Search Site

Newsroom

Print these articles
R&D News
2 April 2015
Compost trial using reject kiwifruit
2 April 2015
KVH has been working with the Bay of Plenty Regional Council to reduce the amount of wild kiwifruit establishing in the Bay of Plenty’s gullies, bush margins and production forests. ...
Compost trial using reject kiwifruit
2 April 2015

KVH has been working with the Bay of Plenty Regional Council to reduce the amount of wild kiwifruit establishing in the Bay of Plenty’s gullies, bush margins and production forests. 

Wild kiwifruit is an environmentally damaging vine and may harbour Psa-V or other pests, which can then spread to nearby orchards.  Reject fruit fed to livestock may be a potential seed-source of further wild vines, establishing when birds such as waxeyes feed on the softening fruit and distribute the seed.

A trial was undertaken by Kawerau-based Plateau Bark to see if compost could be made using reject fruit (and associated debris) mixed with pulp waste from the Norske Skog Tasman Ltd pulp and paper mill.  The composted material was regularly turned and monitored.  The trial was overseen by Plant and Food Research. 

Temperatures within the compost piles were logged and found to be regularly above 60 degrees Celcius. Testing confirmed the end product was Psa-V ‘not-detected’ and kiwifruit seed had been destroyed during the high-temperature composting process.

KVH is now advancing the process to name Plateau Bark as a KVH-approved compost manufacturer using reject kiwifruit.  Ongoing approval will depend on the compost product being consistently manufactured to prescribed standards, regularly monitored and free of Psa-V, other harmful pathogens and viable kiwifruit seed. 

The relevant KVH Protocols will be amended to allow KVH-approved compost manufacturers to spread compost containing reject fruit, made to prescribed standards, onto Psa-V positive orchards in Recovery Regions.

For more information on this project, contact John Mather or Karyn Lowry at KVH on 0800 665 825.
 

Protocols & Movement Controls
2 April 2015
Nursery plant movements
2 April 2015
All nurseries that sell and distribute kiwifruit plants are required to register with KVH on an annual basis.  Non-registered nurseries or nurseries that have let their registration lapse cannot...
Nursery plant movements
2 April 2015

All nurseries that sell and distribute kiwifruit plants are required to register with KVH on an annual basis.  Non-registered nurseries or nurseries that have let their registration lapse cannot dispatch kiwifruit plants. A list of KVH-registered nurseries is available on the KVH website here.

To avoid supply shortages, growers need to order plants well in advance so nurseries can anticipate industry demand. Plants ordered for dispatch after 1 October 2016 must be certified under the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS).

Growers also have an obligation when purchasing plants to ensure the nursery is registered and movement controls are complied with. If you have any concerns about the plants you are purchasing this season and/or the movement controls associated with them, please call KVH to check first – 0800 665 825.

Transport requirements
KVH Protocols state that kiwifruit plant material (budwood, pollen, rootstock etc.) and other risk items (harvest bins) must be securely covered when moving between sites/regions to reduce the risk of disease spread. Nursery plants are also required to be sprayed with copper prior to dispatch and tested for Psa-V within six weeks of movement occurring.

KVH Protocols provide protection for transit regions that have limited Psa-V infection or where Psa-V has not yet been detected.

If you are planning on moving plant material or other risk items, please check the KVH Protocols on the website. If you are unsure please give us a call – 0800 665 825.
 

Grower News
19 March 2015
2015 KVH Seasonal Management Guide now available
19 March 2015
The 2015 Psa-V Seasonal Management Guide is now available on the KVH website – click here. This new guide provides a basis for growers to build their individual Psa-V Orchard Management Plans...
2015 KVH Seasonal Management Guide now available
19 March 2015

The 2015 Psa-V Seasonal Management Guide is now available on the KVH website – click here.

This new guide provides a basis for growers to build their individual Psa-V Orchard Management Plans for the coming season.

The 2015 guide incorporates year-round advice for managing Psa-V. Previous Seasonal Management Guides have been split into Autumn/Winter and Spring/Summer seasons.

Grower News
19 March 2015
Autumn and harvest tips for a successful season
19 March 2015
Good management of Psa-V through autumn helps minimise disease levels seen in the following spring. Maintain a protective spray programme throughout autumn. Ensure cover is in place prior...
Autumn and harvest tips for a successful season
19 March 2015

Good management of Psa-V through autumn helps minimise disease levels seen in the following spring.

  • Maintain a protective spray programme throughout autumn.
  • Ensure cover is in place prior to high-risk weather or as soon as possible following weather events.
  • Immediately postharvest, apply copper and Actigard™ to protect fruit stalks. Consider using adjuvants to improve spray coverage at this time. If canopy condition allows, reapply Actigard™ three weeks later to extend protection into the leaf-fall period. A maximum of four Actigard™ applications (including soil applied sprays) are allowed per season.
  • Avoid spray drift of postharvest sprays onto unharvested fruit.  Spray residues limit market access for fruit and can impact customer confidence. Report any problems to your exporter.  Thoroughly clean spray tanks to prevent risk of residues.
Biosecurity News
19 March 2015
Queensland fruit fly response - one month on
19 March 2015
The response to the Queensland Fruit Fly outbreak in Auckland has now been operating for more than a month and is likely to continue for many more. Field work, including intensive trapping, baiting...
Queensland fruit fly response - one month on
19 March 2015

The response to the Queensland Fruit Fly outbreak in Auckland has now been operating for more than a month and is likely to continue for many more.

Field work, including intensive trapping, baiting and fruit collection and sampling also continue.

To date, 14 adult fruit flies had been found within the controlled area; and fruit fly larvae had been found in five separate properties within very close proximity of each other.

The infected properties continue to receive intensive ground treatment for fruit fly, including targeted foliage spraying and the use of insecticide granules. The ground surrounding the trees where larvae were found has been thoroughly sprayed and sealed with a polythene plastic cover (pictured above).

Any future developments will be communicated through the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
19 March 2015
Research to determine pathogenicity of Ceratocystis fimbriata on kiwifruit
19 March 2015
Ceratocystis fimbriata is a fungal pathogen that is causing significant damage to kiwifruit orchards in Brazil, with some growers reporting 50% vine loss over the past five years. The sudden...
Research to determine pathogenicity of Ceratocystis fimbriata on kiwifruit
19 March 2015

Ceratocystis fimbriata is a fungal pathogen that is causing significant damage to kiwifruit orchards in Brazil, with some growers reporting 50% vine loss over the past five years.

The sudden appearance of this pathogen in kiwifruit in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil is considered particularly alarming as kiwifruit is highly susceptible and the production impacts of the pathogen threaten the viability of this industry in Brazil. There have been no reports of impacts to kiwifruit from this pathogen outside of Brazil to date.

Planned research
New Zealand does have a strain of the C. fimbriata complex, causing black rot on kumara. Research is planned to determine if this strain is pathogenic to kiwifruit.

Control options against C. fimbriata have limited effectiveness and developing resistant or more tolerant cultivars is considered the best course of action to prepare for this pathogen.

A two year research project is being undertaken that will screen a number of C. fimbriata isolates, including the NZ and Brazilian isolates, for pathogenicity against a number of kiwifruit cultivars. This will allow the identification of:

  1. Isolates of C. fimbriata that are pathogenic to kiwifruit
  2. Identification of tolerant / resistant cultivars or rootstocks.

Components of the research will be done offshore, however cultivar testing will require the Brazilian isolates to be imported into a New Zealand containment facility. Details on how the pathogen will be contained are provided in the document: Physical containment of plant pathogens.

Please see the KVH website for:

R&D News
19 March 2015
Improved R&D website now live
19 March 2015
KVH has made some improvements to the R&D section of the website to make it much more user-friendly. Growers still need to be logged in to view the full R&D section. The main changes: ...
Improved R&D website now live
19 March 2015

KVH has made some improvements to the R&D section of the website to make it much more user-friendly. Growers still need to be logged in to view the full R&D section.

The main changes:

Let us know your feedback on the new site – email KVH

Biosecurity News
9 March 2015
Queensland Fruit Fly Update 09.03.15
9 March 2015
Situation update Over the weekend (7/8 March), MPI’s field laboratory detected Queensland fruit fly larvae in windfall fruit collected from two properties nearby to the original affected...
Queensland Fruit Fly Update 09.03.15
9 March 2015

Situation update

  • Over the weekend (7/8 March), MPI’s field laboratory detected Queensland fruit fly larvae in windfall fruit collected from two properties nearby to the original affected property.
  • There are now a total of four properties in very close proximity that are receiving ground treatment for fruit fly. This includes targeted ground spraying and use of insecticide granules.
  • No adult flies were detected over the weekend (7/8 March) and the total number of adult Queensland fruit flies captured in Auckland remains at 14.
  • The situation remains that MPI is working to eradicate a localised population of fruit fly.
  • A response end date to the operation cannot be confirmed, but it is expected to take several months.
  • Click here to view MPI’s information on the website.
Biosecurity News
9 March 2015
Queensland Fruit Fly Stats 09.03.15
9 March 2015
Click here for the updated...
Queensland Fruit Fly Stats 09.03.15
9 March 2015

Click here for the updated statistics.

Biosecurity News
5 March 2015
Export Restriction Zone (ERZ)
5 March 2015
The ERZ is a defined zone from which host material intended for export cannot be harvested, packed or stored. MPI have defined a compulsory ERZ which is 3.5 km radius from each detection site. ...
Export Restriction Zone (ERZ)
5 March 2015

The ERZ is a defined zone from which host material intended for export cannot be harvested, packed or stored. MPI have defined a compulsory ERZ which is 3.5 km radius from each detection site.

  • Click here to view MPI’s ERZ map.

All host material transiting the MPI defined ERZ must meet the pest proofing requirements to be eligible for export certification.  MPI Plant Exports have developed pest proofing requirements and procedures which are available on the MPI website – click here.
 

Biosecurity News
5 March 2015
Queensland fruit fly response continues 05.03.15
5 March 2015
The total number of fruit flies found stands at 13. Two further male fruit flies were trapped within the controlled area over the last two days.  There is no new evidence to suggest the...
Queensland fruit fly response continues 05.03.15
5 March 2015

The total number of fruit flies found stands at 13. Two further male fruit flies were trapped within the controlled area over the last two days.  There is no new evidence to suggest the situation is anything more than a localised population of fruit fly that can be eradicated.

Field work continues with a focus on the surveillance trapping system. Field teams are also applying insecticide bait throughout the Controlled Area, informing residents about the controls and inspecting gardens and rubbish bins.

  • Click here to view KVH’s frequently asked questions.
  • Click here for MPI’s frequently asked questions.
Biosecurity News
5 March 2015
KiwiNet profile: Jan Purdie
5 March 2015
Jan Purdie, Apata Jan was deployed through KiwiNet and spent five days in the response operations in Grey Lynn. Role: Surveillance. The surveillance team spends their day walking from house to...
KiwiNet profile: Jan Purdie
5 March 2015

Jan Purdie, Apata

Jan was deployed through KiwiNet and spent five days in the response operations in Grey Lynn.

Role: Surveillance. The surveillance team spends their day walking from house to house identifying and recording host plants on properties and collecting information about fruit and vegetable movements.

Within hours of receiving a call requesting help with the fruit fly response, Jan arrived at the Whenuapai Airbase in northwest Auckland for her first briefing.

Jan spent the next five days in Zone B as part of the surveillance team. This meant going from door to door in the controlled area talking to residents and asking them a series of questions about how they were disposing their fruit waste, whether or not they kept compost, checking properties for host plants and asking them about their recent activities around fruit and vegetable movements.

This information was recorded on manual forms, returned to HQ and later used by the fruit collection and tracing teams.

Dealing with so many people each day from very diverse cultures and backgrounds meant the surveillance people had to have good face to face communication and people skills.

Jan said local residents were very receptive and showed a lot of concern about fruit fly being discovered in their area. “Most residents were always happy to help and we met some truly wonderful people in the area. The locals and the people working in the response were doing all they could to help eradicate this fruit fly.”

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz