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Biosecurity News
23 March 2017
Stink bug risk remains high
23 March 2017
We’re still in the high-risk period for BMSB, the kiwifruit industry’s second most unwanted biosecurity threat (after fruit flies) so please do continue to make use of the resources...
Stink bug risk remains high
23 March 2017

We’re still in the high-risk period for BMSB, the kiwifruit industry’s second most unwanted biosecurity threat (after fruit flies) so please do continue to make use of the resources developed by KVH as part of the nationwide effort to keep this unwanted pest out.

Popular resources include a video on the KVH website from the USA, where the ever-expanding stink bug population is taking over lifestyles (it’s useful to share with staff, friends and family as everyone will be affected if it establishes here) and a simple guide to identification that you can read here on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
23 March 2017
Remove flowering Pampas from kiwifruit orchards
23 March 2017
The invasive South American plant, Pampas, is well-established in most regions where kiwifruit is grown.  Pampas has now begun to flower and the seeds (more than 100,000 per flowerhead) will be...
Remove flowering Pampas from kiwifruit orchards
23 March 2017

The invasive South American plant, Pampas, is well-established in most regions where kiwifruit is grown.  Pampas has now begun to flower and the seeds (more than 100,000 per flowerhead) will be dispersed by strong winds.  Any Pampas growing in, or adjacent, to kiwifruit orchards can be a problem in that any seed attached to fruit is a reject factor, and may cause market access issues if found within a shipment or container.

If Pampas is established in your orchard or shelter belt, cut down and destroy the flowerheads now. 

Pampas plants can be dug out or removed by a digger, or controlled with glyphosate herbicide.  A surfactant/spreader needs to be added to the herbicide mixture. Do not attempt to spray Pampas in an orchard if fruit are still on vines. 

Pampas (Cortaderia selloana or C. jubata) is different from the native toetoe (Cortaderia fulvida) in that Pampas grows faster and is an invasive plant; it flowers in autumn rather than spring; is more robust and upright; and produces a different shaped and larger flowerhead (cone-shaped rather than flag-like). 

Contact John Mather at KVH at john.mather@kvh.org.nz if you would like any further information.

Biosecurity News
23 March 2017
Keep the reports coming
23 March 2017
We often get phone calls and emails from members of the public and growers who think they may have found a pest or bug from our most unwanted list. This is a good thing – it’s exactly the...
Keep the reports coming
23 March 2017

We often get phone calls and emails from members of the public and growers who think they may have found a pest or bug from our most unwanted list. This is a good thing – it’s exactly the type of behaviour we want to see as it shows people are on the lookout and aware of not just biosecurity risk in general, but also of the look and size of the organisms that are considered the highest risk to the kiwifruit industry.

A lot of people are on orchards for harvest at this time of the year so we’re getting an increased number of reports – six so far this week infact. They have all turned out to be native brown soldier bugs which are very similar but can be differentiated because they’re much smaller.

The message remains the same for growers, contractors and anyone else on-orchard: stay vigilant, be on the lookout, and report anything unusual. Please take a photo (very rarely will we need to see the actual specimen) of what you find and send it to us at info@kvh.org.nz so we can have a look at it for you. Don’t be afraid to report any suspect finds – the sooner you alert us the more we can do to help.

Biosecurity News
9 March 2017
Japan update: biosecurity similarities
9 March 2017
On a recent trip back to New Zealand, Zespri’s Japan supply manager Bryan McGillivray shared insights on the spread of Psa and other unwanted pests in Japan with Zespri colleagues and...
Japan update: biosecurity similarities
9 March 2017

On a recent trip back to New Zealand, Zespri’s Japan supply manager Bryan McGillivray shared insights on the spread of Psa and other unwanted pests in Japan with Zespri colleagues and KVH.

Bryan said, since Psa3 (the previously called Psa-V) arrived in Japan in 2014, it developed and spread through the Japanese kiwifruit industry as it did here. Climatic differences such as Japan’s hotter summers had reduced the pace of the spread of Psa somewhat. Of Japan’s 2,177 hectares of kiwifruit, around 69% is now infected with Psa3.
 
As in New Zealand, Hort16A has been most affected by the Psa and blocks are being removed as they become uneconomic. Southern areas of Japan remain free of Psa and movement controls are in place to help protect orchards.
 
Some potential biosecurity threats to New Zealand are already present in Japan providing an opportunity to learn how growers manage these pests and what else should be on our radar as emerging risks to our industry. The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one such example, a pest of significant concern to us, yet in Japan where it is native, impacts do not seem to be significant.
 
This is thought to be because the samurai wasp is also native to Japan, and parasitises BMSB eggs keeping populations in check. The good experience from Japan tells us this could be an effective control tool to have so KVH and other horticultural industries are seeking pre-approval to release the samurai wasp as a biocontrol agent should BMSB ever establish here. 
 
KVH has an information-sharing relationship with Bryan’s team in Japan, which will ensure both organisations stay abreast of pest developments and potential new research opportunities across the two countries.    
 
Biosecurity News
9 March 2017
Report suspected finds
9 March 2017
Remember, there are only small market access implications from Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) but the production impact is vast. The sooner you alert us, the more we can do to help you. Early...
Report suspected finds
9 March 2017

Remember, there are only small market access implications from Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) but the production impact is vast. The sooner you alert us, the more we can do to help you. Early detection is key to eradication – if we don’t report and miss this window BMSB could be a challenge we have to deal with forever.

Please keep an eye out for any unusual pests and call us on 0800 665 825 or send us photographs to info@kvh.org.nz if you find anything of concern. An updated fact sheet on BMSB can be found on the KVH website.
 
Biosecurity News
23 February 2017
Keep it up!
23 February 2017
KVH is so grateful for the vigilance of the members of the public who identified pests and alerted MPI. We have also had a Gisborne kiwifruit grower send through photographs of some...
Keep it up!
23 February 2017

KVH is so grateful for the vigilance of the members of the public who identified pests and alerted MPI. We have also had a Gisborne kiwifruit grower send through photographs of some suspicious-looking nymphs this week. Thankfully, we were able to identify these as the New Zealand native Pittosporum Shield Bug. It is great to have the support of the public in keeping these problematic pests out of New Zealand.

 
KVH, MPI and other GIA signatories are working on a number of initiatives to reduce the risk of BMSB including:
 
  1. Readiness and Response arrangements under GIA – establishing what we need to do to prepare for this threat, how we respond and how we share costs.
  2. Research efforts to mitigate risk and impact - KVH is a member of the MPI/Industry research group that oversees R&D focus and priorities. Three priorities are developing effective traps and pheromones, ACVM approval of effective sprays and assessing biological control options. One of these biological control options is promising and we aim to have pre-emptive approval for release later this year, meaning that if BMSB were to establish we would have a control tool at our disposal.
  3. Working with importers - KVH is visiting importers of machinery such as graders, mulchers and tractors, to ensure staff are aware of biosecurity hygiene and what pests to keep an eye out for.
  4. Communications to increase the likelihood of early detection – KVH is co-funding a BMSB communications campaign with MPI and other GIA partners, to raise public awareness and increase the likelihood of early detection through passive surveillance. The campaign includes digital and print advertising deployed through a number of channels targeting potential pathway entries for BMSB. This includes passenger (e-ticket advertising, and signage at Auckland International Airport), mail (advertising targeting overseas shopping on eBay and NZ Post) and industry partners, magazines and journals. KVH is strengthening awareness within the kiwifruit industry, associated industries such as the Port of Tauranga and the freight and logistics sector, and with members of the public. This includes school and polytechnic presentations visits utilising our display specimens, Bulletin & Kiwifruit Journal articles, fridge magnets, calendars, wall planners, and presentations at Zespri Roadshows (updates included at upcoming Roadshows next week).
 
Growers are a key line of defence – you are best-placed to spot invaders early on. Please keep an eye out for any unusual pests and call us on 0800 665 825 or send us photographs to info@kvh.org.nz if you find anything of concern. An updated fact sheet on BMSB can be found on the KVH website.
Biosecurity News
23 February 2017
Other border news
23 February 2017
• MPI screened 684,407 air passengers for biosecurity risk in January, an increase of more than 10% (64,121) from January 2016. It intercepted some 12,600 biosecurity risk items in January. Of...
Other border news
23 February 2017
• MPI screened 684,407 air passengers for biosecurity risk in January, an increase of more than 10% (64,121) from January 2016. It intercepted some 12,600 biosecurity risk items in January. Of these, 1,829 were undeclared.
 
• As well as an increase in the number of travellers, MPI has also seen an increase in the number of travellers bringing food into New Zealand. This not only presents a biosecurity risk, it can also take hours to process which consumes precious border resources. A traveller from Malaysia recently declared a suitcase full of food, in which MPI found four mangoes infested with fruit fly larvae.
 
• MPI reports that its new cruise ship accreditation scheme is working well to improve passenger compliance. The seizure rate from accredited vessels is half of that of unaccredited. Vessels can achieve accreditation by demonstrating they manage biosecurity risk; they benefit by receiving faster passenger processing. So far this year there have been 216 risk items seized from cruise ships. Most interceptions involved fresh produce (56 percent), which has the potential to host fruit fly.
 
• MPI has introduced tougher scrutiny for Transitional Facilities (an importer that can unload containers on their premises). It is now unlikely to approve new applications for TFs that plan to receive fewer than 10 containers a year. KVH supports this move as part of a wider effort to improve biosecurity management on these pathways.
 
• Research in the United States has shown that dogs can be trained to sniff out BMSB so MPI has been conducting trials to train dogs here in New Zealand. If successful, this will be a valuable tool for use in any future incursions.
Biosecurity News
23 February 2017
Red alert for stink bug
23 February 2017
MPI has been investigating two recent discoveries of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). Both investigations relate to single adults found in hotel rooms by staff. One was found in Whitianga and the...
Red alert for stink bug
23 February 2017
MPI has been investigating two recent discoveries of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). Both investigations relate to single adults found in hotel rooms by staff. One was found in Whitianga and the other in New Plymouth. The discoveries appear to be unrelated. Investigators have concluded each bug hitch-hiked in luggage with travellers from the United States. In each case, MPI investigators and survey teams have found no further individuals.
 
BMSB is a serious horticultural pest, considered number 2 on Kiwifruit’s Most Unwanted biosecurity threats (after fruit fly). There are no market access impacts from this pest, however, it can cause serious production impacts, including fruit loss reported to be in the region of 30 percent.
 
These investigations reflect the fact BMSB pressure at the border has been at an all-time high this summer. MPI staff have intercepted a record number of both dead and live bugs.
 
  • MPI says there have been 44 separate BMSB “interception events” this summer, of which 38 involved containers from Italy. Some of these interception events contained numerous individuals. While the majority were dead, almost 30 percent were alive on arrival.
  • BMSB is currently undergoing a population explosion in Europe, similar to the situation in the United States 5 to 10 years ago. These detections reflect that shift in risk and will be of particular interest to kiwifruit growers because of the industry’s links to Europe. We must be vigilant when receiving any visitors or imports from Italy. 
Biosecurity News
9 February 2017
Post-harvest Biosecurity for Packhouses
9 February 2017
The post-harvest protocols have been updated for 2017 and are now available on the KVH website.  Postharvest Biosecurity Risk Management Plans must be signed off before harvest commences this...
Post-harvest Biosecurity for Packhouses
9 February 2017
The post-harvest protocols have been updated for 2017 and are now available on the KVH website.  Postharvest Biosecurity Risk Management Plans must be signed off before harvest commences this season. The plans must be submitted to KVH by Monday 27th February. Please email these to karyn.lowry@kvh.org.nz
 
All bins in all regions must be clear of plant material and sanitised pre-season and between orchards. For sanitiser options refer to KVH Information Sheet: Sanitisers.
 
There are additional requirements for postharvest operators moving bins between regions. Refer to KVH Protocol: Fruit Bins.
 
Biosecurity News
9 February 2017
White Peach Scale notification
9 February 2017
We’ve had an excellent response to our calls for vigilance when handling imported fruit.    On February 3, the KVH team received a call from an importer who suspected White Peach...
White Peach Scale notification
9 February 2017
We’ve had an excellent response to our calls for vigilance when handling imported fruit. 
 
On February 3, the KVH team received a call from an importer who suspected White Peach Scale on some Italian fruit. We worked with Plant and Food Research to verify that it was White Peach Scale – a pest which is currently not present in NZ - all scale were dead.   The pallet of fruit in question had been fumigated prior to Christmas. MPI fumigated fewer lines of Italian kiwifruit this year than last; a reflection on the lower incidence of White Peach Scale identified at the border this year. 
 
It is gratifying to see industry vigilance in identifying and reporting this pest and that the border controls in place are offering effective protection to the industry. If you need a reminder on how to handle sightings of what you suspect might be damaging pests on imported fruit, have a look at our biosecurity poster
 
Biosecurity News
9 February 2017
Queensland Fruit Fly Australian visit
9 February 2017
At the end of January, KVH chief executive Barry O’Neil visited Sydney Fruit Fly University Researchers. He travelled with MPI’s GIA Manager Steve Rich. They met formally with the...
Queensland Fruit Fly Australian visit
9 February 2017
At the end of January, KVH chief executive Barry O’Neil visited Sydney Fruit Fly University Researchers. He travelled with MPI’s GIA Manager Steve Rich. They met formally with the Australian National Fruit Fly Council to better understand the issues and approach Australians are taking in the control of Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF). Barry and Steve also wanted to identify areas for collaboration, including joint research efforts for combined interests in the battle against QFF.  
 
Barry says: “QFF is the No 1 risk on our industry’s unwanted biosecurity threat list. Last year we entered into a partnership with MPI and other horticulture sectors to ensure we are doing everything we can to continue to keep New Zealand QFF-free.  This agreement is not just about being fully ready to respond, but also looking at how we can improve our current approach”. 
 
He says it’s naturally not a scenario anyone wants to entertain, but if New Zealand ever ended up with a large breeding population of QFF the Australian experience would prove valuable. “We would need to consider use of sterile males as is happening in Australia, and is common practice around the world in countries were fruit fly present.”
 
Female fruit fly only mate once, so once large numbers of sterile males are released the population collapses. 
 
Meetings at Macquarie University ARC Centre for fruit fly research and the Elizabeth Macarthur Agriculture Institute, which currently rears the sterile males, provided a better understanding of the role sterile males could play in a New Zealand eradication program in the future and the arrangements that would be needed. 
 
Biosecurity News
26 January 2017
Preparing for fruit fly
26 January 2017
KVH and the other signatories who signed the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies, last year agreed on the approach to readiness and response activities. While getting to this point was a...
Preparing for fruit fly
26 January 2017


KVH and the other signatories who signed the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies, last year agreed on the approach to readiness and response activities. While getting to this point was a significant achievement in itself, it has also led to a review of areas that can be improved.

A technical working group has been established to progress the readiness and response technical improvements that have been agreed, of which the priorities are;
  • Optimising the current surveillance programme for early detection. New Zealand maintains a world class surveillance grid for fruit fly that involves over 7500 traps, which has successfully resulted in early detection of fruit fly on nine occasions enabling eradication.  But are there opportunities for further improvement, including locations, period, and lures that are used in the traps?
  • Pre-agreeing the major risks in a response and identifying opportunities to reduce cost associated with low risk activities.  Examples during the Grey Lynn response include managing risk associated with major sporting events and supermarkets located within the controlled area.  Understanding true risk associated with these activities will enable us to manage the risks appropriately.
  • Reviewing the current Fruit Fly Response Standard. Are there opportunities to enhance this standard using new technology or best practice developed internationally, or our own learnings from recent responses?  Are there any activities that are not required which could result in a future eradication being undertaken successfully, without having to spend $1.5 million responding to the detection of a single fruit fly?
KVH is well represented in this process, with Barry O’Neil serving as chairman of the Fruit Fly Council which oversees the Operational Agreement, and Matt Dyck as an observer on the Technical Working Group tasked with delivering projects to improve our readiness and response capability.
 
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Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz