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Biosecurity News
15 November 2018
Biosecurity Forum; celebrating success and partnering to protect
15 November 2018
KVH attended the Biosecurity New Zealand Forum in Auckland earlier this week. The forum included the awards dinner and ceremony mentioned above. Many of the awards went to Bay of Plenty organisations...
Biosecurity Forum; celebrating success and partnering to protect
15 November 2018

KVH attended the Biosecurity New Zealand Forum in Auckland earlier this week. The forum included the awards dinner and ceremony mentioned above. Many of the awards went to Bay of Plenty organisations which was an excellent outcome for the region, but the supreme winner was Environment Southland which won for its Fiordland Marine Regional Pathway Plan, developed to reduce the risk of pests entering Fiordland. This pioneering project has created the first biosecurity pathway plan in New Zealand, which Environment Southland is using to protect one of New Zealand’s most unique areas from pests entering on local and visiting vessels.

The theme of this year’s forum was “Biosecurity: Partnering to protect” which underlined the need for us all to connect and align our efforts to ensure our biosecurity system remains world-leading.  A number of keynote presentations looked to the future and how we can take action to achieve a necessary level of protection.

The challenges ahead are significant. Lyn O’Connoll, the Deputy Secretary of Australia’s Agriculture and Water Resources, said biosecurity risk to Australia was expected to increase by over 70% in the next 20 years given the volumes and complexities of modern trade, changes in climate and environment, businesses’ focus on short-term profits, and the spread of pests and diseases around the world. If this increase were to occur, investment in biosecurity would need to triple just to maintain Australia’s current level of protection. These were sobering thoughts from Australia and described a scenario which is likely to apply here as well.

However, there was plenty of inspiration as well. A common theme was that biosecurity seems to have entered a new era – there were many exciting new projects and innovative approaches on display and recognised at the awards night.

The second day of the forum was dedicated to taking action, starting with the launch of the Biosecurity 2025 Implementation Plan and a series of workshops to identify how we transition ideas into tangible actions.

The forum was opened by the new Director General of MPI, Ray Smith, who stayed throughout the event to understand the challenges and opportunities for MPI in managing biosecurity risk to New Zealand.

You can find out more about the biosecurity winners here

Biosecurity News
15 November 2018
Pampas seed causing problems - destroy pampas plants now
15 November 2018
There has been a significant increase in the number of pampas seeds detected on fruit in the 2018 packing season. Any seed attached to fruit is a reject factor and may cause market...
Pampas seed causing problems - destroy pampas plants now
15 November 2018

There has been a significant increase in the number of pampas seeds detected on fruit in the 2018 packing season. Any seed attached to fruit is a reject factor and may cause market access issues if found within a shipment or container.  Pampas seed “finds” went from 50 in 2016 to 543 in 2018. Almost all seed contaminating fruit was found to have been from the very invasive South American grass-like plant known as pampas (Cortaderia selloana, C. jubata).

Pampas is well-established in most regions where kiwifruit is grown and will be in full-flower in February-May. The seeds (more than 100,000 per flowerhead) will be dispersed by strong winds - any pampas growing in or adjacent to kiwifruit orchards can cause problems. If pampas is growing in your orchard or shelter belt, destroy it now - before it flowers. Plants can be dug out or removed by a digger; mulched by a heavy mulching mower; or sprayed with glyphosate herbicide at 1 part to 100 parts water. Adding an additional amount of surfactant/spreader will assist translocation of the herbicide into the pampas leaves. Follow all precautions to prevent spray drift. Do not attempt to spray pampas in an orchard if fruit has formed on vines. If fruit is present in the orchard, then cut the flower heads from pampas plants and destroy by burning or burial.

Above: Pampus

Below: Toetoe

Pampas is different from the native toetoe in that:

  • pampas has an upright growth habit rather than the more prostrate toetoe;
  • pampas flowers in late summer-autumn – toetoe flowers in early spring;
  • pampas has a different shaped, larger flowerhead: it is upright and cone-shaped rather than the limp-flag flower of the native toetoe; 
  • pampas generally grows faster than toetoe;
  • pampas is very invasive, is a declared pest plant in many regions and is causing problems for kiwifruit;
  • toetoe is a native plant and not often found adjacent to orchards.  It is not causing any problems to kiwifruit.

KVH is talking to road and rail authorities to request pampas control in the transport corridors.

Email John Mather at KVH if you would like any further information: john.mather@kvh.org.nz

Biosecurity News
1 November 2018
Be careful when importing seeds
1 November 2018
We were pleased to see a column in the NZ Herald last week from Federated Farmers highlighting the importance of following the law when importing any seed. Whether you’re a home gardener or...
Be careful when importing seeds
1 November 2018

We were pleased to see a column in the NZ Herald last week from Federated Farmers highlighting the importance of following the law when importing any seed.

Whether you’re a home gardener or large company importing stock, everyone needs to make sure they meet all requirements.

KVH is aware of international websites offering several varieties of kiwifruit for sale. This is concerning not only because buying seeds online for import into New Zealand could risk introducing a plant disease, but also because websites are often falsely declaring contents on the packaging. For example, we mentioned in an August Bulletin that lab test results from packages sold as ‘purple hearts kiwifruit’ online and sent to New Zealand (which then became known to KVH, so we had them delivered to us for formal reporting and testing) confirmed the seeds were of course not purple kiwifruit, and a number were seeds from entirely different plants.

There are strict rules around importing any kiwifruit seed:

-          seed intended for growing requires a permit to import and a phytosanitary certificate

-          it must be imported into post entry quarantine where it will be grown and checked for a range of viruses and other plant disease organisms

-          no seeds will be given biosecurity clearance; only plants which have been inspected and tested will be eligible for clearance.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) enforces all requirements and investigates any report of kiwifruit plants grown from unapproved seed imports. Please alert MPI if you aware of any unapproved seed imports by calling the pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66.

 

Biosecurity News
1 November 2018
Building biosecurity capability through education
1 November 2018
KVH attended a pilot programme in the Hawkes Bay this week to help test and provide feedback on a recently developed New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) micro-credential on biosecurity. ...
Building biosecurity capability through education
1 November 2018

KVH attended a pilot programme in the Hawkes Bay this week to help test and provide feedback on a recently developed New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) micro-credential on biosecurity.

Micro-credentials, also known as badges, nanocredentials and nano-degrees, recognise the achievement of a defined set of skills and knowledge. Learning undertaken is validated in a micro-credential and is important in itself (not simply as a stepping stone to any subsequent qualification).

This biosecurity micro-credential was developed under the NZQA framework (Level 5) by the Primary Industry Training Organisation (ITO) and Horticulture NZ, with input from biosecurity managers from KVH, Summerfruit New Zealand, New Zealand Apples & Pears, New Zealand Winegrowers, TomatoesNZ and Vegetables New Zealand.


The focused course is designed to enhance industry biosecurity capability, and targets grower owner-operators and supervisors/managers. Content builds an understanding of biosecurity and provides a framework to identify, prioritise, and manage biosecurity risks on orchards and farms.

A second test pilot was held in Nelson with two kiwifruit industry representatives attending. Feedback to the organisers will ensure the course is relevant to industry.

Biosecurity News
1 November 2018
In the news
1 November 2018
Tauranga pioneers’ new approach to biosecurity threats, could be implemented nationwide: Iwi, businesses, and local and central government have come together through the Tauranga Moana...
In the news
1 November 2018

Tauranga pioneers’ new approach to biosecurity threats, could be implemented nationwide: Iwi, businesses, and local and central government have come together through the Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital programme to help educate the public on biosecurity risks on our own doorsteps.

BMSB threat to Bay's billion-dollar kiwifruit industry: A 260% increase in the number of Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) found at New Zealand's borders has heightened a billion-dollar risk to the Bay of Plenty economy. In Italy the bugs have been found to cause up to 40% drop in kiwifruit prior to harvest.

Biosecurity Award finalists reflect huge national effort in biosecurity: KVH is honoured to represent kiwifruit as a finalist in the industry category at the New Zealand Biosecurity Awards. The awards were established two years ago to recognise and celebrate exemplary contributions to protecting our taonga (precious natural resources) and ensuring New Zealand's biosecurity system remains resilient, effective, and world-leading.

Biosecurity News
18 October 2018
No fruit fly interceptions
18 October 2018
Latest border interception information on fruit flies has been published in the October KVH risk update, showing that our biggest threat – the Queensland Fruit Fly – hasn’t been...
No fruit fly interceptions
18 October 2018

Latest border interception information on fruit flies has been published in the October KVH risk update, showing that our biggest threat – the Queensland Fruit Fly – hasn’t been found at all since the start of the high-risk season which was 1 September 2018.

The new risk update also details the national fruit fly surveillance programme, which involves almost 8,000 pheromone traps checked on a fortnightly basis.

There were several fruit fly interceptions at the border over the summer period last year. Be vigilant and keep watch. While it may be possible to find on fruit trees if present, a better option is to look out for any larvae in fruit, including tree fallen fruit.

If you hear of someone that has accidently bought fruit or vegetables into New Zealand, make sure it is reported to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and then appropriately destroyed. Bagged and put in the rubbish is the best way, not composted. 

Biosecurity News
18 October 2018
Fewer Psa infection risk events to date for Te Puke
18 October 2018
When spring 2018 rainfall and Psa infection event data from Plant and Food Research’s Te Puke Research Station is compared against 2016 and 2017 data, it shows less than half the rainfall has...
Fewer Psa infection risk events to date for Te Puke
18 October 2018

When spring 2018 rainfall and Psa infection event data from Plant and Food Research’s Te Puke Research Station is compared against 2016 and 2017 data, it shows less than half the rainfall has fallen, Psa infection events have been fewer and infection events have also been less severe. View the data in easy to read graphs here.

This relatively dry weather since budburst has resulted in fewer Psa symptoms being reported, with this pattern similar in other regions also.  There are always exceptions though and growers should continue to respond to their individual orchard risk.

Labour weekend often brings the first signs of Hayward leafspot and growers should watch the Psa risk model. Take advantage of good spray windows to apply ongoing protection before high-risk periods. Similarly, dry spells are ideal for applying preflower girdles to green blocks with a history of flower-bud infection. Correct timing is 30 days before flowering.

Biosecurity News
18 October 2018
Regional pest plan consultation
18 October 2018
The submission period is currently open for the Proposed Regional Pest Management Plan for the Bay of Plenty region.  The Plan sets out which pests will be managed by the Bay of Plenty Regional...
Regional pest plan consultation
18 October 2018

The submission period is currently open for the Proposed Regional Pest Management Plan for the Bay of Plenty region.  The Plan sets out which pests will be managed by the Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC) and the approach taken for each.  

KVH and NZKGI will be submitting on the proposed Plan and will likely comment on the management approach towards wild kiwifruit, pampas, moth plant and woolly nightshade.  KVH works closely with BOPRC to co-manage pests such as wild kiwifruit, a very successful programme and a great example of industry and local government working together to protect the environment and reduce biosecurity risk to orchards.  

Any person or organisation can submit on the proposed Plan – visit the BOPRC website for more information.  Submissions close Tuesday 6 November 2018.

Biosecurity News
18 October 2018
Training the next generation of stink bug hunters
18 October 2018
This week KVH helped bring biosecurity alive for groups of intermediate students taking part in the Creepy Crawlies Meets Primary Production project. For two field-days, students were introduced to...
Training the next generation of stink bug hunters
18 October 2018

This week KVH helped bring biosecurity alive for groups of intermediate students taking part in the Creepy Crawlies Meets Primary Production project.

For two field-days, students were introduced to kiwifruit and avocados as great industries and future career options and were shown science and technology at work. Grading and packing, checking out pests under microscopes, and learning about drone spraying taught students what it takes to produce and sell an export crop. These activities were built on Curious Minds modules developed by Scion and the Tauranga branch of House of Science.

The KVH team headed into the orchard to train and recruit teams of students responsible for hunting down stink bugs, and to talk about how important it is we have a team of 4.7 million to defend our industry against biosecurity risks. Students searched for life-sized stickers of native brown and green stink bugs in the orchard and learnt to catch, snap and report the “big bad” Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and Yellow Spotted Stink Bug (YSSB). Aleise Puketapu from Plant and Food Research joined the team and thrilled the students with live green vegetable bug adults and nymphs and some very stinky dead bugs. Check the KVH Facebook page for a live photo reaction to the smell.

The event was organised by Scion and House of Science and was funded by the Unlocking Curious Minds programme with co-funding from BioHeritage, NZ Avocados and in-kind support from Trevelyans, KVH and Heli Resources.

Biosecurity News
18 October 2018
Creating more Mauao guardians
18 October 2018
A team of Mauao kaitiaki (guardians) will be offering free training this weekend to help keep myrtle rust off the Mount Maunganui landmark. Pohutukawa trees that encircle the beachside mountain are...
Creating more Mauao guardians
18 October 2018

A team of Mauao kaitiaki (guardians) will be offering free training this weekend to help keep myrtle rust off the Mount Maunganui landmark.

Pohutukawa trees that encircle the beachside mountain are susceptible to myrtle rust, as are resident manuka and kanuka. The fungal disease can affect flowers, shoots and leaves, maiming and sometimes killing the plant itself.

As part of Biosecurity Week activities, this Saturday 20 October from 10am-midday, Tauranga Moana iwi and other conservationists will help show the public what to look for and what to do if they find infected plants. All growers, friends and family are welcome to attend. People will gather at the Pilot Bay end of the camping ground, close to the public toilets. Read more here.

Biosecurity News
18 October 2018
Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital launch week
18 October 2018
On Tuesday Minister for Biosecurity, Damien O’Connor, joined local business and community leaders and biosecurity personnel at the official launch of the newly formed Tauranga Moana Biosecurity...
Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital launch week
18 October 2018

On Tuesday Minister for Biosecurity, Damien O’Connor, joined local business and community leaders and biosecurity personnel at the official launch of the newly formed Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC).

About 100 representatives from 19 organisations in the region attended the launch and symposium, including KVH, Zespri, post-harvest, Port of Tauranga, the three local councils and local iwi. The Minister was welcomed with a powhiri and spoke to attendees about his view on TMBC being a show of unity and co-operation, where communities within a region are taking on the responsibility of what he sees as New Zealand’s number one challenge – biosecurity.

Guests on the day heard inspiring stories and case studies and were involved in interactive workshops as well as a detector dog demonstration that included Georgie, the labrador trained and dedicated to sniffing out Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB), one of the biggest threats to the kiwifruit industry and local area.

Following on from the launch, the TMBC Biosecurity Week is underway, with a series of local activities celebrating biosecurity awareness and the role everyone in the community plays in protecting our local environment and economy from biosecurity threats. For the kiwifruit industry this included todays Kiwifruit Biosecurity Grower Day, covering readiness activities; research into soil borne diseases and the importance of traceability; BMSB preparedness; and an outdoor drone demonstration as part of a Scion project to create a toolkit for biosecrity responses in urban environments.

KVH has been running the Port of Tauranga Biosecurity Excellence programme, which involves the Port, KVH and the Ministry for Primary Inustries (MPI) working with Port staff and contractors during the week to raise awareness of the importance of best-practice when it comes to biosecurity vigilance, what pests to be on the lookout for, and how to report unusual finds. This year KVH has visited around 100 people at the Port to share information and learn more about what we can do as an industry to help raise awareness even more.

Staff from KVH are also part of the free training this weekend to help keep myrtle rust off Mauao and have been out in the field the last few days with students learning all about on-orchard bug hunting as part of a joint programme to build horticulture and biosecurity awareness in local schools

Biosecurity News
4 October 2018
Cruise operators help keep pests out
4 October 2018
KVH attended the annual pre-cruise season meeting at the Port of Tauranga last week to raise awareness of biosecurity and the partnership between the Port, KVH, and the Ministry for Primary...
Cruise operators help keep pests out
4 October 2018

KVH attended the annual pre-cruise season meeting at the Port of Tauranga last week to raise awareness of biosecurity and the partnership between the Port, KVH, and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) aiming for biosecurity excellence.

Along with senior and operational Port staff; MPI; Customs; tours and transport officials; regional tourism and council staff were also at the meeting to talk through run plans for the busy summer season ahead. This was the perfect opportunity for KVH to build on bus driver visits last year and make biosecurity a standing item on this group’s meeting agenda.

There are 113 ships stopping at the Port over the summer (the first arriving tomorrow, Friday 5 October) and since the meeting KVH has provided all bus drivers with information about biosecurity that they can share with their customers, including pre-written intercom messages and instructions for passengers if they are on a tour that stops in at a kiwifruit orchard.

This summer KVH is stocking the Mount Maunganui and Cruise Terminal i-Sites with biosecurity flyers raising awareness about high-risk pest threats (mainly BMSB) potentially hitchhiking their way across our borders. The i-Sites double as ticketing offices and are often the first point of call for visitors and cruise ship passengers wanting to know more about the region and plan their time here.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz