989 and spent nine years at Pyes Pa School with four as Chairperson, and then another six years on the Tauranga Girls’ College Board with four of those as Chairperson.

Now that her children have grown up Karyn enjoys spending time with her three grandsons and getting away as often as possible with her husband in their caravan.

Grower News
13 July 2017
Growers encouraged to attend science update meeting
13 July 2017
When: Friday 28 July. Join us at 9.45am for coffee, the meeting will run from 10.00am to midday. Where: The Orchard, 20 Macloughlin Drive, Te Puke. Zespri and KVH are hosting a practical science...
Growers encouraged to attend science update meeting
13 July 2017

When: Friday 28 July. Join us at 9.45am for coffee, the meeting will run from 10.00am to midday.
Where: The Orchard, 20 Macloughlin Drive, Te Puke.


Zespri and KVH are hosting a practical science update meeting for growers to share some of the results from recent research and discuss how this may be used to improve on orchard Psa management.

The meeting will include information about the latest situation on Psa in China and Europe, an update from Dr Joel Vanneste on copper resistance to Psa, Dr Greg Clark covering spring girdling for Psa control, Dr Phil Elmer on progress with a new product for Psa control, Dr Stephen Hoyte on progress with the Gold3 comparative orchard trial, and Dr David Manktelow on how to improve spray coverage for better results.

We look forward to seeing growers there.

 
Grower News
13 July 2017
Latest nurseries to join KPCS
13 July 2017
KVH is pleased to announce that two nurseries have joined the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) within the last fortnight. Keepa Road nursery in Whakatane has met the requirements to...
Latest nurseries to join KPCS
13 July 2017

KVH is pleased to announce that two nurseries have joined the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) within the last fortnight.

Keepa Road nursery in Whakatane has met the requirements to sell KPCS “within region” certified field grown plants to Whakatane growers.

Fernbrook Farm nursery has also met the requirements to sell KPCS “within region” certified field grown Bruno rootstock to Tauranga growers.

Growers are reminded that KVH movement controls must be observed when ordering kiwifruit plants from nurseries and only KPCS certified plants should be obtained. For a list of nurseries and their KPCS status, and to find out more about requirements of the KPCS, click here.

Grower News
13 July 2017
Heading overseas? Advice for returning growers
13 July 2017
Everyone in the kiwifruit industry has a responsibility to manage biosecurity risks when travelling. To assist, KVH has developed best practice for kiwifruit growers to help reduce biosecurity...
Heading overseas? Advice for returning growers
13 July 2017

Everyone in the kiwifruit industry has a responsibility to manage biosecurity risks when travelling.

To assist, KVH has developed best practice for kiwifruit growers to help reduce biosecurity risk after visiting an offshore orchard or farm; and to let you know what you can expect through border control when arriving back in New Zealand.

The handy one-page advice sheet is available on the KVH website, summarising the practical things growers should do (and be aware of) before and during travel back across the New Zealand border.

Grower News
13 July 2017
Drop and mulch unpicked fruit
13 July 2017
Under the National Psa-V Pest Management Plan (NPMP), it is a requirement to remove all unpicked fruit from vines by 1 July yearly.  Any unpicked kiwifruit is now softening and if left on...
Drop and mulch unpicked fruit
13 July 2017

Under the National Psa-V Pest Management Plan (NPMP), it is a requirement to remove all unpicked fruit from vines by 1 July yearly. 

Any unpicked kiwifruit is now softening and if left on vines will be a food source for birds such as white-eyes, blackbirds or sparrows.  For the kiwifruit industry, unpicked fruit is not a good thing as birds deposit kiwifruit seed via their droppings into nearby bush or forestry blocks, resulting in further wild kiwifruit infestations.  A few fruit missed by pickers is enough to perpetuate a wild kiwifruit problem.    

Contractors work throughout the year to control wild kiwifruit in the Bay of Plenty.  The cost of this work is more than $200,000 yearly – growers are funding most of this control work through KVH. Over time this cost could reduce through better management of unpicked fruit which is the seed-source for wild vines. KVH is working with other regional councils to detect and destroy any wild kiwifruit plants before they establish or spread. 

Unpicked fruit and unmanaged kiwifruit vines may also be a potential host for plant disease organisms.

Unpicked fruit needs to be dropped to the ground and mulched - the fruit will quickly compost.  KVH is following up on a small number of reports of unpicked fruit. If growers are aware of unpicked orchards or parts of orchards, please contact John Mather at KVH.

Grower News
13 July 2017
Manage cut out trunks within the orchard
13 July 2017
Growers are reminded to manage any cut out vine material, including any sawn-off trunks or leaders, within the orchard.  Do not dump cut out vines into any adjacent gully, forest or...
Manage cut out trunks within the orchard
13 July 2017

Growers are reminded to manage any cut out vine material, including any sawn-off trunks or leaders, within the orchard.  Do not dump cut out vines into any adjacent gully, forest or bush.  If wild kiwifruit establishes from dumped vines the orchard owner will have to fund the total cost of wild vine control and remove the trunks. 

Disposal pits need to be properly constructed, like in the image to the right.  Old vine trunks and leaders may be burnt or buried within the pit.  Follow the guidelines within the KVH Protocol - Disposal Options.  A heavy-duty mulcher is an excellent disposal option.  Remember to remove all plant material from the machine and wash and sanitise before leaving the orchard.

If burning, ensure the material is dry and follow all regional council Air Plan requirements.  Ensure that any smoke is not a hazard for nearby roads or a nuisance to neighbours.  Also remember that it is prohibited to burn treated timber.

Biosecurity News
13 July 2017
Stink bug agreement signed
13 July 2017
An agreement which focuses on avoiding the damaging aspects of a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) incursion was signed this afternoon by KVH with other horticultural groups and the Ministry for...
Stink bug agreement signed
13 July 2017

An agreement which focuses on avoiding the damaging aspects of a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) incursion was signed this afternoon by KVH with other horticultural groups and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), at the Horticulture Conference.

The agreement, under the Government Industry Agreement for Biosecurity readiness and response (GIA) sets out the operational requirements for readiness and response activities and cost-sharing arrangements between Government and affected industries in the management of the BMSB threat. It enables joint decision-making between the parties and sees them all working together to reduce the impacts of BMSB to affected industries.

A summary of the agreement is available on the KVH website.

BMSB is number two on our Kiwifruit’s Most Unwanted list, and it’s a serious pest to horticulture as well as the public. In the USA, the ever-expanding BMSB population is considered a nuisance pest, infesting homes and taking over lifestyles.




In addition to the agreement signed today, a KVH work programme is well underway with Zespri so the kiwifruit industry will be as fully prepared as possible in the event of an incursion. This includes looking at how decisions will be made around operational/field activities, how information will be shared with growers, and how we can ensure other industries are kept informed of our activities.

The next high-risk season for BMSB is only weeks away. Visit the BMSB page of the KVH website for more information, video, and fact sheets about this unwanted pest.

Biosecurity News
13 July 2017
Support for biosecurity prosecution
13 July 2017
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) announced late last week the conviction of a Christchurch firm for submitting a false declaration that could have created a serious biosecurity...
Support for biosecurity prosecution
13 July 2017

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) announced late last week the conviction of a Christchurch firm for submitting a false declaration that could have created a serious biosecurity breach.

The customs broking firm prosecuted by MPI falsely declared that the header unit of an imported combine harvester was new when it was in fact used. When inspected by officials and effectively cleaned, the waste from the header filled three 240-litre containers.

KVH is supportive of the action taken by MPI, not only because there could have been serious biosecurity impacts resulting from the contamination (potentially impacting any primary or horticultural sector industry), but also because it demonstrates that the system is working and does pick up on inconsistencies like incorrect paperwork.

We also support even stronger action being taken by MPI in situations where rules are disregarded, including rejecting the importation of uncleaned machinery altogether.

There are strict rules in place for importing vehicles and equipment to ensure they are free from harmful pests and diseases. KVH and other industry groups have been reiteraring this with importers of machinery and machinery parts, particularly in light of the threat of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), and most recently at Fieldays.

Media Releases
13 July 2017
Stink bug agreement signed
13 July 2017
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one of the biggest threats facing New Zealand’s horticultural sector. It threatens the livelihoods of primary sector producers, and would impact on the...
Stink bug agreement signed
13 July 2017

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one of the biggest threats facing New Zealand’s horticultural sector. It threatens the livelihoods of primary sector producers, and would impact on the quality of life of all New Zealanders if ever able to establish here.

An agreement to reduce the damaging impact of BMSB incursion was signed today by a number of horticultural sector groups and Government at the Horticulture NZ Conference in Tauranga.

BMSB Council Chairperson, Alan Pollard, says this means primary industry organisations and the Ministry for Primary Industries can work together to prepare for and reduce the impacts of the pest.

“While BMSB populations have never taken hold in New Zealand, it’s a sneaky pest that spreads fast and has been caught at the border on passengers and in imported goods many times,” says Mr Pollard.

“If given the opportunity, BMSB has the potential to cause billions of damage to the New Zealand economy. They attack a wide range of New Zealand crops such as grapes, kiwifruit, apples, and stone fruit, corn and many other valuable crops” said Mr Pollard. “In addition, BMSB can ruin peoples’ gardens and when it gets cold, BMSB tends to bunch up in large numbers in dark spaces in homes and other dwellings, making it a huge public nuisance.”

The agreement, under the Government Industry Agreement for Biosecurity readiness and response (GIA) sets out operational requirements for readiness and response activities and cost-sharing arrangements between Government and affected industries in the management of the BMSB threat. It enables joint decision-making between the parties and sees them all working together to reduce the impacts of the pest to the affected industries.

 

“By working together under GIA, Government and affected industries can achieve far greater outcomes for the benefit of all New Zealanders” says Mr Pollard. “This operational agreement enables us to harness the capabilities of both Government and industry groups to fight BMSB head on. It also gives industry groups a seat at the decision-making table and ensures that an industry perspective is included when decisions are made.”

Initial signatories to the operational agreement are Pipfruit NZ, Kiwifruit Vine Health Ltd, New Zealand Avocado Growers Association, Tomatoes New Zealand, Vegetables New Zealand, NZ Winegrowers, and the Ministry for Primary Industries. It is expected that other industry groups impacted by BMSB will sign the operational agreement in the future once they have joined the GIA partnership.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz