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Biosecurity News
9 February 2017
Post-harvest Biosecurity for Packhouses
9 February 2017
The post-harvest protocols have been updated for 2017 and are now available on the KVH website.  Postharvest Biosecurity Risk Management Plans must be signed off before harvest commences this...
Post-harvest Biosecurity for Packhouses
9 February 2017
The post-harvest protocols have been updated for 2017 and are now available on the KVH website.  Postharvest Biosecurity Risk Management Plans must be signed off before harvest commences this season. The plans must be submitted to KVH by Monday 27th February. Please email these to karyn.lowry@kvh.org.nz
 
All bins in all regions must be clear of plant material and sanitised pre-season and between orchards. For sanitiser options refer to KVH Information Sheet: Sanitisers.
 
There are additional requirements for postharvest operators moving bins between regions. Refer to KVH Protocol: Fruit Bins.
 
Biosecurity News
9 February 2017
White Peach Scale notification
9 February 2017
We’ve had an excellent response to our calls for vigilance when handling imported fruit.    On February 3, the KVH team received a call from an importer who suspected White Peach...
White Peach Scale notification
9 February 2017
We’ve had an excellent response to our calls for vigilance when handling imported fruit. 
 
On February 3, the KVH team received a call from an importer who suspected White Peach Scale on some Italian fruit. We worked with Plant and Food Research to verify that it was White Peach Scale – a pest which is currently not present in NZ - all scale were dead.   The pallet of fruit in question had been fumigated prior to Christmas. MPI fumigated fewer lines of Italian kiwifruit this year than last; a reflection on the lower incidence of White Peach Scale identified at the border this year. 
 
It is gratifying to see industry vigilance in identifying and reporting this pest and that the border controls in place are offering effective protection to the industry. If you need a reminder on how to handle sightings of what you suspect might be damaging pests on imported fruit, have a look at our biosecurity poster
 
Grower News
9 February 2017
Report suspicious symptoms
9 February 2017
If growers notice unusual symptoms - including those that are Psa-like but don’t return a positive Psa test – please contact KVH. Additional testing can be arranged.   Previous...
Report suspicious symptoms
9 February 2017
If growers notice unusual symptoms - including those that are Psa-like but don’t return a positive Psa test – please contact KVH. Additional testing can be arranged.
 
Previous investigations have identified a number of endophytic or environmental bacteria and fungal species that have likely entered vines through wounds. Samples are also screened for other Psa strains as well as cherry leaf roll virus. 
 
The Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) launched as a biosecurity standard for kiwifruit rootstock production also has targeted measures in place to identify organisms other than Psa. This helps reduce the likelihood of nursery plants spreading risk organisms through the industry. Information on symptoms and control measures are available in the KPCS document Target organisms and associated controls.
 
As our understanding of biosecurity risks to the kiwifruit industry evolves, there is provision within the scheme for other target organisms, beyond Psa-V, to be added. The KVH phone number is 
0800 665825.
Grower News
9 February 2017
Zespri Innovation Fellowship
9 February 2017
The Zespri Innovation Fellowships are offered to build awareness of the kiwifruit industry as an exciting career option, to encourage further research into kiwifruit and related fields, and to...
Zespri Innovation Fellowship
9 February 2017
The Zespri Innovation Fellowships are offered to build awareness of the kiwifruit industry as an exciting career option, to encourage further research into kiwifruit and related fields, and to encourage capability building. 
 
There are numerous exciting opportunities and careers in the kiwifruit industry. Science students with an interest in undertaking research in horticulture - particularly in the areas of biosecurity, new cultivars data management, health and nutrition, and manipulating fruit taste and quality - can find more information or apply here.
 
Grower News
9 February 2017
Support our talented young horticulturalists
9 February 2017
Come along to the Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition at the Te Puke A&P Show this weekend and show your support for young horticulturalists. The six contestants will battle it out in a...
Support our talented young horticulturalists
9 February 2017
Come along to the Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition at the Te Puke A&P Show this weekend and show your support for young horticulturalists. The six contestants will battle it out in a series of theoretical and practical horticultural activities during this fun and challenging full-day event. The competition starts at 9am and culminates with a speech contest at the gala dinner and awards ceremony on Wednesday 15 February at ASB Arena.  
Click here for more information.
 
Biosecurity News
9 February 2017
Queensland Fruit Fly Australian visit
9 February 2017
At the end of January, KVH chief executive Barry O’Neil visited Sydney Fruit Fly University Researchers. He travelled with MPI’s GIA Manager Steve Rich. They met formally with the...
Queensland Fruit Fly Australian visit
9 February 2017
At the end of January, KVH chief executive Barry O’Neil visited Sydney Fruit Fly University Researchers. He travelled with MPI’s GIA Manager Steve Rich. They met formally with the Australian National Fruit Fly Council to better understand the issues and approach Australians are taking in the control of Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF). Barry and Steve also wanted to identify areas for collaboration, including joint research efforts for combined interests in the battle against QFF.  
 
Barry says: “QFF is the No 1 risk on our industry’s unwanted biosecurity threat list. Last year we entered into a partnership with MPI and other horticulture sectors to ensure we are doing everything we can to continue to keep New Zealand QFF-free.  This agreement is not just about being fully ready to respond, but also looking at how we can improve our current approach”. 
 
He says it’s naturally not a scenario anyone wants to entertain, but if New Zealand ever ended up with a large breeding population of QFF the Australian experience would prove valuable. “We would need to consider use of sterile males as is happening in Australia, and is common practice around the world in countries were fruit fly present.”
 
Female fruit fly only mate once, so once large numbers of sterile males are released the population collapses. 
 
Meetings at Macquarie University ARC Centre for fruit fly research and the Elizabeth Macarthur Agriculture Institute, which currently rears the sterile males, provided a better understanding of the role sterile males could play in a New Zealand eradication program in the future and the arrangements that would be needed. 
 
Grower News
9 February 2017
Wanted: Stink Bugs
9 February 2017
Researchers at Plant and Food Te Puke want your stink bugs!  If you find stink bugs such as the Green Vegetable Bug (Nezara viridula) as pictured, please collect them. These can be found found...
Wanted: Stink Bugs
9 February 2017
Researchers at Plant and Food Te Puke want your stink bugs! 
If you find stink bugs such as the Green Vegetable Bug (Nezara viridula) as pictured, please collect them. These can be found found year-round in New Zealand gardens. In orchards stink bugs are often found on fruiting weeds such as black nightshade (Solanum nigrum), in the sward, shelterbelts and gully margins, and even on vines. They can produce a significant odour when disturbed. 
 
The Green Vegetable Bug offers valuable insights for scientists who are able to use it as a stand-in for the highly-problematic Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). The BMSB is not present in New Zealand but is a major biosecurity threat. 
 
Aleise Puketapu from Plant and Food Research says: “Our research is in preparation for a likely incursion of BMSB in New Zealand. BMSB poses a real threat to the country and to the kiwifruit industry so we all need to be on our toes”.
 
If you can supply stink bugs or would like more information about them, please contact Aleise on Aleise.Puketapu@plantandfood.co.nz or (07) 928 9827.
If you think you have encountered a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, contact MPI urgently on 0800 80 99 66.  
 
Biosecurity News
26 January 2017
Preparing for fruit fly
26 January 2017
KVH and the other signatories who signed the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies, last year agreed on the approach to readiness and response activities. While getting to this point was a...
Preparing for fruit fly
26 January 2017


KVH and the other signatories who signed the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies, last year agreed on the approach to readiness and response activities. While getting to this point was a significant achievement in itself, it has also led to a review of areas that can be improved.

A technical working group has been established to progress the readiness and response technical improvements that have been agreed, of which the priorities are;
  • Optimising the current surveillance programme for early detection. New Zealand maintains a world class surveillance grid for fruit fly that involves over 7500 traps, which has successfully resulted in early detection of fruit fly on nine occasions enabling eradication.  But are there opportunities for further improvement, including locations, period, and lures that are used in the traps?
  • Pre-agreeing the major risks in a response and identifying opportunities to reduce cost associated with low risk activities.  Examples during the Grey Lynn response include managing risk associated with major sporting events and supermarkets located within the controlled area.  Understanding true risk associated with these activities will enable us to manage the risks appropriately.
  • Reviewing the current Fruit Fly Response Standard. Are there opportunities to enhance this standard using new technology or best practice developed internationally, or our own learnings from recent responses?  Are there any activities that are not required which could result in a future eradication being undertaken successfully, without having to spend $1.5 million responding to the detection of a single fruit fly?
KVH is well represented in this process, with Barry O’Neil serving as chairman of the Fruit Fly Council which oversees the Operational Agreement, and Matt Dyck as an observer on the Technical Working Group tasked with delivering projects to improve our readiness and response capability.
 
Company Notices
26 January 2017
KVH board farewells Lorry Leydon
26 January 2017
  The KVH board would like to acknowledge the work of Lorry Leydon, who has been an associate board director for the past two years. Lorry’s reflections from his time on the board are...
KVH board farewells Lorry Leydon
26 January 2017
 
The KVH board would like to acknowledge the work of Lorry Leydon, who has been an associate board director for the past two years. Lorry’s reflections from his time on the board are below:
 
“It seems a long time ago when I walked in to my first board meeting at KVH. It was an exciting opportunity for me, and I was looking forward to observing how the cogs turned in the inner sanctum of the boardroom. My experience from that very first day was of an extremely cohesive board, committed to the New Zealand kiwifruit industry.
 
My two years on the board has overseen a transition period for KVH, where the primary focus has gradually shifted from Psa-V to the wider realm of biosecurity. As we move out of the shadow of Psa, it is important to remember the lessons we have learned, and ensure that we remain vigilant to all possible threats. It is essential that growers don’t become complacent, and that KVH is supported in their role to protect New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry from biosecurity threats.
 
I would like to thank KVH for the initiative in developing an associate director role – this is a rare opportunity which has given me a great experience in governance and leadership. I would also like to thank my fellow directors for their guidance and tutelage over the last few years. Lastly, I would like to thank the whole team at KVH, and acknowledge their hard work and dedication on behalf of the kiwifruit industry.”
 

 

Biosecurity News
26 January 2017
Stopping BMSB
26 January 2017
KVH has been working with industry groups and MPI to develop an Operational Agreement for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug under the GIA partnership. Industry groups met yesterday to consider the...
Stopping BMSB
26 January 2017


KVH has been working with industry groups and MPI to develop an Operational Agreement for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug under the GIA partnership.

Industry groups met yesterday to consider the possible approach to cost sharing between MPI and industry, along with how we can agree to the industry split of the costs involved.  Our objective is to have an OA in place by mid-2017, which will ensure we are doing everything we can to stop BMSB establishing in NZ.

KVH is also a core member of a steering group preparing an application to be able to release an effective parasitoid wasp of BMSB (The Asian wasp Trissolcus japonicus), should BMSB arrive in NZ.  The wasp parasitises the eggs of BMSB and when established destroys up to 75% of the eggs.  The objective is to have the application for release ready to present to the Environmental Protection Agency in September 2017.
 
Biosecurity News
26 January 2017
Kiwifruit sector Operational Agreement
26 January 2017
KVH and MPI are finalising a kiwifruit sector operational agreement under the GIA partnership for pests and pathogens that are specific to the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors, and are working to have...
Kiwifruit sector Operational Agreement
26 January 2017

KVH and MPI are finalising a kiwifruit sector operational agreement under the GIA partnership for pests and pathogens that are specific to the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors, and are working to have the agreement in place in March 2017.  

The agreement will initially focus on the major threats to our industry, including Ceratocystis fimbriata, Verticillium wilt, non-NZ strains of Psa, and invasive Phytophthora’s.  It will include readiness and response plans for the major sector risks that will enable us to be able to find and respond immediately to eradicate if these are found in NZ.  It also confirms cost sharing between MPI and KVH on a 50/50 basis for the costs involved.

Biosecurity News
26 January 2017
Super biosecurity puppies
26 January 2017
The Ministry for Primary Industries has a new litter of a super breed of biosecurity detector puppies. Born on 24 November from a beagle and a harrier hound it is the first time MPI had crossed these...
Super biosecurity puppies
26 January 2017

The Ministry for Primary Industries has a new litter of a super breed of biosecurity detector puppies. Born on 24 November from a beagle and a harrier hound it is the first time MPI had crossed these breeds for detection work.

MPI Detection Technology Manager Brett Hickman says MPI has high hopes for the puppies, which will grow to about the size of a labrador. "We normally use beagles as biosecurity dogs. The beagle-harrier crosses will be taller than beagles, making it easier for them to sniff backpacks and airport luggage stacked on trolleys."
 
If the new puppies pass their training, they will start work in 2018 detecting food and other items that pose biosecurity risk to New Zealand.
 
Mr Hickman says MPI has 60 biosecurity detector dog teams operating at New Zealand airports and ports. “They are an essential part of New Zealand’s biosecurity defences, particularly when it comes to locating seeds and other smaller risk items that can be hard to detect by baggage x-ray screening.”
 
Photo credit: David White/FairfaxNZ
 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz