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Media Releases
2 August 2018
Third Flagship Site for BioHeritage
2 August 2018
New Zealand's Biological Heritage has joined the award-winning Port of Tauranga biosecurity partnership that is committed to biosecurity excellence. It is the third Flagship Site for the BioHeritage...
Third Flagship Site for BioHeritage
2 August 2018

New Zealand's Biological Heritage has joined the award-winning Port of Tauranga biosecurity partnership that is committed to biosecurity excellence.

It is the third Flagship Site for the BioHeritage Challenge, with this collaboration being aligned with our goal of eliminating threats posed by pests, weeds, and pathogens.

Flagship Site partnerships provide a pathway to the Challenge’s goal of achieving a fundamental shift in the way science and research is carried out in New Zealand, BioHeritage Director Dr Andrea Byrom says.

“In particular, we believe that transformational change can only be achieved through partnerships with industry, the private sector, Māori and the community.”

The Challenge’s involvement supports research on surveillance and detection of pests at the border being done by the Better Border Biosecurity (B3) science consortium. It bolsters the Port of Tauranga’s commitment to use science to support innovation and grow biosecurity excellence. B3’s goals are strongly aligned with the BioHeritage Challenge, with them sharing a vision to deliver transformational biosecurity solutions for New Zealand.

The Port of Tauranga biosecurity partnership was formed in 2014 between the port, several primary industries, and central and local government agencies. All groups work together to prevent and respond to biosecurity risks through the Port of Tauranga.

Port of Tauranga Chief Executive Mark Cairns said the partnership strengthens the significance of biosecurity within the port and local community.

“New Zealand ports are an essential part of the New Zealand economy and a key component of our border biosecurity system. Effective biosecurity awareness and the use of the very best tools and technologies is critical to us continuing to run a successful business that services the Bay of Plenty region.”

Stu Hutchings, Chief Executive of industry partner Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH), says the partnership recognises that everyone who works in and around the port community, including the freight sector and transitional facilities, can all play a big part in keeping unwanted pests and pathogens out of New Zealand.

The other two Flagship Sites supported by BioHeritage are Cape to City in the Hawke’s Bay and Taranaki Mounga.

“Being involved with Flagship Sites provides opportunities to broaden and deepen the range of activities being undertaken, and helps us connect with the public,” Andrea says.

“Our involvement also recognises the strategic role that science and research must play in shaping New Zealand’s future.”

Media Releases
29 June 2018
Kiwifruit Claim outcome
29 June 2018
The High Court has announced a ruling today in the Kiwifruit Claim case. Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) is focused on the future and working in partnership with government and other groups to...
Kiwifruit Claim outcome
29 June 2018

The High Court has announced a ruling today in the Kiwifruit Claim case.

Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) is focused on the future and working in partnership with government and other groups to improve the biosecurity of the industry.

KVH Chief Executive Stu Hutchings says the organisation does not have a position on the Claim but is supportive of the rights of growers and their entitlement to have taken this legal action.

“The judge has made a ruling and it is now up to the parties involved to determine what their next steps might be.”

“KVH works with everyone involved in the kiwifruit industry. Our priority will be to continue to work collaboratively with the 2,500 kiwifruit growers across the regions to keep unwanted pests and diseases out of our orchards.”

Media contact:
Lisa Gibbison
Communications Advisor
0800 665 825
02202 54724

Media Releases
30 April 2018
Response to article about wild kiwifruit vines
30 April 2018
KVH has provided the below response to the Marlborough Express in regards to an article on wild kiwifruit vines. Dear Editor, Over the weekend Stuff.co.nz and the Sunday Star Times published an...
Response to article about wild kiwifruit vines
30 April 2018

KVH has provided the below response to the Marlborough Express in regards to an article on wild kiwifruit vines.

Dear Editor,

Over the weekend Stuff.co.nz and the Sunday Star Times published an article from one of your reporters on wild kiwifruit vines.

The article included valuable information about the topic that is important for the public to be aware of, however from our perspective there was an unnecessarily alarmist tone to the article overall. KVH, several regional councils and unitary authorities all work together on initiatives to manage wild kiwifruit vines and have done so, very successfully, for many years as part of our usual business.

There were some inaccuracies that need correcting:

·        KVH said that it’s not very often an industry comes along and asks that the plant on which that industry is based is named as a pest. We did not ask that the produce/kiwifruit be named as a pest.

·        Contractors destroyed 14,600 wild vines in 2017 and not since 2010.

·        Wild kiwifruit vines have historically established from dumped fruit and the discovery of fruit stickers has proved this.  Dumped fruit is not “scraps” and we said wild vines can also establish from unconsumed fruit left in a compost heap.

KVH is always happy to review facts used by your reporters in the interest of ensuring correct information about what is a complex and technical programme of work, can be provided to readers.

Lastly, we would also like to clarify that KVH is not a lobby group. We are the kiwifruit industry’s biosecurity organisation, funded by growers, and we work collaboratively with all parties across the industry as well as government.

Kind regards,

Stu Hutchings
Chief Executive
KVH

Media Releases
11 April 2018
Tiny wasp to combat stink bug
11 April 2018
Horticultural industry groups along with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) are working together to use a tiny parasitoid wasp to combat the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). The...
Tiny wasp to combat stink bug
11 April 2018

Horticultural industry groups along with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) are working together to use a tiny parasitoid wasp to combat the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

The BMSB Council (a partnership between horticultural industry groups and MPI, under GIA) has made an application to the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) seeking approval to release the Samurai Wasp (Trissolcus japonicus) as a biocontrol agent against BMSB, but only if an incursion is found in New Zealand.

BMSB Council Chair Alan Pollard says if a BMSB incursion is found here, the consequences would be disastrous for New Zealand's horticulture industries and everyday New Zealanders.  

“The stink bug is one of the biggest biosecurity threats we face, and it could cause hundreds of millions of dollars of losses. The wasp provides an opportunity to be proactive in our approach and gives us another tool we can use to control the stink bug,” said Mr Pollard.

“It feeds on over 300 plant species and can multiply and get to very high population numbers rapidly, destroying crops and gardens and even get into your home. In the USA and Europe where the invasive pest has become established, it has caused severe damage to the horticulture industries. It’s also invaded residents’ homes and become a real social nuisance.”

“We’ve also seen growers overseas use high levels of insecticides as the primary way to control the stink bug. We believe the wasp will provide a targeted and self-sustaining control tool and provides growers with another option other than increasing insecticide sprays,” says Mr Pollard.

The wasp does not sting and is harmless to humans but is a natural enemy of the stink bug. The female wasp lays her eggs inside the stink bugs eggs, killing the stink bug in the process. Studies overseas have shown the wasp can destroy over 70 percent of the eggs in a stink bug egg mass.

A NZIER report, commissioned by the Samurai Wasp Steering Group, has estimated that gross domestic product would fall by between $1.8 billion and $3.6b by 2038 if BMSB became established. It also estimated the horticulture export value could fall by between $2b and $4.2b.

Public submissions are now open until 5pm, Thursday, 24 May 2018. Interested parties are encouraged to make a submission on the EPA website.


For more information contact:

Alan Pollard
GIA BMSB Council Chair
Ph: 021 576 109
Email: alan@applesandpears.nz

About the BMSB Council

The BMSB Council is a partnership under GIA between industry and government and is the responsible for BMSB readiness and response. The Council consists of member organisations (Kiwifruit Vine Health, Ministry for Primary Industries, New Zealand Avocado, New Zealand Apples & Pears, New Zealand Winegrowers, Tomatoes New Zealand, Vegetables New Zealand) and observers (Foundation for Arable Research, Horticulture New Zealand, New Zealand Plant Producers Inc., Process Vegetables New Zealand and Summerfruit New Zealand).


About the Government Industry Agreement (GIA)

GIA operates as a partnership between industry groups and Government to manage pests and diseases that could badly damage New Zealand's primary industries, our economy, and our environment. It aims to improve biosecurity outcomes and give everyone the confidence that the best decisions are being made to manage and mitigate biosecurity risks. For more information, visit www.gia.org.nz.

 

Media Releases
27 February 2018
BMSB impact on horticulture devastating, report says
27 February 2018
An economic report, released today, says if the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) establishes in New Zealand it would dramatically impact New Zealand’s gross domestic product (GDP) as well as...
BMSB impact on horticulture devastating, report says
27 February 2018

An economic report, released today, says if the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) establishes in New Zealand it would dramatically impact New Zealand’s gross domestic product (GDP) as well as export revenues from horticulture.

Prepared by the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research (NZIER), Quantifying the economic impacts of a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug incursion in New Zealand, shows GDP falling between $1.8 billion and $3.6 billion by 2038, and horticulture export value falling between $2 billion and $4.2 billion by 2038.

“A BMSB incursion would affect multiple sectors simultaneously,” Horticulture New Zealand chief executive Mike Chapman says. “This is currently the number one pest threatening horticulture and we are fully supportive of action at the border to keep it out, including the recent moves to prevent ships contaminated with brown marmorated stink bugs from unloading their cargoes in Auckland.”

An incursion would reduce crop yields, increase costs, and lower the export value for exports. At the same time, it would impact on employment, wages, and result in a poorer standard of living, the report says.

NZ Winegrowers Biosecurity and Emergency Response Manager Dr Edwin Massey says the report confirms that brown marmorated stink bug is one of the wine industry’s highest threat biosecurity risks.

“Working through the Government Industry Agreement, we are committed to working with the Crown and other industry groups to mitigate this risk as much as possible.”

The report was commissioned by the Samurai Wasp Steering group and funded by Horticulture New Zealand, New Zealand Winegrowers, Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH), Vegetable Research and Innovation (VR&I), Ministry for Primary Industries, Foundation for Arable Research (FAR), New Zealand Apples & Pears, Summerfruit NZ, and New Zealand Avocado.

The steering group is looking at introduction of a biocontrol, the samurai wasp, to combat BMSB if it establishes in New Zealand. You can find out more about that here.

You can find out more about BMSB and what to do if you find any on the KVH website here.

Media Releases
12 February 2018
Keep sending shiploads of BMSB packing
12 February 2018
Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, says the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) should be congratulated for taking the right action in turning back ships that have...
Keep sending shiploads of BMSB packing
12 February 2018

Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, says the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) should be congratulated for taking the right action in turning back ships that have arrived at our ports carrying hundreds of unwanted pests.

“Over the last few days MPI has turned around two large cargo vessels because one of the most damaging pests to the kiwifruit and wider horticultural industries - the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) – was found hitchhiking on both ships and in used vehicles onboard.”

The BMSB is a pest that could destroy New Zealand’s fruit and vegetable industries. It also infests homes, ruins gardens, and stinks when crushed says Barry.

“It’s not in New Zealand yet and we want to keep it that way – we must do everything we can to keep it out.”

“That is why KVH is pleased with the ongoing diligence of MPI to detect these stink bugs at the border and we fully support the serious steps they have been taking to manage the risk of it getting here, including these recent cases of requiring treatment to take place offshore before allowing high-risk ships and cargo to enter and unload goods at our Ports.”

“The decisions may not always be popular with those importing goods, but the rules are very clear, and they are stringent for a reason. Unwanted pests like the BMSB could cause hundreds of millions of dollars damage to the New Zealand economy and heavily affect growers’ livelihoods if it were to establish here.”

Working alongside MPI, industry groups including KVH have been working hard to raise awareness of the threat and impact of BMSB crossing our borders. This work has included meetings with importers and transporters of machinery and other high-risk goods to ensure they are fully aware of the biosecurity measures they must take. KVH has also been working with kiwifruit growers, Zespri, MPI and the wider kiwifruit industry to ensure preparedness for BMSB, if it were to arrive and establish here. This includes running awareness programmes and simulation exercises.

More information about BMSB, including video showing the destructive impacts it has had on kiwifruit orchards in Italy and the way it is affecting lifestyles in the USA, can be viewed on the KVH website.

Media Releases
18 December 2017
New Chief Executive for kiwifruit organisation
18 December 2017
Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) announced today that Stu Hutchings has been appointed as the biosecurity organisation’s new Chief Executive. KVH Board Chairman, Adrian Gault, says Stu joins the...
New Chief Executive for kiwifruit organisation
18 December 2017

Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) announced today that Stu Hutchings has been appointed as the biosecurity organisation’s new Chief Executive.

KVH Board Chairman, Adrian Gault, says Stu joins the team well qualified with a wealth of experience and knowledge in management of biosecurity risks; research and innovation; and working on a day-to-day basis with farmers, alongside industry and government partners.

“In his most recent management role at OSPRI, Stu has been responsible for establishing the framework for delivery of a new long-term pest and disease management plan and several innovative research projects, and has managed relationships with the Ministry for Primary Industries and other primary industry groups.”

“Stu is perfectly placed to take the helm and continue the great work the KVH team has been doing to stop unwanted pests and diseases from making their way into our communities and onto our orchards, and being well prepared in case they do get here.”

“We’re very excited to have Stu join KVH and believe he’ll be a great asset to the kiwifruit industry.”

Stu says he is looking forward to joining what he sees as a committed and future-thinking organisation.

“The work the KVH team has been undertaking over the last few years has driven biosecurity solutions and lifted awareness across the kiwifruit industry, and within New Zealand.”

“There are a lot of innovative approaches to biosecurity challenges being led by KVH, with great support and backing from kiwifruit growers who care about the success of the industry and want to be involved. I find that incredibly exciting.”

Stu is currently the Group Manager, Programme Design and Partnerships for OSPRI and has had previous roles as acting Chief Executive for both the Animal Health Board and OSPRI. A veterinarian by trade, he has also held roles within private vet practice and risk management product development for the New Zealand Veterinary Association. 

He replaces current Chief Executive Barry O’Neil, who announced in August 2017 that he would be stepping down from the role after a six-year term in March 2018.

Media Releases
31 October 2017
Biosecurity Week 2017 kicks off
31 October 2017
Pests and diseases from offshore can cause serious harm to New Zealand's unique environment and primary industries; and the Port of Tauranga is one of many potential gateways. Biosecurity Week...
Biosecurity Week 2017 kicks off
31 October 2017

Pests and diseases from offshore can cause serious harm to New Zealand's unique environment and primary industries; and the Port of Tauranga is one of many potential gateways.

Biosecurity Week activities highlight the importance of biosecurity and the role that everyone in the Bay of Plenty can play in managing unwanted biosecurity risks says Kiwifruit Vine Health Chief Executive Barry O’Neil.

“We’re looking forward to talking to people who work on and around the Port about biosecurity – it’s such an important issue and one that really does affect everyone.”

“People who own and work at local businesses remember what Psa has done to the kiwifruit industry. There are bugs and pests that we don’t want here in New Zealand because of the devastating effect they will have not only on kiwifruit, but on the whole of our horticulture industry and environment.”

“A good example is a particular type of bug we’re concerned about – it’s one of our most unwanted and called the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug. It’s a major nuisance that attacks fruit when it feeds and ruins it. It infests homes and in the USA we’ve seen it stop people from being able to sit outside their homes and have a simple BBQ”.

Port staff, transitional facilities, associated industries (such as transporters and other logistical operators), and biosecurity experts will be meeting at several events over the next six days to raise awareness and understanding of the importance of managing biosecurity risk.

Special guest Ruud 'The Bug Man' Kleinpaste will also be attending several industry and community school group presentations during the week to discuss the vital role of everyone who works and lives in and around the Port and local community in keeping unwanted pests and diseases out of New Zealand.

Throughout the week there will also be discussions with post-harvest facilities and transitional facilities to learn more about the frontline biosecurity systems they have in place.

Biosecurity Week is part of the biosecurity excellence partnership between Port of Tauranga, the Ministry for Primary Industries, Kiwifruit Vine Health, NZ Avocado, Dairy NZ, Forestry Owners Association, NZ Customs and Bay of Plenty Regional Council. 

The award-winning partnership aims to build a port community committed to biosecurity excellence, with an ambitious goal of no biosecurity incursions coming through the Port of Tauranga. It is a successful regional example of the Ministry for Primary Industries, local industries and regional government, partnering to build a biosecurity team of 4.7 million New Zealanders.  

It also benefits from strong engagement with the science community, including a formal partnership with the New Zealand’s Biological Heritage national science challenge and the B3 (Better Border Biosecurity) science collaboration. This has been boosted by a $1.95 million co-funded research project with B3 to trial new tools and technologies in the port environment, monitor biosecurity awareness amongst the local community, and measure the impacts of changes on biosecurity risk.

Port of Tauranga Chief Executive Mark Cairns said the week provides a good opportunity to strengthen the significance of biosecurity within the Port community.

“Effective biosecurity awareness is critical to us running a successful business and being able to continue to service the Bay of Plenty region. The various events we’re holding for our staff, contractors and local businesses who regularly interact with us and our facilities will give us the chance to show people what they should be looking out for and what to do if they find anything.”

“It’s an opportunity to demonstrate the good work that happens here at the Port, day in day out, to keep an eye out.”

“Our people are at the frontline – they’re the ones most likely to first notice an unwanted pest on cargo, vehicles or equipment moving off the port. By knowing what to look for and reporting unfamiliar insects or suspicious looking pests they help protect everyone’s livelihood and the future of the kiwifruit, avocado and forestry sectors.”

View the PDF of this press release as it was sent to media.

Media Releases
13 July 2017
Stink bug agreement signed
13 July 2017
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one of the biggest threats facing New Zealand’s horticultural sector. It threatens the livelihoods of primary sector producers, and would impact on the...
Stink bug agreement signed
13 July 2017

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one of the biggest threats facing New Zealand’s horticultural sector. It threatens the livelihoods of primary sector producers, and would impact on the quality of life of all New Zealanders if ever able to establish here.

An agreement to reduce the damaging impact of BMSB incursion was signed today by a number of horticultural sector groups and Government at the Horticulture NZ Conference in Tauranga.

BMSB Council Chairperson, Alan Pollard, says this means primary industry organisations and the Ministry for Primary Industries can work together to prepare for and reduce the impacts of the pest.

“While BMSB populations have never taken hold in New Zealand, it’s a sneaky pest that spreads fast and has been caught at the border on passengers and in imported goods many times,” says Mr Pollard.

“If given the opportunity, BMSB has the potential to cause billions of damage to the New Zealand economy. They attack a wide range of New Zealand crops such as grapes, kiwifruit, apples, and stone fruit, corn and many other valuable crops” said Mr Pollard. “In addition, BMSB can ruin peoples’ gardens and when it gets cold, BMSB tends to bunch up in large numbers in dark spaces in homes and other dwellings, making it a huge public nuisance.”

The agreement, under the Government Industry Agreement for Biosecurity readiness and response (GIA) sets out operational requirements for readiness and response activities and cost-sharing arrangements between Government and affected industries in the management of the BMSB threat. It enables joint decision-making between the parties and sees them all working together to reduce the impacts of the pest to the affected industries.

 

“By working together under GIA, Government and affected industries can achieve far greater outcomes for the benefit of all New Zealanders” says Mr Pollard. “This operational agreement enables us to harness the capabilities of both Government and industry groups to fight BMSB head on. It also gives industry groups a seat at the decision-making table and ensures that an industry perspective is included when decisions are made.”

Initial signatories to the operational agreement are Pipfruit NZ, Kiwifruit Vine Health Ltd, New Zealand Avocado Growers Association, Tomatoes New Zealand, Vegetables New Zealand, NZ Winegrowers, and the Ministry for Primary Industries. It is expected that other industry groups impacted by BMSB will sign the operational agreement in the future once they have joined the GIA partnership.

Media Releases
13 March 2017
Kiwifruit industry signs agreement to fight pest threats
13 March 2017
Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Inc has signed an agreement with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to help reduce the damaging impacts of the four most common biosecurity threats to the kiwifruit...
Kiwifruit industry signs agreement to fight pest threats
13 March 2017
Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Inc has signed an agreement with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to help reduce the damaging impacts of the four most common biosecurity threats to the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors.

The operational agreement under the Government Industry Agreement for Biosecurity Readiness and Response (GIA) was finalised today in Wellington. It sets out the contractual arrangements of how industry and Government will work together to manage potential pests.
 
"This means the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors and MPI can work together to manage and help reduce the impact of a number of pest threats on our sector, which has exports of almost $2 billion per year," said KVH CEO, Barry O’Neil.  
 
"There are a number of biosecurity threats facing our industry. The Psa incursion which impacted us from 2010 cost the kiwifruit industry $1 billion. With the signing of this agreement we have committed to doing everything we can to stop another Psa-type event from occurring.”
 
The agreement establishes the operational details for readiness and response activities and cost-sharing arrangements, to deliver better biosecurity outcomes for the kiwifruit sector. It includes the roles and responsibilities of all the parties, including how joint activities will be cost shared. The GIA partnership currently has 14 partners from across Government and the wider primary sector, who have agreed to work together to jointly manage biosecurity threats.
 
“The GIA partnership welcomes the signing of this agreement as a positive step forward for both Government and the kiwifruit sector,” said GIA Secretariat Manager, Steve Rich.
 
“This agreement provides a prime example of how biosecurity will come to be managed in New Zealand under GIA – with industry and the Crown working together to achieve the best possible outcomes.”
 
The agreement covers the four most common threats to the kiwifruit sector, and other pests and pathogens can be added to the agreement as they are identified. Signatories to the agreement include Kiwifruit Vine Health Inc (on behalf of the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors) and the Ministry for Primary Industries on behalf of the Crown).
 
The kiwifruit and kiwiberry sector operational agreement is the second of its kind. The first agreement was the multi-sector agreement for the management of fruit fly in New Zealand and agreements for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) are currently in development. Over time, further operational agreements for specific biosecurity threats, and sectors represented under GIA, will be executed between the partners to GIA.
 
Media Releases
20 June 2016
Kiwiberry growers join GIA biosecurity partnership
20 June 2016
Primary Industries Minister, Hon Nathan Guy has approved the application for NZ KiwiBerry Growers Incorporated (NZKBG) to join the GIA partnership. NZKBG will be represented by Kiwifruit Vine Health...
Kiwiberry growers join GIA biosecurity partnership
20 June 2016

Primary Industries Minister, Hon Nathan Guy has approved the application for NZ KiwiBerry Growers Incorporated (NZKBG) to join the GIA partnership.

NZKBG will be represented by Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH), which became the first industry group to sign the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) Deed for Biosecurity Readiness and Response in May 2014.

NZKBG Chair, Geoff Oliver said joining the GIA partnership, will give the kiwiberry industry the opportunity to influence decision making in the event of a biosecurity response.

“This means we can all work together on managing and responding to the biosecurity risks that impact our industry,” says Mr Oliver.

“The kiwiberry sector is going through a significant growth phase, and production is projected to rise from 140,000 export trays in 2016 to 200,000 trays in 2016, so we must do all we can to understand and manage our biggest biosecurity risk and the impacts they could have on our industry.”

The kiwiberry sector comprises of around 40 producing, or soon to be producing, hectares – most of which is based in the Bay of Plenty region. Last year NZKBG generated $4.2m in revenue, of which 90 percent came from exports.

KVH’s Chief Executive Barry O’Neil says KVH is pleased to represent the kiwiberry industry at the decision making table. “We have a commonality of biosecurity issues. Kiwiberry are likely to be susceptible to many of the same pests and diseases as other kiwifruit cultivars, so working together in partnership makes sense”, says Mr O’Neil.

“We are currently working to determine what pests and diseases will be the biggest threats to kiwiberry and identify what readiness activities are required to mitigate the risk of these threats.”

GIA Secretariat Manager, Steve Rich welcomed NZKBG on behalf of the GIA partnership saying the new addition further strengthens efforts to better deliver biosecurity outcomes. “It’s great to see sectors facing similar risks and concerns joining forces for the purposes of delivering better biosecurity,” says Mr Rich.

“One of the key benefits of GIA for smaller primary sectors like KiwiBerry is the ability to partner directly with the other players in the system.”

NZKBG joins Kiwifruit Vine Health, Pipfruit New Zealand Inc., New Zealand Pork, New Zealand Equine Health Association, Onions New Zealand Inc., the NZ Forestry Owners Association, The New Zealand Avocado Growers’ Association, NZ Citrus Growers’ Inc. and the Ministry for Primary Industries under GIA.

About Government Industry Agreement (GIA)
GIA operates as a partnership between industry and government to manage pests and diseases that could badly damage New Zealand's primary industries, our economy, and our environment. It aims to improve biosecurity outcomes and give everyone the confidence that the best decisions are being made.

To find out more about NZ KiwiBerry Growers Inc. visit www.nzkiwiberry.com, or to find out more about GIA, visit www.gia.org.nz

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz