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Biosecurity News
15 December 2016
You can help promote BMSB biocontrol
15 December 2016
If T. japonicas was to be imported to help combat an arrival of BMSB, it is important to understand potential impacts to New Zealand’s current shield bug population.   Plant and Food...
You can help promote BMSB biocontrol
15 December 2016
If T. japonicas was to be imported to help combat an arrival of BMSB, it is important to understand potential impacts to New Zealand’s current shield bug population.
 
Plant and Food Research need a supply of shield bugs to test whether T. japonicus parasitises them as well as BMSB. You can help! If you detect any of the following (pictured right):
·        Brown Shield Bug
·        Glossy Shield Bug
·        Spiny Shield Bug
 
If you detect any of these bugs, please courier them to:
Sophie Hunt
c/o Plant & Food Research
120 Mt Albert Road
Mt Albert
Auckland 1025
 
Biosecurity News
12 December 2016
Proactively discussing biocontrol
12 December 2016
Chief Executive Barry O'Neil last week attended a workshop hosted by NZ Wine Growers, where Dr Mark Hoddle from the University of Southern California presented on proactive biocontrol.   Dr...
Proactively discussing biocontrol
12 December 2016
Chief Executive Barry O'Neil last week attended a workshop hosted by NZ Wine Growers, where Dr Mark Hoddle from the University of Southern California presented on proactive biocontrol.
 
Dr Hoddle’s presentation discussed benefits of the many biocontrols available, including for the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).  He also demonstrated the remarkable control effect from introducing a biocontrol in Tahiti for Glassy Wing Sharp Shooter (GWSS), where use of the biocontrol wasp essentially wiped out GWSS over seven months. 
 
KVH is part of an industry steering group which aims to prepare an application to release this wasp should BMSB arrive in New Zealand.
 
Click here to view the full presentation.

 

 

 

Grower News
1 December 2016
Difficult weather conditions continue
1 December 2016
Orchards in the Bay of Plenty and other regions have continued to be battered by strong winds over the past fortnight with cane loss and severe leaf damage, particularly in high altitude and/or wind...
Difficult weather conditions continue
1 December 2016

Orchards in the Bay of Plenty and other regions have continued to be battered by strong winds over the past fortnight with cane loss and severe leaf damage, particularly in high altitude and/or wind exposed Hayward canopies. Elevated levels of Psa leaf spot and flower-bud infection are also being seen on these orchards as pollination continues. Leaf spotting has also been reported on a few Gold3 blocks. 

The increase in Psa symptoms is unsurprising given the high level of canopy damage, as wounds have created multiple access points for Psa. 
 
Growers are recommended to reapply copper cover as soon as pollination is complete to manage Psa inoculum levels and should consider additional coppers prior to periods of high risk weather throughout the balance of the growing season. 
 
Typically, Psa risk reduces significantly as temperatures rise to 20 degrees or above; however, growers with moderate or severe leaf spot are reminded that these spots continue to be a potential inoculum source when weather conditions favour Psa. 
 
Prune males during dry periods and follow up with protective sprays as soon as practicable to protect pruning wounds and recovering leaf canopy.
 
Foliars to support leaf and vine recovery should be tailored to individual orchard needs. Maintain a five to seven-day gap between applications of foliars and copper to minimise the risk of phytotoxicity to leaves and fruit. Do not apply sprays in poor drying conditions or high humidity as risk of fruit staining increases. Be aware of fruit sensitive periods
 
Gold skin sensitivity commences around 21 days after fruit set with risk increasing between 28 and 42 days and reducing again between 42 and 80 days. For Hayward, 14 to 35 days after fruit set is considered a high-risk period. If needed, protective sprays may be applied but take extra caution to ensure excellent spray conditions.
 
Protective Psa programs should be continued on all sites with high levels of wind damage and leaf spot, irrespective of remaining fruit numbers. Failure to maintain a strong program risks inoculum build-up within the orchard and may also add risk to neighbouring orchards.
 
Company Notices
1 December 2016
Protecting to Grow New Zealand
1 December 2016
MPI and GIA partners hosted the Protecting to Grow New Zealand Biosecurity Forum last week, which included national and international experts speaking about the future of biosecurity in New Zealand....
Protecting to Grow New Zealand
1 December 2016

MPI and GIA partners hosted the Protecting to Grow New Zealand Biosecurity Forum last week, which included national and international experts speaking about the future of biosecurity in New Zealand. Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy also launched the Biosecurity 2025 Direction Statement. The second day of the forum provided opportunity for discussion and contribution through workshops focused on each of the five key strategic directions.  

 
Chief Executive Barry O’Neil and Biosecurity Programmes Manager Andrew Harrison attended the forum and contributed significantly to the workshops.
 
Click here to read the Biosecurity 2025 Direction Statement.
 
Grower News
1 December 2016
Lab testing: hours over Christmas
1 December 2016
Hill Laboratories will receive samples up to Friday 16 December 2016. Any samples received on or before this date should have results reported prior to Christmas.   The start-up date for the...
Lab testing: hours over Christmas
1 December 2016

Hill Laboratories will receive samples up to Friday 16 December 2016. Any samples received on or before this date should have results reported prior to Christmas.

 
The start-up date for the New Year will be Monday 9 January 2017.
 
Only KVH pre-arranged urgent testing will be accepted between these dates. Please contact Karyn Lowry on 027 227 1157 If urgent Psa testing is required between 19 December and 6 January. Photos of symptoms will be required. We anticipate these will only be from areas currently free of Psa (i.e. South Island).
 
Grower News
1 December 2016
New Risk Model training videos
1 December 2016
HortPlus NZ and KVH have recently produced a suite of online training videos, designed to assist with using the Psa Risk Model and associated weather tools.  Click here to watch the videos and...
New Risk Model training videos
1 December 2016

HortPlus NZ and KVH have recently produced a suite of online training videos, designed to assist with using the Psa Risk Model and associated weather tools. 

Click here to watch the videos and learn more about the Risk Model.  
 
R&D News
30 November 2016
PhD student probes Psa research
30 November 2016
Over the past three months, KVH has hosted British PhD student, Stuart Woodcock (pictured) from the John Innes Centre in England. Stuart has been in New Zealand undertaking a review of the research...
PhD student probes Psa research
30 November 2016

Over the past three months, KVH has hosted British PhD student, Stuart Woodcock (pictured) from the John Innes Centre in England. Stuart has been in New Zealand undertaking a review of the research and development surrounding Psa during an internship as part of his PhD, which involves researching pseudomonas bacteria, particularly Psa and its ability to cause infection within plants.   

Psa has been estimated to have cost over $1 billion to the New Zealand kiwifruit industry since 2010. Although productivity has recovered, Psa remains a prevalent threat as the majority of orchards harbour the bacteria, with only one kiwifruit growing region has yet to exhibit infection. 
 
More recently, the use of other biological organisms to control Psa have also been trialled and included into a control programme. All these products are effective to various extents, but it has been found that some samples of Psa has developed low level resistance to some of the controls, which could potentially make them ineffective.
 
Working with representatives from KVH, Zespri, Plant and Food Research and growers, Stuart has reviewed past and ongoing research addressing the threat of Psa to New Zealand kiwifruit. He has also identified areas where research needs to be strengthened and highlighted new and novel areas which may be beneficial in combatting Psa.
 
Stuart said his time in New Zealand has proven to be extremely valuable in his studies and continual learning development.
 
“It has been great to get out and about in various parts of the country to see how orchards are managing Psa and talking to orchardists about their control methods,” he said.
 
“I’ve been working closely with KVH and Zespri over the past few months to really get into the complexities of Psa and I hope my review will be useful in the continued management of this invasive infection.”
 
KVH Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, said he was looking forward to further investigating the findings of the review.
 
“It has been fantastic to have someone with Stuart’s depth of knowledge working with us at KVH. He has identified some key areas of past research which can look to be strengthened in time and also highlighted some innovative ways which could potentially help with the ongoing Psa management.”
 
“Stuart’s review is part of the continuing research and development KVH delivers annually in collaboration with Zespri,” he said.
 
 
Biosecurity News
28 November 2016
Fruit fly stopped at the border
28 November 2016
Four fruit fly larvae were intercepted by MPI at Wellington Airport earlier this month.   The larvae were discovered through an MPI x-ray machine in an undeclared mandarin carried by an...
Fruit fly stopped at the border
28 November 2016

Four fruit fly larvae were intercepted by MPI at Wellington Airport earlier this month.

 
The larvae were discovered through an MPI x-ray machine in an undeclared mandarin carried by an Australian passenger arriving from Melbourne. They have since been confirmed as Queensland fruit fly – regarded as one of the worst horticultural pests in the world. Click here to read the full story.
 
Biosecurity News
17 November 2016
Biosecurity Week
17 November 2016
Biosecurity Week is kicking off next week with a public day at the Port of Tauranga in Mount Maunganui on Monday 21 November, 1 - 3pm.    The event marks the start of Biosecurity Week (21...
Biosecurity Week
17 November 2016
Biosecurity Week is kicking off next week with a public day at the Port of Tauranga in Mount Maunganui on Monday 21 November, 1 - 3pm. 
 
The event marks the start of Biosecurity Week (21 – 25 November) in the Bay of Plenty and coincides with the first overnight cruise ship stay for the season. This is also the start of the high-risk season for pests entering New Zealand.
 
Particularly for residents that live adjacent to an international port, like those in Mount Maunganui, we ask that residents keep a watchful eye out for damaging pests such as the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug and Red Imported Fire Ant. 
 
The public day will allow residents to learn about the impacts of invasive pests on us all. The MPI biosecurity beagle dog will also be on hand to demonstrate the fantastic work they do.
 
Effective biosecurity awareness is critical to the Bay of Plenty region. A major biosecurity incursion puts at risk New Zealanders livelihoods, lifestyles and environment, as well as having major impacts on our orchards, forests and farms and the thousands of people they employ.
 
The awareness week will also see a range of activities happening at the Port of Tauranga involving Port personnel, plus industry partner visits to transitional and post-harvest facilities, to provide biosecurity collateral and raise understanding amongst industry workers.
 
Biosecurity Week is part of the biosecurity excellence partnership between Port of Tauranga, Ministry for Primary Industries, Kiwifruit Vine Health, NZ Avocado, Dairy NZ, Forestry Owners Association, NZ Customs and Bay of Plenty Regional Council.  The partnership aims to build a port community committed to biosecurity excellence, which includes local residents as well as those working within the port.
 
Grower News
17 November 2016
Whangarei Monitoring
17 November 2016
The first positive orchard in the Whangarei region was confirmed in September 2015. A controlled area was put in place around the positive orchard, which restricted movement of risk material. A...
Whangarei Monitoring
17 November 2016
The first positive orchard in the Whangarei region was confirmed in September 2015. A controlled area was put in place around the positive orchard, which restricted movement of risk material. A second orchard was found to be positive on 7 October 2016 within the controlled area. KVH last week carried out a round of monitoring in a selection of orchards in the immediate area. 
 
Ten orchards were selected including a local market planting. The total area monitored was 21.80ha. Three of the orchards still had 16A plantings – the others were G3 and Hayward.
 
Fruit had set in the 16A orchards, with flowering well underway in the G3 and bees in the orchards. Hayward flowering appeared to be a little while off with buds mostly quite tight.
 
Samples were taken from five orchards where some cane dieback was observed – these samples were returned Psa Not Detected.
 
Growers in the region have been monitoring fortnightly throughout spring, with the final round completed on 7 November. They are to be commended for their efforts and encouraged to keep up regular monitoring to enable any Psa symptoms to be identified early and appropriate action taken.
 
Grower News
17 November 2016
Mandatory Monitoring: Results Overdue
17 November 2016
  This year all Not Detected orchards in all regions were required to monitor and report to KVH that they were still Not Detected by 31st October 2016. This is regardless of whether orchards...
Mandatory Monitoring: Results Overdue
17 November 2016
 
This year all Not Detected orchards in all regions were required to monitor and report to KVH that they were still Not Detected by 31st October 2016. This is regardless of whether orchards are producing or not. In some regions, there are very few Not Detected orchards.
 
The table above records the percentage of Not Detected orchards in each region which have not yet reported to KVH.

If you were previously Not Detected but now have Psa symptoms, please contact KVH on 0800 665 825 so we can update our records. If you are unsure of your current status, please check with KVH.
 
NB: It is a requirement under the NPMP to report to KVH within 48 hours of seeing Psa symptoms.
 
Grower News
17 November 2016
Remove privet to improve kiwifruit pollination
17 November 2016
Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense), also known as hedge privet, is now beginning to flower prolifically.   It is another invasive weed often found in orchard shelter belts, or any neglected...
Remove privet to improve kiwifruit pollination
17 November 2016
Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense), also known as hedge privet, is now beginning to flower prolifically.   It is another invasive weed often found in orchard shelter belts, or any neglected corner of the property.
 
Bees will be attracted to the scented privet in preference to Hayward kiwifruit flowers, so remove privet now to improve kiwifruit pollination! 
 
Privet seed is spread by birds feeding on the high number of small, black fruits in autumn and winter.  Privet has a high germination rate and establishes as an innocuous plant hidden within shelter belts or orchard margins.  It is now easily identified while flowering.
 
Any orchard managers, contractors or staff who suffer allergies or asthma triggered by privet, should not handle the plant.  Privet control, especially during flowering, must be undertaken by people whose health is not adversely affected. Contact your doctor or the Poisons Centre for advice about privet allergies. Poisons Centre information can be found at www.poisons.co.nz
 
Control privet by cutting off at stump level (i.e. no higher than ankle height) and applying one part Glyphosate to five parts water to the top and sides of the cut stump.  Chainsaw cuts around the base of the stump can assist herbicide penetration.
 
Organic properties can remove mature privet shrubs with a tractor and snig chain, or dig the entire plant from the ground.  Privet stumps will regrow if not entirely removed or killed with herbicide.  Better practice still, is to remove privet while at the seedling stage – so learn how to identify seedling Chinese privet and pull seedlings out while undertaking shelter belt maintenance. 
 
As always, follow all health and safety requirements when operating machinery, tools or handling plants like privet which may aggravate asthma or allergies.
 

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz