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Biosecurity News
1 June 2017
First readiness and response plan under GIA
1 June 2017
KVH has developed a Readiness and Response Plan for Brazilian Wilt (Ceratocystis fimbriata), the first of its kind under the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for Biosecurity Readiness and...
First readiness and response plan under GIA
1 June 2017
KVH has developed a Readiness and Response Plan for Brazilian Wilt (Ceratocystis fimbriata), the first of its kind under the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for Biosecurity Readiness and Response.
 
Brazilian Wilt is one of Kiwifruit's Most Unwanted and a priority for readiness work by KVH. It’s a fungus with a wide host range and wide geographic and genetic diversity. Non-New Zealand strains (for which this plan was developed) would likely cause significant production impacts to the New Zealand kiwifruit industry.
 
The fungus is present in over 35 countries, including New Zealand, in a wide range of hosts. There is significant uncertainty about which strains present a risk to kiwifruit, where these strains are present and the possible entry pathways.
 
The disease-causing kiwifruit strain in Brazil would likely cause significant production impacts as potentially all kiwifruit cultivars are susceptible. The impact of other strains is unknown. Market access impacts are unlikely for fruit.
 
If Brazilian Wilt is confirmed in kiwifruit, actions to manage the response will follow commitments that have been entered into by KVH - on behalf of industry - and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) under GIA and as per the developed plan.
 
The plan was finalised and formally signed by KVH and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) last Tuesday.
 
Pictured above signing the Brazilian Wilt readiness and response plan are, from left, GIA Partnerships Senior Business Analyst Grant Boston, GIA Partnerships Team Manager Angela Brownie, KVH CEO Barry O’Neil and MPI’s Readiness Group Manager Melanie Russell.
Grower News
1 June 2017
KVH at Fieldays
1 June 2017
Barry and the team will be stationed in the Zespri tent at the National Fieldays at Mystery Creek, Hamilton, on Wednesday, June 14, Thursday, June 15 and Friday, June 16. Zespri will host a lunchtime...
KVH at Fieldays
1 June 2017
Barry and the team will be stationed in the Zespri tent at the National Fieldays at Mystery Creek, Hamilton, on Wednesday, June 14, Thursday, June 15 and Friday, June 16. Zespri will host a lunchtime presentation to growers from 12pm each day, where KVH and NZKGI will also speak. Please come and visit the KVH stall for a chat at any point throughout the day – we would be keen to discuss any questions, issues or suggestions you may have about biosecurity.
Grower News
1 June 2017
Hawkes Bay grower meeting
1 June 2017
All growers are urged to attend.   When:      Tuesday 6 June at 4pm Where:     Duke Hotel, 389 Gloucester Street, Taradale   KVH is reviewing the Hawkes Bay...
Hawkes Bay grower meeting
1 June 2017
All growers are urged to attend.
 
When:      Tuesday 6 June at 4pm
Where:     Duke Hotel, 389 Gloucester Street, Taradale
 
KVH is reviewing the Hawkes Bay regional classification to determine if it should change the Hawke’s Bay from a Containment to a Recovery region and is seeking input from growers in the region. Staff from KVH will be presenting at the meeting on what a change in status would mean for the region and is seeking grower feedback.
 
Please take the opportunity to attend and ensure you have an opportunity to contribute to this important discussion.
Grower News
1 June 2017
Psa risk is high
1 June 2017
Winter is here, bringing cold conditions and plenty of rain - both of which increase the risk of Psa infection and spread. This Whangarei weather station image emphasises this change, predicting...
Psa risk is high
1 June 2017
Winter is here, bringing cold conditions and plenty of rain - both of which increase the risk of Psa infection and spread. This Whangarei weather station image emphasises this change, predicting severe Psa risk for the area throughout the coming week. Heightened risk is also currently predicted for Northland, Gisborne and Hawke’s Bay.
 
All growers should ensure full winter rate coppers are applied, as soon as possible after harvest, to protect fruit stalk wounds and leaf scars through this high-risk period. Include spreaders to improve coverage of these difficult targets and, where leaf condition remains strong, application of Actigard is also recommended. A second application of Actigard can be applied to blocks which harvested early if leaf condition is still strong. Take care to avoid drift to unharvested fruit and wash out spray tanks and spray lines thoroughly to avoid the risk of contamination.
 
In frosted areas or where vines have begun to shut down, ensure further copper is applied as leaves continue to fall. Remember late season canopies are difficult targets and impossible to cover with a single spray. Change direction of sprayer travel in consecutive spray rounds to help improve coverage.
 
Pay special attention to high-risk areas of the orchard, such as those with high levels of leaf spotting through spring, or areas where you have previously cut out infection. Areas with new plantings or newly-grafted blocks also need excellent protection through this period.
Grower News
1 June 2017
Budwood movement
1 June 2017
Budwood movement will be a focus for many suppliers and growers at this time of year, particularly to those cutting over to new licences and those with new plantings.   As budwood poses the...
Budwood movement
1 June 2017
Budwood movement will be a focus for many suppliers and growers at this time of year, particularly to those cutting over to new licences and those with new plantings.
 
As budwood poses the highest risk of disease transfer, please remember:
 
  • Use the cleanest source of budwood and from your own orchard where possible.
  • Budwood suppliers must be registered with KVH and supply a copy of their Psa-V Risk Management Plan.
  • Growers must only obtain budwood from a KVH-registered supplier.
  • Budwood movement must comply with the controls outlined in KVH Protocol: Budwood.
  • Movement of Gold3 budwood also requires Zespri authorisation.
  • Budwood movement from Psa-V positive orchards is allowed in Recovery regions only. Please note, movement between Psa-V positive orchards between Recovery regions is subject to KVH authorisation and this may be withheld if alternative lower risk options are available.
  • For ‘not detected’ orchards, monitoring, sampling and testing must occur within six weeks of budwood collection.
  • Budwood collection area is to be sprayed with copper within four weeks of collection.
  • Maintain tool hygiene and sanitisation.
  • Records of budwood supplied and received must be maintained and kept with grower GAP records.
If you are unsure of the movement controls or have any queries, please contact KVH on 0800 665 825 or email info@kvh.org.nz
Biosecurity News
1 June 2017
KVH welcomes new biosecurity funding
1 June 2017
New Zealand’s biosecurity efforts received a welcome $18.4 million boost in Budget 2017. Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy said the money would help further strengthen New Zealand’s...
KVH welcomes new biosecurity funding
1 June 2017
New Zealand’s biosecurity efforts received a welcome $18.4 million boost in Budget 2017. Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy said the money would help further strengthen New Zealand’s biosecurity system and protect borders. Some of the funding would go to addressing biosecurity risk off-shore, reviewing Import Health Standards, and lifting public awareness of biosecurity responsibilities.
 
KVH applauds this commitment to biosecurity and looks forward to working with MPI to ensure the kiwifruit industry does its part to the biosecurity efforts in New Zealand.
Biosecurity News
1 June 2017
Border Clearance overview
1 June 2017
MPI’s annual summer Border Clearance Services report has been released and it shows a 41 percent increase in infringements issued at the border. There were 1.9 million passenger arrivals...
Border Clearance overview
1 June 2017
MPI’s annual summer Border Clearance Services report has been released and it shows a 41 percent increase in infringements issued at the border. There were 1.9 million passenger arrivals between December 2016 and February 2017 (up 9 percent on the previous summer) and 4737 undeclared seizures (up 12 percent). A total of 3538 infringements were issued.
 
Of particular interest to those in horticulture were the 2963 undeclared fresh produce seizures (consistent with 2015-2016 summer) and the 2091 undeclared mail seizures, which MPI attributed to an increase in seizures of seed and grain.
 
For further information, see the MPI infographic Border Clearance Services Summer Report here.
Company Notices
1 June 2017
Meet the team - introducing Matt Dyck
1 June 2017
Before Matt joined KVH as a Biosecurity Analyst in 2013, he was working in the jungles of Northern Malaysia as an Environmental Manager for the country’s largest finfish aquaculture operation....
Meet the team - introducing Matt Dyck
1 June 2017
Before Matt joined KVH as a Biosecurity Analyst in 2013, he was working in the jungles of Northern Malaysia as an Environmental Manager for the country’s largest finfish aquaculture operation. A marine scientist by study, he now finds himself helping the kiwifruit industry prepare for the next big biosecurity threat, a transition that he says has been relatively smooth.
 
“My role is largely about working with experts to understand the risk organisms place to our industry, our current state of preparedness and gaps we need to address through research and development. It’s great that kiwifruit growers recognise the importance of biosecurity and have a dedicated organisation like KVH to look after their interests”.
 
Matt has recently completed the Readiness Plan for Brazilian Wilt (Ceratocystis fimbriata), a task completed in partnership with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to confirm a mutually agreed approach, peer-reviewed by a panel of experts. Brazilian Wilt is a fungal pathogen that is causing significant impacts to the kiwifruit industry in Brazil and Matt adds that while the readiness plan itself might not make for the most exciting reading, it sits amongst his most notable achievements while at KVH.
 
“When KVH and Zespri staff first heard of Brazilian Wilt, it was just a few unsubstantiated claims that something was happening in another country without any details of the cause or potential controls. To get from that point of a limited understanding, to where we are now with a detailed plan summarising what we know, knowledge gaps that will be filled through research, and an agreed plan to how we will respond to incursions with MPI, is a real achievement and a testament to the industry for investing in being fully prepared for these threats”. 
 
“Even though we still have a lot to progress, we have an agreed plan with MPI to how we will increase our knowledge, and how we will respond, which will allow us to get straight into action for growers should an incursion occur”.
 
Matt is already beginning to work on the next Readiness Plan which he aims to complete before the end of the year and is continually working with Zespri, MPI and the science community to learn about new offshore risks.
 
“Planning at an industry level can only take us so far - it is also important that every grower manages biosecurity risk at their orchard boundary level, as this is the most effective way to reduce the impact of threats that may already be in New Zealand, undetected”. He refers to work completed as part of his Kellogg Rural Leadership project last year titled Avoiding complacency in kiwifruit biosecurity. KVH is working to build on the recommendations of this report to ensure that the industry learns from the Psa experience and implements the required practices to reduce the impact of our next big incursion.
 
NEWSFLASH: Warm congratulations to Matt and his wife Donna who welcomed twins Georgia and Zara to their family on Monday, May 29. The team at KVH can’t wait to meet the new arrivals!
Grower News
1 June 2017
Remove all unpicked fruit from vines and help protect our industry
1 June 2017
Growers are reminded of the importance of removing unpicked kiwifruit, including any arguta variety, from vines following harvest.  Fruit left on vines ripens and softens over winter months,...
Remove all unpicked fruit from vines and help protect our industry
1 June 2017

Growers are reminded of the importance of removing unpicked kiwifruit, including any arguta variety, from vines following harvest.  Fruit left on vines ripens and softens over winter months, allowing birds such as white-eyes or sparrows to feed on the fruit and spread the vine’s seeds through their droppings. This exacerbates the establishment of wild vines, especially where orchards are adjacent to native bush, scrub or forestry blocks.

More than $300,000 is invested in wild kiwifruit control annually and we still do not have control over the problem. Contractors in the Bay of Plenty control an average of 11,000 wild vines yearly.  There are increasing reports of wild kiwifruit recorded in the Gisborne and Nelson-Tasman regions, but wild vines can establish wherever kiwifruit is grown.

Rules in the National Psa-V Pest Management Plan include the requirement that fruit is removed from vines by 1 July each year. If fruit remains unpicked, it should be dropped to the ground as soon as possible and mulched so that the fruit pulp composts. This avoids any situation of fruit remaining on vines and accessible to birds, resulting in more wild vines.

KVH will be following up on any reports of unpicked orchards, or areas within orchards.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz