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Grower News
18 May 2017
Myrtle rust disease and kiwifruit
18 May 2017
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has confirmed the presence of the myrtle rust plant disease on mainland New Zealand for the first time, in Kerikeri and Taranaki. Both finds were reported...
Myrtle rust disease and kiwifruit
18 May 2017

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has confirmed the presence of the myrtle rust plant disease on mainland New Zealand for the first time, in Kerikeri and Taranaki.

Both finds were reported to MPI by nurseries who we congratulate for being aware of what to look for and calling immediately something unusual was spotted.

This is an example of how important it is to be on the lookout – the sooner unwanted pests and diseases that make their way here are found, the more can be done to manage spread and take appropriate action.

Myrtle rust is a fungal infection that can travel long distances in the wind and attacks plants of the myrtaceae family. It doesn’t affect kiwifruit but could affect iconic New Zealand plants like pohutukawa, kanuka, manuka and rata, as well as commercially-grown species such as eucalyptus, guava and feijoa.

Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit vines this is an important and timely reminder for all growers to look out for symptoms on orchard myrtaceae trees. Look for:

• bright yellow powdery eruptions appearing on the underside of the leaf (young infection)
• bright yellow powdery eruptions on both sides of the leaf (mature infection)
• brown/grey rust pustules (older spores) can appear on older lesions
• leaves may become buckled or twisted and die off.

If you see any of these symptoms call MPI immediately on 0800 80 99 66. Take a photo but don’t touch or take samples as this might increase spread of the disease.

A myrtle rust fact sheet is available on the MPI website and there is also a lot of guidance available on the New Zealand Plant Producers site. 

Grower News
15 May 2017
Importance of good hygiene practices highlighted by myrtle rust discovery
15 May 2017
On Friday afternoon the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and New Zealand Plant Producers Incorporated (NZPPI) announced that a legal notice has been issued which makes it mandatory for...
Importance of good hygiene practices highlighted by myrtle rust discovery
15 May 2017

On Friday afternoon the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and New Zealand Plant Producers Incorporated (NZPPI) announced that a legal notice has been issued which makes it mandatory for nurseries, retailers, and plant transporters to comply with NZPPI Myrtle Rust Risk Management Protocols.

In short, the notice requires that hygiene, containment and management protocols are followed to increase the chances of early detection and lower the possibility of any further spread of myrtle rust.

Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit vines this is an important and timely reminder for all growers that good hygiene practices should always be followed to help manage biosecurity threats.

Unwanted pests and diseases are easily spread through infected plant material and unclean machinery, tools, people and vehicles. Good hygiene practices are essential to help prevent their spread between vines, orchards and regions.

KVH hygiene recommendations are available in detail online. They key points are: 

·         Check and clean tools, vehicles, machinery, people and clothing.

·         Ensure everything that comes on to your property is free from soil  and plant material.

·         Sanitise highest risk items and wash down dirty areas.

·         Share information about biosecurity measures with your staff and contractors.

Myrtle rust could affect any native or exotic myrtle plants on your property – like feijoa or guava plants for example. Before harvest check these plants for any symptoms of the disease. You can read more about myrtle rust on the KVH website or visit the NZPPI website to view a complete list of all native and exotic myrtle plants in New Zealand.

If you see any of symptoms of myrtle rust or anything else unusual, call the MPI exotic pests and diseases hotline on 0800 80 99 66. Take a photo but don't attempt to touch or collect samples of myrtle rust as this may increase spread of the disease.

Grower News
4 May 2017
Rules for importing kiwifruit seed
4 May 2017
Thanks to information provided by a local grower, KVH was recently alerted to an international website offering a range of kiwifruit seed varieties for sale. This is concerning because buying seeds...
Rules for importing kiwifruit seed
4 May 2017
Thanks to information provided by a local grower, KVH was recently alerted to an international website offering a range of kiwifruit seed varieties for sale. This is concerning because buying seeds online for import into New Zealand could risk introducing a plant disease.
 
KVH has worked with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to confirm the rules around importing kiwifruit seed and ensure MPI enforcement staff are aware of the site. 
 
There are strict rules around importing any kiwifruit seed. Seed intended for growing requires a permit to import and phytosanitary certificate. It must be imported into post entry quarantine where it will be grown and checked for a range of viruses and other plant disease organisms.  No seeds will be given biosecurity clearance; only plants which have been inspected and tested will be eligible for clearance.
 
MPI enforce all requirements and investigate any report of kiwifruit plants grown from unapproved seed imports. 
 
Please alert MPI if you are aware of any unapproved kiwifruit seed imports by calling the MPI exotic pest and disease hotline on 0800 80 99 66. 
Grower News
4 May 2017
Border information straight to your inbox
4 May 2017
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) regularly releases an update about what the Ministry and partners like KVH are doing together to keep New Zealand’s borders secure from pests and...
Border information straight to your inbox
4 May 2017
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) regularly releases an update about what the Ministry and partners like KVH are doing together to keep New Zealand’s borders secure from pests and diseases.
 
You can subscribe to ‘The Border Space’ newsletter here to receive future issues. Regular features include updates on surveillance and detection of unwanted pests, information about new biosecurity rules, initiatives being developed and trialled, and border activity statistics.
 
The latest issue also includes a profile on KVH and port company-led activities at the Port of Tauranga to create a model of biosecurity operational excellence. We’re doing a lot of work in this area with the wider Port community (transport and logistics personnel and transitional facility staff for example), alongside our colleagues at the Port and MPI, to raise awareness and understanding of biosecurity risk at the frontline.
 
Grower News
4 May 2017
Do not pick fruit after spraying with Actigard
4 May 2017
Fruit left in the canopy after harvest should not be picked for home use or sale if a post-harvest Actigard spray has been applied.    Syngenta advises that after spraying, fruit residues...
Do not pick fruit after spraying with Actigard
4 May 2017
Fruit left in the canopy after harvest should not be picked for home use or sale if a post-harvest Actigard spray has been applied. 
 
Syngenta advises that after spraying, fruit residues will exceed the local Maximum Residue Level (MRL) for Acibenzolar-S-Methyl (set at 0.02ppm). All domestically-produced food and food imports sold in New Zealand must comply with these Food Safety rules.  While the residue from the spray is unlikely to have any serious health impacts but it is important that product registration guidelines are always met.
 
A viable alternative is to get in quick before the sprayer or source reject fruit from post-harvest suppliers.
Grower News
4 May 2017
Keeping imported kiwifruit pest free
4 May 2017
Readers of the KVH Bulletin may recall that over the past few years, KVH has been advocating for tighter controls on the import of Italian kiwifruit to reduce the risk of White Peach Scale (WPS)...
Keeping imported kiwifruit pest free
4 May 2017
Readers of the KVH Bulletin may recall that over the past few years, KVH has been advocating for tighter controls on the import of Italian kiwifruit to reduce the risk of White Peach Scale (WPS) entering our borders. We have also been working with kiwifruit importers to ensure they are aware of this threat and measures they can take post-border to reduce risk.
 
While these discussions have not resulted in changes to the Import Health Standard, we are pleased to report that interceptions of WPS have declined significantly over the past season despite a similar level of infestation reported offshore. This is a great result and reflects measures that both the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and importers have taken in dealing with Italian counterparts to ensure fruit arriving in New Zealand is free of unwanted organisms. 
 
This season there were almost 900,000 kilos of kiwifruit was imported in 31 consignments, which were all inspected by MPI at the border. Only two of these consignments were found to have WPS, and were fumigated to remove biosecurity risk. This compares to 18 out of 46 consignments – or 39% - last year. 
 
KVH and Zespri are also funding research being conducted in Italy to better understand cold tolerance of WPS and the ability of these organisms to reproduce following long periods of cold storage. This research is ongoing and the outcomes will support further actions to reduce risk. 
 
WPS is regularly intercepted by MPI at our borders. This pest has caused considerable damage to Italian kiwifruit orchards with production losses of up to 20% in some years. WPS infects bark, fruit and leaves of plants. In severe cases it appears as white, cottony masses encrusting the bark of the tree. Trees which are heavily infested can become stunted and young plants can die very quickly after infestation. Read the KVH factsheet to learn more about identifying and controlling WPS.
 
Grower News
4 May 2017
Learning more about Psa across the world
4 May 2017
Early last week KVH and NZKGI hosted a group of growers from Spain and Portugal to learn more about the challenges and experiences of growing kiwifruit in other regions.   KVH presented to the...
Learning more about Psa across the world
4 May 2017
Early last week KVH and NZKGI hosted a group of growers from Spain and Portugal to learn more about the challenges and experiences of growing kiwifruit in other regions.
 
KVH presented to the group on Monday and shared information about Psa in New Zealand, including our history with the disease and control efforts that are now in place. Most of the group are Hayward growers and were thankful for the interesting information shared with them that they can apply in their own local areas.
 
The growers shared with KVH that in several orchards in the coldest areas of Galicia (in the north west of Spain and the main production area of the country) and northern Portugal, where during January temperatures were as low as -7 degrees, large symptoms on trunks and leaders were recorded before budburst in February and early March. 
 
Unlike previous years, symptoms appeared more frequently in female plants. 
 
In the more temperate zones however there were practically no symptoms. 
 
There was a good number of cooler hours last winter, especially in December and January, with extreme temperatures and low rainfall.  Shoot dieback and cane collapse have been detected in some plants.
 
Both regions are currently in pre-flowering (flowering in Hayward will occur in about a fortnight from now) and they are seeing spots on leaves and early signs of sepal staining on buds. The weather has been dry over spring and as a result symptoms have not yet been serious. Rainfall was expected late last week, which is likely to lead to an increase in symptoms.
 
KVH will remain in contact with the group to ensure we keep up-to-date with seasonal changes to Psa. 
 
Grower News
4 May 2017
Nursery joins KPCS
4 May 2017
KVH is pleased to announce another nursery has joined the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme this week (KPCS).   Te Mahuri Nursery in Te Puke has met the requirements to sell KPCS...
Nursery joins KPCS
4 May 2017
KVH is pleased to announce another nursery has joined the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme this week (KPCS).
 
Te Mahuri Nursery in Te Puke has met the requirements to sell KPCS “within region” certified plants to growers in the Te Puke region.
 
Growers are reminded that KVH movement controls must be observed when ordering kiwifruit plants form nurseries.
 
For a list of nurseries and their KPCS status, and to find out more about requirements of the KPCS, click here.
 
Grower News
20 April 2017
Bad weather in Italy leads to increase in Psa symptoms
20 April 2017
In the last Bulletin we talked about the need to increase Psa protective sprays in line with the seasonal weather changes. This has become even more pertinent following the bad, wet and windy...
Bad weather in Italy leads to increase in Psa symptoms
20 April 2017

In the last Bulletin we talked about the need to increase Psa protective sprays in line with the seasonal weather changes.

This has become even more pertinent following the bad, wet and windy weather we’ve recently had and news out of Northern Italy that Psa infection in Italy this spring is higher than previous years.

After a very wet autumn, the Italians have had a relatively mild winter and dry spring. It’s thought that the extensive rain last autumn has led to the outbreak they’re seeing now which is affecting Hayward in particular. Verona, Piedmont and Emilia Romagna are also heavily infected with significant secondary symptoms. 

There’s a strong chance we could see the same symptoms here in New Zealand next spring if growers don’t take the right action now.  To help protect their orchards, growers need to:

• apply a copper spray following the recent wet windy weather (ensure a suitable time window before harvest) to protect new wounds and rebuild protective cover across vines as soon as possible,
• ensure a copper Actigard spray is applied immediately after harvest to help prevent Psa entering vines through harvest wounds and leaf scars,
• look at a winter copper programme of five full rate copper sprays between harvest and bud break. Consider both weather and orchard activities when planning these sprays.

Post-harvest, Actigard can be tank mixed with copper and is most effective when applied to leaves that are still in good condition. It should not be applied to vines that have been waterlogged for an extended period. Vines should be given four to five days to recover from the recent heavy downpours before application.

For more information, refer to KVH's Psa-V Best Practice Guide.

Any growers concerned they may not be achieving the expected levels of Psa control from copper applications at label rates should contact KVH on 0800 665 825 or email info@kvh.org.nz.

Grower News
20 April 2017
Copper resistance workshop
20 April 2017
KVH continues to work with the science community and agrichemical company experts to better understand copper resistance in Psa. A science workshop was held last week where presentations on the...
Copper resistance workshop
20 April 2017

KVH continues to work with the science community and agrichemical company experts to better understand copper resistance in Psa.

A science workshop was held last week where presentations on the latest research from Otago University, Plant and Food and Massey University were discussed.

Genome sequencing of Psa samples collected from a range of regions carried out by Otago University has identified two different genome altering mechanisms (Plasmids and ICE) capable of conferring copper resistance into Psa bacteria. These Plasmids and ICE mechanisms are present in other bacteria readily found in the orchard environment and can transfer from these other bacteria to Psa.

We are still working with the scientist to better understand what these latest finding mean when it comes to Psa control on orchards with copper over the longer term, but importantly there is no evidence that the application of copper is resulting in this situation.

Another workshop is scheduled to take place in May to ensure in light of this information we are recommending the best control programmes to recommend to growers.

As a result of these latest findings KVH will be reviewing movement control Protocols for orchards that are known to have these forms of Psa. However other forms of Psa that are deemed a risk to the industry (i.e. mutations conferring Streptomycin resistance, other forms of Cu resistance and non-New Zealand forms of Psa) will continue to be restricted under existing protocols for both orchards and nurseries.

Grower News
20 April 2017
Remember to have your say on pest management
20 April 2017
KVH and NZKGI are making joint submissions to The Bay of Plenty Regional Council and Northland Regional Council on the pest management plans each council is reviewing. A reminder that individual...
Remember to have your say on pest management
20 April 2017

KVH and NZKGI are making joint submissions to The Bay of Plenty Regional Council and Northland Regional Council on the pest management plans each council is reviewing.

A reminder that individual submissions to both are welcomed so do take the opportunity to have your say on any areas of interest. The plans cover management of a range of pests including wild kiwifruit and moth plant.

We will also publish our submissions on the KVH website for you to view.

Grower News
20 April 2017
Website easier to use
20 April 2017
We’ve made a change to our website to make it easier and quicker for growers to find useful information. There is now a section under the ‘Growers’ tab called ‘Grower...
Website easier to use
20 April 2017

We’ve made a change to our website to make it easier and quicker for growers to find useful information.

There is now a section under the ‘Growers’ tab called ‘Grower resources’ where we list links to all the most topical documents, videos, and news items on our site that growers might need at any given time.

You can now simply to go to this resources page instead of having to search across different pages and sections to find things (the easy shortcut to get there is www.kvh.org.nz/resources).

We’ll regularly update the page so that the items on it are always the ones you most want and need.

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Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz