Search Site

Newsroom

Print these articles
Company Notices
22 February 2018
Most used pages on the KVH website
22 February 2018
KVH closely monitors use of the website to make sure the information we are providing is useful and practical, and easy to find. For the three months November 2017 - January 2018 there were more...
Most used pages on the KVH website
22 February 2018

KVH closely monitors use of the website to make sure the information we are providing is useful and practical, and easy to find.

For the three months November 2017 - January 2018 there were more than 22,000 views of pages on the KVH site, by more than 6,500 people. Consistently among the most used pages for each day over the period were the Psa risk model and spray product list.

Grower News
22 February 2018
Quiz answers
22 February 2018
Here are the answers to the biosecurity quiz: 1.      Damien O’Connor and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), or the recently accounced Biosecurity New...
Quiz answers
22 February 2018

Here are the answers to the biosecurity quiz:

1.      Damien O’Connor and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), or the recently accounced Biosecurity New Zealand.

2.      A number of incursions including but not limited to Myrtle rust; Mycoplasma bovis affecting the dairy industry; Queensland Fruit Fly incursion in Auckland; Velvetleaf, pea weevil, Bonamia ostraeae in oysters. 

3.     Contestants were awarded a mark for displaying awareness of lessons from Psa, which are wide but include develop response/action plans in advance; be aware of biosecurity threats from other countries and learn from how they have responsed to outbreaks; value of industry working closely with government and pre-agreeing roles, responsbilities and costs during an incursion; have controls/measures in place for the import of produce and plant material; carefully manage/restrict high-risk imports; everyone is a biosecurity risk manager and has a part to play; keep good records for tracing; value of industry working with stakeholders such as banks to ensure continued industry support; importance of research and development and breeding programmes.

4.     If you, or anyone you know, has accidently bought fruit or vegetables into New Zealand make sure it is reported to MPI and then appropriately destroyed (bagged and put in the rubbish is the best way, not composted). MPI would provide guidance about what to do next, so reporting is the key behaviour we are looking for here.

5.     Kiwifruit has a long list of potential threats that contestants could have chosen from, however the most common correct answers include Fruit flies; Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB); White Peach Scale; Brazilian Wilt/Ceratocystis fimbriata; Verticillium Wilt, Invasive Phytophthora, Psa-non New Zealand strains.

6.     So that traceability back to source can take place in the event of an incursion; to avoid spread of unwanted pests between orchards and regions.

7.     Restrict and track access to the orchard; clean everything that comes across the orchard/property boundary; have clear agreements with contractors about what must happen on site; undertake regular monitoring; report the unusual; keep orchards free from weeds/rubbish which could host unwanted pests; keep up-to-date with information about current/seasonal threats and share that information with others.  

8.     Contestants had to name the incursion but also the state or city where this was occuring. Most named the high risk incurions that have been profiled in our Bulletin newsletter including Queensland Fruit Fly (Adelaide, Tasmania, Western Australia) and Mediterranian Fruit Fly (Adelaide), but other incursions were also accepted.

9.     0800 80 99 66 – the MPI exotic pest and disease hotliine.

10.  First on the left is the BMSB. It’s bigger than similar bugs already found in New Zealand, has striped antennae and striped bands on the abdomen.

 

Media Releases
12 February 2018
Keep sending shiploads of BMSB packing
12 February 2018
Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, says the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) should be congratulated for taking the right action in turning back ships that have...
Keep sending shiploads of BMSB packing
12 February 2018

Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, says the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) should be congratulated for taking the right action in turning back ships that have arrived at our ports carrying hundreds of unwanted pests.

“Over the last few days MPI has turned around two large cargo vessels because one of the most damaging pests to the kiwifruit and wider horticultural industries - the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) – was found hitchhiking on both ships and in used vehicles onboard.”

The BMSB is a pest that could destroy New Zealand’s fruit and vegetable industries. It also infests homes, ruins gardens, and stinks when crushed says Barry.

“It’s not in New Zealand yet and we want to keep it that way – we must do everything we can to keep it out.”

“That is why KVH is pleased with the ongoing diligence of MPI to detect these stink bugs at the border and we fully support the serious steps they have been taking to manage the risk of it getting here, including these recent cases of requiring treatment to take place offshore before allowing high-risk ships and cargo to enter and unload goods at our Ports.”

“The decisions may not always be popular with those importing goods, but the rules are very clear, and they are stringent for a reason. Unwanted pests like the BMSB could cause hundreds of millions of dollars damage to the New Zealand economy and heavily affect growers’ livelihoods if it were to establish here.”

Working alongside MPI, industry groups including KVH have been working hard to raise awareness of the threat and impact of BMSB crossing our borders. This work has included meetings with importers and transporters of machinery and other high-risk goods to ensure they are fully aware of the biosecurity measures they must take. KVH has also been working with kiwifruit growers, Zespri, MPI and the wider kiwifruit industry to ensure preparedness for BMSB, if it were to arrive and establish here. This includes running awareness programmes and simulation exercises.

More information about BMSB, including video showing the destructive impacts it has had on kiwifruit orchards in Italy and the way it is affecting lifestyles in the USA, can be viewed on the KVH website.

Grower News
8 February 2018
Unusual symptoms made simple
8 February 2018
When information about unusual symptoms is reported to KVH (by growers, contractors, packhouse staff and others visiting orchards) it is then looked into to be sure that any biosecurity risk is...
Unusual symptoms made simple
8 February 2018

When information about unusual symptoms is reported to KVH (by growers, contractors, packhouse staff and others visiting orchards) it is then looked into to be sure that any biosecurity risk is identified, managed and the growers involved are well supported if any further action needs to be taken.

KVH prepares full reports on every investigation which you can now read about on our website using our handy and simple table that outlines unusual symptoms that have been seen on kiwifruit orchards and includes photos.

This information is provided to help growers, and others in the kiwifruit industry, identify similar symptoms they may be seeing on their own properties and to increase general awareness of how growers need to be reporting unusual symptoms that they may be seeing.

Grower News
8 February 2018
Keep the reports coming
8 February 2018
KVH often receives phone calls and emails from growers, packhouses, and members of the public who think they may have found a pest or bug from our most unwanted list. Although the finds often turn...
Keep the reports coming
8 February 2018

KVH often receives phone calls and emails from growers, packhouses, and members of the public who think they may have found a pest or bug from our most unwanted list. Although the finds often turn out to be native, the reports are a good thing and show that as an industry we’re on the lookout for biosecurity risk.

The message is the same for growers, contractors and anyone else on-orchard: stay vigilant, be on the lookout and report anything unusual. Please take a photo (very rarely will we need to see the actual specimen) of what you find and send it to us at info@kvh.org.nz so we can have a look at it for you.

Don’t be afraid to report any suspect finds. Early detection is key to eradication and the sooner you alert us the more we can do to help.

We’re at the height of the risk-period for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and fruit flies. Be especially aware of any larvae in fruit. Read more about latest interceptions on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
8 February 2018
Moth plant: act now before pods form
8 February 2018
Now is the time to destroy any missed moth plant vines, while they are still clearly visible and flowering, and before pods form or mature. Moth plant is a South American vine; invasive in New...
Moth plant: act now before pods form
8 February 2018

Now is the time to destroy any missed moth plant vines, while they are still clearly visible and flowering, and before pods form or mature.

Moth plant is a South American vine; invasive in New Zealand and unfortunately well-established in Northland, Auckland, Waikato and the coastal Bay of Plenty where it can heavily infest orchard shelter belts. The large seed pods open over winter months to release hundreds of wind-blown seeds.

The simplest and most effective control method is to use a sharp spade and chip the vines out of the ground.  Mature moth plant vines are not easy to kill with herbicide: cut the vine to within 20cm of ground level and apply one part glyphosate to five parts water, plus a sticker such as Pulse, to the vine base.

Moth plant harbours passion vine hopper, slows down orchard shelter trimmers and is a poisonous plant.  The sap can cause severe dermatitis, so wear gloves, protective clothing and consider eye protection.

Grower News
8 February 2018
Support our talented young horticulturalists
8 February 2018
Head along to the Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition at the Te Puke A&P Show this weekend and support the young horticulturalists vying for the title. The six competitors –...
Support our talented young horticulturalists
8 February 2018

Head along to the Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition at the Te Puke A&P Show this weekend and support the young horticulturalists vying for the title.

The six competitors – known for their passion for the industry and exciting futures – will battle it out in a series of theoretical and practical horticultural activities during the full day event, including a biosecurity round run by KVH. The competition culminates with a speech contest at the gala dinner and awards ceremony the following Thursday night.

Learn more about the competitors here.

KVH will also be at the A&P Show to answer any questions you may have about the work we’re doing to keep unwanted pests and diseases from establishing within our kiwifruit orchards and communities. 

Biosecurity News
8 February 2018
Managing imports and the BMSB threat
8 February 2018
KVH has put forward a submission to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on proposed amendments to the import standard for ‘vehicles, machinery and equipment’. Although there are...
Managing imports and the BMSB threat
8 February 2018

KVH has put forward a submission to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on proposed amendments to the import standard for ‘vehicles, machinery and equipment’.

Although there are multiple potential ways BMSB could enter New Zealand, interception data demonstrates that the ‘vehicles, machinery and equipment’ pathway is high-risk. This is especially the case from countries where BMSB is found in large numbers, undergoing population growth, or expansion across regions – for example in the USA, Italy, and several other countries across Europe.

MPI have done a good job by introducing new measures on this pathway to provide greater biosecurity protection for New Zealand and KVH fully supports this. Our submission provided additional feedback to strengthen proposed measures and reduce the risk of BMSB establishing.

The main points our submission to MPI specifically covered were:

-        the need to carefully manage, and be able to regularly amend, the countries to which BMSB treatments apply;

-        the importance of clear and practical regulations around the application of heat/fumigation treatments, and storage and transport of consignments before export to New Zealand,

-         treatment verification and follow-up in the event of failure.

Growers will be kept up-to-date with further KVH involvement in the consultation process. 

 

Biosecurity News
8 February 2018
From the frontline
8 February 2018
The summer rush is on and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has been handling a substantial volume of passengers at our airports.  Numbers at Auckland have been up 5% on last year, and...
From the frontline
8 February 2018

The summer rush is on and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has been handling a substantial volume of passengers at our airports.  Numbers at Auckland have been up 5% on last year, and more than 18,000 travellers were processed on the airports busiest day.

Statistics for December alone: 

·         692,088 air passengers processed

·         1,412 infringement notices issued

·         3,008 mail items opened and inspected

·         1,233 loaded containers inspected

Some weird and wonderful interceptions of interest from our borders over the period include: 

·         A Belgian air passenger was forced to leave New Zealand after attempting to smuggle three sausages (spotted by an x-ray operator) into Auckland in a backpack.

·         A 16kg box of abandoned apples found at Wellington airport. MPI officials inspected them and thankfully there were no signs of fruit fly found.

·         An ornamental reindeer made of dried vines was part of the Christmas decorations on a private jet from China. Because the plane was headed for other domestic airports the reindeer couldn’t travel any further and had to be destroyed.

·         A Western Conifer Seed Bug (from the same family as Brown Marmorated Stink Bug) was found in an imported vehicle. The bug has an appetite for fir trees and is a nuisance in homes over winter.

·         Taika Waititi and Hilary Swank were in New Zealand over the summer and he took the opportunity to remind social media followers of the apple incident of 2005, when MPI fined the actress for not declaring an apple.  The post certainly had people thinking about New Zealand’s biosecurity rules as it built up more than 60,000 likes.

MPI produce a regular newsletter about what’s being done at the border to keep unwanted pests and diseases at bay. It also includes interesting data and you can subscribe here.

 

Biosecurity News
8 February 2018
Controlling the stink bug problem
8 February 2018
KVH has been working with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), Horticulture NZ, and other industry groups on an application to release a biological control that would help the fight for...
Controlling the stink bug problem
8 February 2018

KVH has been working with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), Horticulture NZ, and other industry groups on an application to release a biological control that would help the fight for eradication in the event of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) establishing here.

One of the most promising control strategies currently being pursued, the Samurai Wasp (Trissolcus japonicas) is a natural enemy of the BMSB and it’s thought to be effective in suppressing populations by up to 80%.

The application to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is on behalf of the BMSB Council – which KVH is a member of, alongside other signatories to the BMSB Operational Agreement – and seeks official pre-approval for the importation and release of the Samurai Wasp into the New Zealand environment, when there is a BMSB incursion or established population found.

The application is seeking pre-approval as rapid release of large numbers of the wasp during the early phase of a BMSB incursion would be a critical part of eradication efforts. Even if eradication wasn’t successful, early release and establishment of populations of the wasp would still act as a biocontrol and reduce the likelihood of large populations of BMSB developing.

Any grower who wants to know more about the work being done in this area can contact KVH for more information.

The full application document will be made available as part of the EPA consultation process, which will also include a submission period that growers can take part in to show support or raise any concerns. KVH will keep growers updated about the timings around this process. 

Company Notices
1 February 2018
Keep in touch
1 February 2018
KVH offers a range of ways for you to keep up to date with all things related to kiwifruit biosecurity and vine health. We publish articles in our online Newsroom regularly. These articles...
Keep in touch
1 February 2018

KVH offers a range of ways for you to keep up to date with all things related
to kiwifruit biosecurity and vine health.


We publish articles in our online Newsroom regularly.

These articles incorporate feature stories that highlight best practice biosecurity, incursions across the world that we are monitoring, investments in research and development, and how the kiwifruit industry manages the risk of pests spreading in New Zealand.

You can sign up to our e-news Bulletin for fortnightly biosecurity bursts. We distribute Special Bulletins to our e-news database when significant biosecurity events take place.

Those working within the biosecurity or kiwifruit fields can sign up to the monthly Snapshot for a round-up of key information that can be easily re-produced in staff or customer briefings and newsletters.

Don’t forget to follow us on social media for biosecurity tips and news. We have Facebook, Twitter and YouTube pages.

To subscribe or find out more email info@kvh.org.nz or phone 0800 665 825.

 

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
What is GIA and how does it work?
25 January 2018
Ensuring we have an effective biosecurity system is a joint effort. All New Zealanders – industries, individuals, government, and other organisations – need to work together and jointly...
What is GIA and how does it work?
25 January 2018

Ensuring we have an effective biosecurity system is a joint effort. All New Zealanders – industries, individuals, government, and other organisations – need to work together and jointly take responsibility for the risks they create or are best placed to manage.

It’s for more than just interventions that occur at the border. It includes activities to manage risk offshore and activities past our border to eradicate or manage pests and diseases.

The Government Industry Agreement (GIA) initiative is a partnership between government and industry for improving New Zealand’s biosecurity. It involves working together to plan biosecurity readiness and response activities, and sharing decision-making, as well as costs.

The GIA provides the opportunity for joint decision making of the things that industry says are important. It provides certainty that the things that really matter to industry are being addressed. Better preparedness will result in faster and less costly responses that are more likely to eradicate or control pests and diseases. This will likely also reduce impacts on production and market access.

KVH was the first primary industry to sign the GIA Deed in May 2014. This marked a significant achievement for the kiwifruit industry and government.

The GIA Deed outlines the principles for the partnership and the commitments that each Signatory makes. For example, as a Deed Signatory, KVH negotiates and agrees the priority pests and diseases of most concern to the kiwifruit industry and agrees actions to minimise the risk and impact of an incursion. We work through the details of responses, including roles and responsibilities and cost-sharing.

KVH has been at the forefront of formally developing and finalising these details, known as Operational Agreements (OA). The first OA under GIA was the multi-sector agreement for the management of fruit fly in New Zealand. In March 2017 KVH signed a second agreement, on behalf of the kiwifruit and kiwiberry sectors, to help reduce the damaging impacts of four sector specific threats - Ceratocystis fimbriata, Verticillium Wilt, Psa-non New Zealand strains and Invasive Phytophthoras. A third OA for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) was signed in mid-July 2017.

For more information about GIA and how KVH is working with government to fight pest threats, read the feature article in the KVH Annual Report. You can also read more here about KVH readiness and response activities.
 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz