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Biosecurity News
13 July 2017
Stink bug agreement signed
13 July 2017
An agreement which focuses on avoiding the damaging aspects of a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) incursion was signed this afternoon by KVH with other horticultural groups and the Ministry for...
Stink bug agreement signed
13 July 2017

An agreement which focuses on avoiding the damaging aspects of a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) incursion was signed this afternoon by KVH with other horticultural groups and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), at the Horticulture Conference.

The agreement, under the Government Industry Agreement for Biosecurity readiness and response (GIA) sets out the operational requirements for readiness and response activities and cost-sharing arrangements between Government and affected industries in the management of the BMSB threat. It enables joint decision-making between the parties and sees them all working together to reduce the impacts of BMSB to affected industries.

A summary of the agreement is available on the KVH website.

BMSB is number two on our Kiwifruit’s Most Unwanted list, and it’s a serious pest to horticulture as well as the public. In the USA, the ever-expanding BMSB population is considered a nuisance pest, infesting homes and taking over lifestyles.




In addition to the agreement signed today, a KVH work programme is well underway with Zespri so the kiwifruit industry will be as fully prepared as possible in the event of an incursion. This includes looking at how decisions will be made around operational/field activities, how information will be shared with growers, and how we can ensure other industries are kept informed of our activities.

The next high-risk season for BMSB is only weeks away. Visit the BMSB page of the KVH website for more information, video, and fact sheets about this unwanted pest.

Biosecurity News
13 July 2017
Support for biosecurity prosecution
13 July 2017
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) announced late last week the conviction of a Christchurch firm for submitting a false declaration that could have created a serious biosecurity...
Support for biosecurity prosecution
13 July 2017

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) announced late last week the conviction of a Christchurch firm for submitting a false declaration that could have created a serious biosecurity breach.

The customs broking firm prosecuted by MPI falsely declared that the header unit of an imported combine harvester was new when it was in fact used. When inspected by officials and effectively cleaned, the waste from the header filled three 240-litre containers.

KVH is supportive of the action taken by MPI, not only because there could have been serious biosecurity impacts resulting from the contamination (potentially impacting any primary or horticultural sector industry), but also because it demonstrates that the system is working and does pick up on inconsistencies like incorrect paperwork.

We also support even stronger action being taken by MPI in situations where rules are disregarded, including rejecting the importation of uncleaned machinery altogether.

There are strict rules in place for importing vehicles and equipment to ensure they are free from harmful pests and diseases. KVH and other industry groups have been reiteraring this with importers of machinery and machinery parts, particularly in light of the threat of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), and most recently at Fieldays.

Biosecurity News
29 June 2017
Hawkes Bay: Psa Recovery region
29 June 2017
Following the identification of a number of additional Psa-V positive orchards and a grower meeting to discuss regional classification, the Hawkes Bay region will soon move from a Containment...
Hawkes Bay: Psa Recovery region
29 June 2017

Following the identification of a number of additional Psa-V positive orchards and a grower meeting to discuss regional classification, the Hawkes Bay region will soon move from a Containment region to a Recovery region under the National Pest Management Plan (NPMP).

The KVH Board approved the change at their June meeting and it will come into effect from 1 July.

All New Zealand kiwifruit-growing regions are classified as Exclusion, Containment or Recovery, based on the level of Psa-V infection.  A Recovery region is a region already widespread with the disease.

More information on regional classifications, including maps, is available on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
29 June 2017
Importance of monitoring and Psa control programmes
29 June 2017
A recent resistance workshop has highlighted the value of ongoing monitoring programmes and the need for a comprehensive Psa control programme. Hosted by KVH and Zespri, the workshop was held...
Importance of monitoring and Psa control programmes
29 June 2017

A recent resistance workshop has highlighted the value of ongoing monitoring programmes and the need for a comprehensive Psa control programme.

Hosted by KVH and Zespri, the workshop was held earlier this week with representatives from the science community and agrichemical companies to discuss the ongoing evolution of copper resistance Psa and how we best respond to this.

The resistance monitoring programme has enabled us to detect resistance Psa bacteria early, and to identify the mechanisms/changes that led to this resistance. This means we have an opportunity to learn more about the bacteria and how we best respond to the changes before the levels of resistance build and potentially impact Psa control on orchards.  Historically resistance is usually found when chemicals fail to control disease pressure, which can result in the loss of that compound from the control programme, something we can’t afford to have happen with Psa since we have so few control products available.

Although we have identified resistance Psa bacteria on orchards we have not seen control product failure, but the workshop agreed that continued intensive monitoring is important (on a selection of orchards) to better understand the rate of resistance development and risk to the industry.

It was also agreed that based on current knowledge, KVH Best Practice advice around Psa control to reduce resistance development is appropriate and should continue to be followed by growers. Further research areas were identified to enhance KVH’s recommendations.

KVH and Zespri are also focussing on finding additional control products to reduce reliance on copper over time.

 
Biosecurity News
29 June 2017
Summer stats from the border
29 June 2017
KVH works with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on several initiatives, including advocating for the strongest possible procedures and systems at our borders to help stop the arrival of...
Summer stats from the border
29 June 2017

KVH works with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on several initiatives, including advocating for the strongest possible procedures and systems at our borders to help stop the arrival of unwanted pests.

MPI recently released some statistics for the summer period (December to February) and the work that has been undertaken at airports in particular stands out.  It’s imperative that we keep up strong biosecurity procedures and were pleased to read that MPI is set to meet or exceed their 98.5% compliance target for arriving passengers. 

Of note to the kiwifruit industry, the statistics for the three-month summer period tell us:

• in the passenger space, there were no Queensland Fruit Fly Interceptions reported,
• there were 1059 cargo consignments targeted for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) inspection. This is 160% more than the previous year,
• there were 93 BMSB interception events in cargo, mainly on used equipment and machinery.

Interestingly, hand luggage is where almost 80% of fruit fly host material is found at the border. Specialist x-ray scanning technology for small bags that could make it much easier to identify risk items is being looked at and trials are expected soon.

KVH also regularly produces summarised risk updates for the most unwanted threats to kiwifruit, using the latest data and information from MPI. These are available on the KVH website (the most recent ones are for fruit fly and BMSB).

Biosecurity News
29 June 2017
New agreement for managing BMSB
29 June 2017
A new agreement between industry groups and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to help reduce the potential damaging impacts of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is due to be finalised...
New agreement for managing BMSB
29 June 2017

A new agreement between industry groups and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to help reduce the potential damaging impacts of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is due to be finalised and signed in mid-July.

The BMSB Operational Agreement has been developed under the Government Industry Agreement (GIA), which commits the kiwifruit industry - and others across the horticultural sector - to work with government to improve readiness for potential future biosecurity events and decide how all parties would jointly respond, including operational details and cost-sharing arrangements. You can read a summary of what the agreement will include on the KVH website.

The agreement has been negotiated and developed by a specially convened group including KVH on behalf of the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors.

Biosecurity News
29 June 2017
Biosecurity awards open
29 June 2017
The New Zealand Biosecurity Awards recognise and celebrate individuals who have made a positive difference to New Zealand biosecurity. Launched by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), the...
Biosecurity awards open
29 June 2017

The New Zealand Biosecurity Awards recognise and celebrate individuals who have made a positive difference to New Zealand biosecurity.

Launched by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), the awards support the objective in the Biosecurity 2025 Direction Statement to build a biosecurity team of 4.7 million New Zealanders – something we at KVH have been involved in developing and implementing.

The awards are open to everyone and there a number of different categories so if you (or your organisation/company) have been involved in a project or event that focuses on biosecurity, and you want to know more, visit the MPI website for details.

You might be biosecurity champions and not even know it! This is your opportunity to tell your story and share how you’ve made a difference in protecting the kiwifruit industry and/or the wider New Zealand environment and economy from biosecurity threats.

Get in quick – the closing date for entries is Friday 7 July 2017.

Biosecurity News
29 June 2017
Know what to look for with a free handy magnet
29 June 2017
As we mentioned in the last Bulletin, KVH was at Fieldays this year talking about the importance of biosecurity and the magnets we had to give away were very popular – people have told us...
Know what to look for with a free handy magnet
29 June 2017

As we mentioned in the last Bulletin, KVH was at Fieldays this year talking about the importance of biosecurity and the magnets we had to give away were very popular – people have told us they find the image of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) good to keep nearby so that they know exactly what to look out for.

We still have a few of these BMSB magnets left so please feel free to email us if you’d like some sent to you for work, home, staff, contractors or even a community event that you think would find them useful so that we can help spread the important message about knowing what to look out for and what to do if one of these bugs is found.

Biosecurity News
15 June 2017
Dutch kiwifruit grower reaches out for Psa assistance
15 June 2017
The Netherlands’ first kiwifruit grower has reached out to the New Zealand industry for advice in dealing with possible Psa symptoms. Multi award-winning Dutch businesswoman and...
Dutch kiwifruit grower reaches out for Psa assistance
15 June 2017

The Netherlands’ first kiwifruit grower has reached out to the New Zealand industry for advice in dealing with possible Psa symptoms.

Multi award-winning Dutch businesswoman and horticulturalist Djûke van der Maat grows half a hectare of northern Italian variety Greenlight and Tomori male at her family’s 28-hectare diversified farm in Bunnik, The Netherlands.

Djûke is a participant in this year’s Rabobank Global Farmer Master Class programme alongside grower Trish Jones. When Djûke discovered red exudate and shoot and cane wilt, she contacted Trish and her husband Paul for advice. They provided support and approached KVH and respected growers for additional information and insight.

The affected vines were immediately removed. KVH provided information on copper products and best practice. As the orchard was close to flowering, a low rate copper spray was advised. However implementation of the suggested products is difficult, because of availability and application regulations.

Test results are due back from a laboratory next week. Three weeks prior to discovery of the symptoms, the area had been hit by a severe frost. Temperatures on the site dropped to -7 degrees Celsius. Djûke uses frost pots but it is likely there was a degree of frost damage and some of those New Zealand growers who have been talking to Djuke thought there was a chance the frost could be to blame for the symptoms. Djûke is still hopeful that frost may turn out to be the cause. 

Biosecurity News
15 June 2017
KVH presents to Maori Kiwifruit Grower Forum
15 June 2017
Yesterday the Maori Kiwifruit Grower Forum was officially launched to advocate on behalf of these growers and ensure they are well informed of key issues. Biosecurity is one such issue and KVH...
KVH presents to Maori Kiwifruit Grower Forum
15 June 2017

Yesterday the Maori Kiwifruit Grower Forum was officially launched to advocate on behalf of these growers and ensure they are well informed of key issues.

Biosecurity is one such issue and KVH presented to the group to seek their support in our bid for Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval to release a biocontrol agent, should one day the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) establish in New Zealand.

BMSB is a significant threat to kiwifruit and horticultural industries given that it is highly likely to enter our borders and establish here, causes significant impacts to horticultural industries and also to the public by infesting their homes, and is extremely difficult to control requiring frequent applications of toxic insecticides.

However, in countries where BMSB is native, a biocontrol exists that keeps BMSB populations in check by parasitising their eggs. This is the Samurai midge (Trissolcus japonicus) which has been the subject of intense research and host testing in both New Zealand and the USA to determine its suitability as a biocontrol agent. This process is nearly complete and we hope to have an EPA decision by September of this year. 

Biosecurity News
15 June 2017
BMSB readiness update
15 June 2017
While a biocontrol agent is considered the most effective control tool against Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), KVH is also working closely with Zespri to ensure that we are doing everything we can...
BMSB readiness update
15 June 2017

While a biocontrol agent is considered the most effective control tool against Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), KVH is also working closely with Zespri to ensure that we are doing everything we can across the supply chain to reduce the impact of this pest.

KVH and Zespri have established a working group to progress a Kiwifruit BMSB Readiness Plan. This plan identifies activities to mitigate impacts of BMSB across the supply chain and has an associated workplan to ensure these activities become viable in the near future.

The workplan has been given a high priority in both organisations and the readiness plan is expected to be largely complete with only long-term research and development outstanding, by September this year.

A simulation will be held before the next high-risk period, to test the practicalities of this plan with KiwiNet, our industry biosecurity champions. 

Biosecurity News
15 June 2017
Myrtle rust in Te Puke
15 June 2017
KVH is helping mobilise support for experts determining the extent of the myrtle rust incursion in Te Puke. A Te Puke woman contacted the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to report myrtle...
Myrtle rust in Te Puke
15 June 2017

KVH is helping mobilise support for experts determining the extent of the myrtle rust incursion in Te Puke.

A Te Puke woman contacted the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to report myrtle rust-like symptoms on a ramarama tree on her property.

KiwiNet received a request from AsureQuality and MPI to provide resources to assist with the response in the Te Puke area. We were happy to oblige, had a good response from our networks and were pleased to have been able to provide the resources required.

Myrtle rust is a fungal infection that can travel long distances in the wind and attacks plants of the Myrtaceae family. It doesn’t affect kiwifruit but could affect iconic New Zealand plants like pōhutukawa, kānuka, mānuka and rātā, as well as commercially-grown species such as eucalyptus, guava and feijoa.

Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit vines, growers will want to check any Myrtaceae plants on their property.

Look for:
• bright yellow powdery eruptions appearing on the underside of the leaf (young infection)
• bright yellow powdery eruptions on both sides of the leaf (mature infection)
• brown/grey rust pustules (older spores) which can appear on older lesions
• buckled or twisted leaves which may die off.

If you see any of these symptoms, call MPI immediately on 0800 80 99 66. Take a photo but don’t touch or take samples as this might increase spread of the disease.

This discovery should not impact movement of kiwifruit plants from nurseries unless they are growing or selling myrtle rust host material (Myrtaceae species).  Those nurseries need to follow the myrtle rust protocols for nurseries on the New Zealand Plant Producers Inc (NZPPI) website.

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Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz