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Biosecurity News
14 May 2015
Australian horticulture get funding boost to fight fruit fly
14 May 2015
The Australian government has provided their horticulture sector with a funding boost of A$5.8m for two research projects. One project aims to deliver a farm-level support tool to assist growers with...
Australian horticulture get funding boost to fight fruit fly
14 May 2015

The Australian government has provided their horticulture sector with a funding boost of A$5.8m for two research projects. One project aims to deliver a farm-level support tool to assist growers with orchard activities, including early detection of pest and disease outbreaks; and the other project will look into area-wide management of fruit fly providing guidelines for efficient and effective pest suppression and stakeholder adoption.

Horticulture Innovation Australia, who are leading the projects, state that Queensland Fruit Fly results in losses of more than A$100m each year to Australia and is a major barrier to offshore markets.

Matt Dyck, KVH Biosecurity

Biosecurity News
14 May 2015
PMAC fruit fly preparedness project
14 May 2015
As advised in a previous Bulletin, KVH and Zespri are members of the Plant Market Access Council (PMAC) fruit fly preparedness project. This project aims to pre-emptively agree market access...
PMAC fruit fly preparedness project
14 May 2015

As advised in a previous Bulletin, KVH and Zespri are members of the Plant Market Access Council (PMAC) fruit fly preparedness project. This project aims to pre-emptively agree market access conditions with key markets in the event of an incursion of a significant fruit fly species in New Zealand and minimise market access impacts.  Below is an update on the project.

  • A negotiating protocol for key trading partners has been developed which demonstrates how NZ will be able to export fruit fly-free product during a fruit fly incursion and/or if fruit fly were to establish here.
  • A scientific based model has been developed for inclusion in the protocol. The model calculates the key triggers that determine the status of the response by taking into account things like location – i.e. is the location rural or urban.

Negotiations with trading partners will begin once the protocol and the model are finalised and are likely to be a lengthy process. While some negotiations may take less than a year, it is possible that many of them will take longer. Ironically, it’s believed the response to the QFF in Grey Lynn this year may reduce the length of some of these negotiations. In some instances, information in the protocol was used during this recent response to liaise with key officials in some markets.

The negotiation process will be carried out in three stages based on the potential zones identified in an incursion response. Three different categories for negotiation have been identified:

  • Outside the designated control zone where export should be able to continue without any additional controls (phase 1)
  • Outside the controlled zone but passing through it to be exported and so requiring specific protection (phase 2)
  • Within the controlled zone requiring treatments to control any fruit fly (phase 3)

Once pre-emptive agreements are in place with key trading partners, these agreements should minimise market access impacts during a fruit fly response or incursion.

Barry O’Neil, KVH Chief Executive

Protocols & Movement Controls
14 May 2015
Working collectively to manage abandoned orchards
14 May 2015
There are now 108 abandoned orchards on the KVH register that have either been removed, or are in the process of being removed, since 2013. KVH continues to work with land owners and regional...
Working collectively to manage abandoned orchards
14 May 2015

There are now 108 abandoned orchards on the KVH register that have either been removed, or are in the process of being removed, since 2013.

KVH continues to work with land owners and regional councils to manage these orchards which pose a risk of Psa-V spread.

Over the last six months Bay of Plenty Regional Council has contributed $15,400 toward abandoned orchard removal costs in the region.

The removal of a 2.5 hectare abandoned orchard in Maketu was completed in April. The kiwifruit was planted adjacent to a chestnut orchard with vines smothering many of the chestnuts and willow shelter belt, killing many of the host trees.  The property Trust/owners and Bay of Plenty Regional Council assisted with removal costs.

Plans are progressing for the removal of two large abandoned orchards (totalling 4.7ha) near Ruatoria; and the removal of a one-hectare very abandoned orchard at Collingwood in Golden Bay is also progressing.  The kiwifruit vines and structures are heavily interspersed with mature ponga, mahoe and other native plants. 

John Mather, KVH Biosecurity
 

Grower News
14 May 2015
KVH meets John Key
14 May 2015
Representatives from KVH met with Prime Minister John Key yesterday when he visited the kiwifruit industry as part of a day-long visit to the Bay of Plenty. KVH took the brief opportunity to talk to...
KVH meets John Key
14 May 2015

Representatives from KVH met with Prime Minister John Key yesterday when he visited the kiwifruit industry as part of a day-long visit to the Bay of Plenty.

KVH took the brief opportunity to talk to Mr Key about KVH’s recent areas of focus including the industry’s participation in the Queensland fruit fly response in Auckland, raising public awareness of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and our role in Government Industry Agreements.  Mr Key was particularly interested in the BMSB and its impact on primary industries should it establish in New Zealand.

Mr Key spoke to a crowd of around 200 industry people and acknowledged the biosecurity challenges New Zealand faces as a small trading country and the many ways biosecurity risks can come into New Zealand.

During the visit Mr Key also paid tribute to kiwifruit industry for its ability to recover in the wake of Psa-V.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications
 

Grower News
14 May 2015
International Psa-V update
14 May 2015
Zespri’s Shane Max recently gave an update on international Psa-V progression and how their offshore growers were faring as they are now well into the spring growing season. A short,...
International Psa-V update
14 May 2015

Zespri’s Shane Max recently gave an update on international Psa-V progression and how their offshore growers were faring as they are now well into the spring growing season.

A short, seven-minute video presentation with updates from Japan, Korea, France and Italy can be viewed here.

The video concludes with some important take-home messages for New Zealand growers.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications

Grower News
14 May 2015
Dont get complacent with Psa
14 May 2015
While Psa-V progression has slowed during the 2014-15 growing season in most regions, its important growers don’t become complacent with their Psa-V management, particularly as we head into...
Dont get complacent with Psa
14 May 2015

While Psa-V progression has slowed during the 2014-15 growing season in most regions, its important growers don’t become complacent with their Psa-V management, particularly as we head into winter.

A better understanding of managing the disease, combined with a fairly warm, dry growing season has resulted in a significant drop in Psa-V levels on most orchards.

However some orchards, particularly those in challenged locations, still have significant Psa-V pressure impacting on yields and orchard profitability. The photo above shows cane dieback and fruit shrivel on a Gold3 orchard in a challenged Waihi site.

This is a reminder that disease levels could quickly increase in any orchard as the weather becomes cooler and wetter, and if Psa-V is not proactively managed.

Immediately after harvest apply copper to protect fruit stalks. Using summer rates of copper will minimise leaf damage and is recommended if copper is being combined with Actigard™ as leaves need to be actively photosynthesising  for Actigard™ to be properly absorbed.  Where maintenance of leaf condition is less critical apply copper at winter rates. Do not apply Actigard™ to stressed vines.

All growers should be maintaining protective spray programmes in the lead up to winter and ensuring best-practice hygiene is carried out through the remainder of harvest and pruning. This will provide the best possible start for orchards next spring.

Peter Mourits, KVH Operations

Grower News
14 May 2015
Harvest hygiene important in all regions
14 May 2015
As harvest progresses and resources become stretched, growers and harvest contractors are reminded of the importance of ensuring orchard hygiene standards are maintained. KVH has received calls from...
Harvest hygiene important in all regions
14 May 2015

As harvest progresses and resources become stretched, growers and harvest contractors are reminded of the importance of ensuring orchard hygiene standards are maintained. KVH has received calls from growers concerned that they are seeing standards start to slip.

The recent find of a streptomycin resistant strain of Psa-V, identified through the industry resistance testing programme, is a strong reminder of how new threats can arise and growers must stay on their guard to reduce risk of spread of disease.

Clean down areas with suitable sanitisers, and check to ensure no plant material is moved on or off the orchard through people or machinery remain important strategies in protecting orchards from incursions in all regions.

Linda Peacock, KVH Operations

R&D News
14 May 2015
Compost using reject kiwifruit
14 May 2015
KVH has recently received a Plant and Food Research report about the trial of manufacturing compost using reject kiwifruit (and associated debris) mixed with wood pulp. The report found the compost...
Compost using reject kiwifruit
14 May 2015

KVH has recently received a Plant and Food Research report about the trial of manufacturing compost using reject kiwifruit (and associated debris) mixed with wood pulp.

The report found the compost tested ‘not-detected’ for Psa-V and that kiwifruit seed was destroyed during the composting process. 

The Kawerau-based manufacturer is seeking to ramp up production of compost using reject kiwifruit, and to sell the product to primary producers, including kiwifruit orchardists, in the Bay of Plenty. 

KVH has amended its protocols around movement of compost containing kiwifruit material so an approval can be given to compost manufacturers on a case by case basis, as long as the product meets criteria including Psa-V not-detected and kiwifruit seed destruction. 

KVH and the Bay of Plenty Regional Council have been supportive of this research as increasing quantities of reject fruit for composting will likely reduce the amount of fruit available to birds resulting in further wild kiwifruit populations.  There is thought to be about 60,000 tonnes of reject fruit produced from Bay of Plenty post-harvest companies.

KVH has received numerous enquiries from compost suppliers in the last month.  KVH is continuing to work with Zespri’s OPC to develop a KiwiTech Bulletin providing guidance around suitable compost compositions and distribution protocols.

John Mather, KVH Biosecurity

Company Notices
1 May 2015
OPC FON Field Day Schedule
1 May 2015
Click here to view the full schedule of the FON June field...
OPC FON Field Day Schedule
1 May 2015

Click here to view the full schedule of the FON June field days.

Biosecurity News
30 April 2015
MPI launches NZ biosecurity reform project
30 April 2015
Last week the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) launched ‘Biosecurity 2025’ – a project to review and future-proof New Zealand’s biosecurity system and replace the current...
MPI launches NZ biosecurity reform project
30 April 2015

Last week the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) launched ‘Biosecurity 2025’ – a project to review and future-proof New Zealand’s biosecurity system and replace the current 2003 New Zealand Biosecurity Strategy.

MPI will be seeking feedback from biosecurity stakeholders, Māori and the public through a consultation process. To register your interest email biosecurity2025@mpi.govt.nz

KVH Chief Executive Barry O’Neil says: “we look forward to being actively involved in this project with MPI and engaging with industry to ensure the best possible outcome for the kiwifruit industry is achieved. The recent Queensland fruit fly response highlights the critical importance of an effective biosecurity system so this is an excellent opportunity for our industry to contribute to the new Directional Document which will shape New Zealand’s future biosecurity system.”

Growers are encouraged to find out more about the project on MPI’s website and email KVH with any queries or feedback.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications

Protocols & Movement Controls
30 April 2015
Waimea Nurseries join the KPCS
30 April 2015
Waimea Nurseries in Nelson has become the latest nursery to join the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) and is now selling KPCS certified kiwifruit plants. Purchasing certified kiwifruit...
Waimea Nurseries join the KPCS
30 April 2015

Waimea Nurseries in Nelson has become the latest nursery to join the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) and is now selling KPCS certified kiwifruit plants.

Purchasing certified kiwifruit plants mean growers have assurance they are investing in the best start for their plants.

To date, four nurseries located in Kerikeri, Gisborne, Motueka and Nelson, have joined the KPCS. These nurseries are identified on the KVH nursery list here.

Other nurseries have expressed strong interest in joining the scheme and are currently documenting how their operation addresses biosecurity risks, as required under the KPCS.

All nurseries selling and dispatching kiwifruit plants must be registered with KVH or be part of the KPCS.

From 1 October 2016, all kiwifruit plants for sale and distribution must be KPCS certified.

For more information, visit www.kvh.org.nz/kpcs.

Karyn Lowry, KVH Operations

 

R&D News
30 April 2015
Bi-monthly R&D update report: February/March update
30 April 2015
This bi-monthly report provides information about the progress over February and March 2015 for the Psa R&D programme. The following projects are summarised in the report: Elicitor potted...
Bi-monthly R&D update report: February/March update
30 April 2015

This bi-monthly report provides information about the progress over February and March 2015 for the Psa R&D programme. The following projects are summarised in the report:

  • Elicitor potted plant trial
  • Glasshouse trials
  • Green bud rot trial
  • Autumn spraying for protection from Psa (Gold kiwifruit)
  • Bud rot in Hayward and Green14

Click here to read the report.

Lara Harrison, KVH Communications

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz