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Biosecurity News
15 June 2017
Dutch kiwifruit grower reaches out for Psa assistance
15 June 2017
The Netherlands’ first kiwifruit grower has reached out to the New Zealand industry for advice in dealing with possible Psa symptoms. Multi award-winning Dutch businesswoman and...
Dutch kiwifruit grower reaches out for Psa assistance
15 June 2017

The Netherlands’ first kiwifruit grower has reached out to the New Zealand industry for advice in dealing with possible Psa symptoms.

Multi award-winning Dutch businesswoman and horticulturalist Djûke van der Maat grows half a hectare of northern Italian variety Greenlight and Tomori male at her family’s 28-hectare diversified farm in Bunnik, The Netherlands.

Djûke is a participant in this year’s Rabobank Global Farmer Master Class programme alongside grower Trish Jones. When Djûke discovered red exudate and shoot and cane wilt, she contacted Trish and her husband Paul for advice. They provided support and approached KVH and respected growers for additional information and insight.

The affected vines were immediately removed. KVH provided information on copper products and best practice. As the orchard was close to flowering, a low rate copper spray was advised. However implementation of the suggested products is difficult, because of availability and application regulations.

Test results are due back from a laboratory next week. Three weeks prior to discovery of the symptoms, the area had been hit by a severe frost. Temperatures on the site dropped to -7 degrees Celsius. Djûke uses frost pots but it is likely there was a degree of frost damage and some of those New Zealand growers who have been talking to Djuke thought there was a chance the frost could be to blame for the symptoms. Djûke is still hopeful that frost may turn out to be the cause. 

Biosecurity News
15 June 2017
KVH presents to Maori Kiwifruit Grower Forum
15 June 2017
Yesterday the Maori Kiwifruit Grower Forum was officially launched to advocate on behalf of these growers and ensure they are well informed of key issues. Biosecurity is one such issue and KVH...
KVH presents to Maori Kiwifruit Grower Forum
15 June 2017

Yesterday the Maori Kiwifruit Grower Forum was officially launched to advocate on behalf of these growers and ensure they are well informed of key issues.

Biosecurity is one such issue and KVH presented to the group to seek their support in our bid for Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval to release a biocontrol agent, should one day the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) establish in New Zealand.

BMSB is a significant threat to kiwifruit and horticultural industries given that it is highly likely to enter our borders and establish here, causes significant impacts to horticultural industries and also to the public by infesting their homes, and is extremely difficult to control requiring frequent applications of toxic insecticides.

However, in countries where BMSB is native, a biocontrol exists that keeps BMSB populations in check by parasitising their eggs. This is the Samurai midge (Trissolcus japonicus) which has been the subject of intense research and host testing in both New Zealand and the USA to determine its suitability as a biocontrol agent. This process is nearly complete and we hope to have an EPA decision by September of this year. 

Biosecurity News
15 June 2017
BMSB readiness update
15 June 2017
While a biocontrol agent is considered the most effective control tool against Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), KVH is also working closely with Zespri to ensure that we are doing everything we can...
BMSB readiness update
15 June 2017

While a biocontrol agent is considered the most effective control tool against Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), KVH is also working closely with Zespri to ensure that we are doing everything we can across the supply chain to reduce the impact of this pest.

KVH and Zespri have established a working group to progress a Kiwifruit BMSB Readiness Plan. This plan identifies activities to mitigate impacts of BMSB across the supply chain and has an associated workplan to ensure these activities become viable in the near future.

The workplan has been given a high priority in both organisations and the readiness plan is expected to be largely complete with only long-term research and development outstanding, by September this year.

A simulation will be held before the next high-risk period, to test the practicalities of this plan with KiwiNet, our industry biosecurity champions. 

Biosecurity News
15 June 2017
Myrtle rust in Te Puke
15 June 2017
KVH is helping mobilise support for experts determining the extent of the myrtle rust incursion in Te Puke. A Te Puke woman contacted the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to report myrtle...
Myrtle rust in Te Puke
15 June 2017

KVH is helping mobilise support for experts determining the extent of the myrtle rust incursion in Te Puke.

A Te Puke woman contacted the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to report myrtle rust-like symptoms on a ramarama tree on her property.

KiwiNet received a request from AsureQuality and MPI to provide resources to assist with the response in the Te Puke area. We were happy to oblige, had a good response from our networks and were pleased to have been able to provide the resources required.

Myrtle rust is a fungal infection that can travel long distances in the wind and attacks plants of the Myrtaceae family. It doesn’t affect kiwifruit but could affect iconic New Zealand plants like pōhutukawa, kānuka, mānuka and rātā, as well as commercially-grown species such as eucalyptus, guava and feijoa.

Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit vines, growers will want to check any Myrtaceae plants on their property.

Look for:
• bright yellow powdery eruptions appearing on the underside of the leaf (young infection)
• bright yellow powdery eruptions on both sides of the leaf (mature infection)
• brown/grey rust pustules (older spores) which can appear on older lesions
• buckled or twisted leaves which may die off.

If you see any of these symptoms, call MPI immediately on 0800 80 99 66. Take a photo but don’t touch or take samples as this might increase spread of the disease.

This discovery should not impact movement of kiwifruit plants from nurseries unless they are growing or selling myrtle rust host material (Myrtaceae species).  Those nurseries need to follow the myrtle rust protocols for nurseries on the New Zealand Plant Producers Inc (NZPPI) website.

Biosecurity News
14 June 2017
Myrtle rust found in Te Puke
14 June 2017
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has confirmed the presence of the myrtle rust plant disease at a residential property in Te Puke.  A link to MPI’s media release is available...
Myrtle rust found in Te Puke
14 June 2017

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has confirmed the presence of the myrtle rust plant disease at a residential property in Te Puke. 

A link to MPI’s media release is available here.

The property location is not being released publicly, but KVH understands it is close to kiwifruit orchards. In this area, harvest is likely to be complete.
 
Myrtle rust is a fungal infection that can travel long distances in the wind and attacks plants of the Myrtaceae family. 
 
It doesn’t affect kiwifruit but could affect iconic New Zealand plants like pōhutukawa, kānuka, mānuka and rātā, as well as commercially-grown species such as eucalyptus, guava and feijoa.
 
Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit vines this is an important and timely reminder for all growers to look out for symptoms on Myrtaceae trees and shrubs around your orchard and in gardens. 
 
Look for:
  • bright yellow powdery eruptions appearing on the underside of the leaf (young infection)
  • bright yellow powdery eruptions on both sides of the leaf (mature infection)
  • brown/grey rust pustules (older spores) which can appear on older lesions
  • buckled or twisted leaves which may die off
 
If you see any of these symptoms call MPI immediately on 0800 80 99 66. Take a photo but don’t touch or take samples as this might increase spread of the disease.
 
Biosecurity News
1 June 2017
First readiness and response plan under GIA
1 June 2017
KVH has developed a Readiness and Response Plan for Brazilian Wilt (Ceratocystis fimbriata), the first of its kind under the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for Biosecurity Readiness and...
First readiness and response plan under GIA
1 June 2017
KVH has developed a Readiness and Response Plan for Brazilian Wilt (Ceratocystis fimbriata), the first of its kind under the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for Biosecurity Readiness and Response.
 
Brazilian Wilt is one of Kiwifruit's Most Unwanted and a priority for readiness work by KVH. It’s a fungus with a wide host range and wide geographic and genetic diversity. Non-New Zealand strains (for which this plan was developed) would likely cause significant production impacts to the New Zealand kiwifruit industry.
 
The fungus is present in over 35 countries, including New Zealand, in a wide range of hosts. There is significant uncertainty about which strains present a risk to kiwifruit, where these strains are present and the possible entry pathways.
 
The disease-causing kiwifruit strain in Brazil would likely cause significant production impacts as potentially all kiwifruit cultivars are susceptible. The impact of other strains is unknown. Market access impacts are unlikely for fruit.
 
If Brazilian Wilt is confirmed in kiwifruit, actions to manage the response will follow commitments that have been entered into by KVH - on behalf of industry - and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) under GIA and as per the developed plan.
 
The plan was finalised and formally signed by KVH and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) last Tuesday.
 
Pictured above signing the Brazilian Wilt readiness and response plan are, from left, GIA Partnerships Senior Business Analyst Grant Boston, GIA Partnerships Team Manager Angela Brownie, KVH CEO Barry O’Neil and MPI’s Readiness Group Manager Melanie Russell.
Biosecurity News
1 June 2017
KVH welcomes new biosecurity funding
1 June 2017
New Zealand’s biosecurity efforts received a welcome $18.4 million boost in Budget 2017. Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy said the money would help further strengthen New Zealand’s...
KVH welcomes new biosecurity funding
1 June 2017
New Zealand’s biosecurity efforts received a welcome $18.4 million boost in Budget 2017. Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy said the money would help further strengthen New Zealand’s biosecurity system and protect borders. Some of the funding would go to addressing biosecurity risk off-shore, reviewing Import Health Standards, and lifting public awareness of biosecurity responsibilities.
 
KVH applauds this commitment to biosecurity and looks forward to working with MPI to ensure the kiwifruit industry does its part to the biosecurity efforts in New Zealand.
Biosecurity News
1 June 2017
Border Clearance overview
1 June 2017
MPI’s annual summer Border Clearance Services report has been released and it shows a 41 percent increase in infringements issued at the border. There were 1.9 million passenger arrivals...
Border Clearance overview
1 June 2017
MPI’s annual summer Border Clearance Services report has been released and it shows a 41 percent increase in infringements issued at the border. There were 1.9 million passenger arrivals between December 2016 and February 2017 (up 9 percent on the previous summer) and 4737 undeclared seizures (up 12 percent). A total of 3538 infringements were issued.
 
Of particular interest to those in horticulture were the 2963 undeclared fresh produce seizures (consistent with 2015-2016 summer) and the 2091 undeclared mail seizures, which MPI attributed to an increase in seizures of seed and grain.
 
For further information, see the MPI infographic Border Clearance Services Summer Report here.
Biosecurity News
18 May 2017
Quick-view: biosecurity risk at a glance
18 May 2017
We’ve added a new resource to our website that gives you a quick overview of biosecurity risk and the work KVH is doing to manage risk to the kiwifruit industry. The KVH Dashboard is...
Quick-view: biosecurity risk at a glance
18 May 2017

We’ve added a new resource to our website that gives you a quick overview of biosecurity risk and the work KVH is doing to manage risk to the kiwifruit industry.

The KVH Dashboard is produced every three months to provide the industry with a view of the current biosecurity threat levels and our ability to respond and manage these threats should they arrive.

The single page view Dashboard includes links to more detail available online and summarises risk information relevant to the kiwifruit industry from latest reports by the Ministry for Primary Industries.

Biosecurity News
18 May 2017
Packhouses raising the biosecurity bar
18 May 2017
KVH is currently completing annual packhouse site audits to confirm biosecurity measures are in place as per Packhouse Psa-V/Biosecurity Risk Management Plans. We have been impressed by the level...
Packhouses raising the biosecurity bar
18 May 2017

KVH is currently completing annual packhouse site audits to confirm biosecurity measures are in place as per Packhouse Psa-V/Biosecurity Risk Management Plans.

We have been impressed by the level of compliance and the commitment to biosecurity shown by staff at packing facilities.

Systems originally introduced for Psa will stand the industry in good stead should a new biosecurity incursion occur – e.g. bin sanitisation systems, management of reject fruit, and loadout procedures such as pre-loading inspections of sea containers for target organisms.

Yard staff are managing differing regional requirements for identification and segregation of bins, and those post-harvest facilities involved in harvest activities are maintaining high levels of on-orchard hygiene.

Overall, the audits are reflecting what KVH is pleased to see as a positive move towards biosecurity risk management measures becoming increasingly considered ‘business as usual’ by sites, and an integral part of running successful operations.

Biosecurity News
18 May 2017
Kiwifruit production damaged by frosts in Italy
18 May 2017
Severe frosts that hit much of Europe in late April are estimated to have damaged up to 70% of kiwifruit production in a major Italian growing area. Low temperatures from 20-22 April appear to...
Kiwifruit production damaged by frosts in Italy
18 May 2017

Severe frosts that hit much of Europe in late April are estimated to have damaged up to 70% of kiwifruit production in a major Italian growing area.

Low temperatures from 20-22 April appear to have severely affected growers in the Lazio region, where around 30% of national production is based. The key points from the research are:

• There are about 6,000 hectares of kiwifruit (both yellow and green) between Latino and Rome, and the damage is between 60-70%
• Some orchards have 100% damage, some have none - especially in the higher areas
• Male plants were generally less affected than the smaller female plants
• Anti-hail nets provided some degree of protection, depending on location
• Yellow kiwifruit varieties had just started the flowering period when the frosts hit, while the green cultivars were a few days away from flowering
• There has also been damage in Piedmont (the country’s second most productive region) with damage estimates ranging from 10-30%.

We talked about the need to increase Psa protective sprays in line with seasonal weather changes in an April edition of the Bulletin after we had news out of northern Italy that following extensive wet and harsh weather, Psa symptoms indicate infection this spring is higher than previous years.

Following on from our own wet, windy weather we could see the same symptoms here in New Zealand next spring if the right action isn’t taken to protect orchards post-harvest.

Detailed information and guidance for protecting and managing orchards is available in the Psa-V Best Practice Guide available on the KVH website. 

Biosecurity News
18 May 2017
Most unwanted pest data released
18 May 2017
The highest risk period for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) is coming to an end and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has released data summarising...
Most unwanted pest data released
18 May 2017

The highest risk period for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) is coming to an end and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has released data summarising interceptions and interventions for the 2016/17 period.

KVH has made both the BMSB and QFF reports available online. Making data like this available is something that we’re committed to and have been working closely with MPI on this season to ensure correct, up-to-date information is shared that helps demonstrate the work taking place at our borders that industry is playing a key role in.

Although we’re not in the high-risk period at the moment there is never zero risk – growers are reminded to be on the lookout for these serious pests year-round. As mentioned in the last Bulletin, BMSB has been found in Chile. It’s the first southern hemisphere detection and increases the risk to us here as our seasons are compatible and BMSB could arrive year-round. 

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Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz