Search Site

Newsroom

Print these articles
Company Notices
19 April 2018
KVH Associate Director vacancy
19 April 2018
KVH has an exciting development opportunity for a future leader within the kiwifruit industry.  We are seeking an upcoming leader to join the Kiwifruit Vine Health Incorporated Board of...
KVH Associate Director vacancy
19 April 2018

KVH has an exciting development opportunity for a future leader within the kiwifruit industry. 

We are seeking an upcoming leader to join the Kiwifruit Vine Health Incorporated Board of Directors as an Associate Director. 

This opportunity will expose the successful applicant to gain experience in governance, leadership and strategy while bringing his/her own industry knowledge and experience to the KVH Board table.   

The Associate Director will also have the opportunity to be mentored by an industry leader and a contribution from KVH towards their governance training. 

This is a non-voting role however the Board seeks full participation in meetings and will welcome constructive contributions from the Associate Director in the workings of the Board. 

For further information or a copy of the position description please contact Jacqui Craig at KVH on 0800 665 825. 

Please send your current CV and application letter to Jacqui by email at
jacqui.craig@kvh.org.nz. Applications close Friday 4 May 2018.

Biosecurity News
19 April 2018
New approach to manage myrtle rust
19 April 2018
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and the Department of Conservation (DOC) say the fight against myrtle rust is changing gear, given the prevalence of the disease across susceptible parts of...
New approach to manage myrtle rust
19 April 2018

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and the Department of Conservation (DOC) say the fight against myrtle rust is changing gear, given the prevalence of the disease across susceptible parts of New Zealand.

Response activities will now move from intensive surveillance and the removal and destruction of host plants, to managing the disease over the long term.

Efforts will now be placed on a science programme designed to lift understanding around myrtle rust such as ways to treat it, resistance and susceptibility, and to improve seed banking collection. A second key focus is on working with communities across New Zealand to support regional efforts to combat the disease.

As of last Friday, 582 properties are known to have been infected by the fungal disease since it was first detected on mainland New Zealand in mid-May 2017. Since then, more than 5000 myrtle plants have been securely removed and destroyed, and more than 95,000 myrtle plants inspected.

The latest update from MPI confirms the disease has been found on 134 properties in the Bay of Plenty, 11 of which are new sites from within the last fortnight.

Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit or kiwifruit vines, growers are encouraged to continue to report any possible cases they suspect on other plants in their orchards or in their gardens to the MPI biosecurity hotline on 0800 80 99 66. This is so that the spread of myrtle rust can be tracked, and officials can better understand what its long-term impacts might be.

Read more about the new long-term approach to myrtle rust here.

Biosecurity News
19 April 2018
In the news this week
19 April 2018
Biosecurity is being placed at the centre of operations at the Port of Tauranga - Rural Delivery on TVNZ. Watch the feature on the ‘Port of Excellence’ initiative led by the port, the...
In the news this week
19 April 2018

Biosecurity is being placed at the centre of operations at the Port of Tauranga - Rural Delivery on TVNZ.

Watch the feature on the ‘Port of Excellence’ initiative led by the port, the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), and KVH. Biosecurity has been integrated into strategic and day-to-day operations and several projects are underway to build more awareness amongst those who work on and around the port.

Meet New Zealand’s only stink bug dog – NZ Herald.

Read about Georgie, the nation’s first and only Detector Dog dedicated to hunting out the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). Georgie and the team at the Auckland port are responsible for inspecting and clearing goods and vessels, including those recently turned away because stink bugs were found onboard.

Biosecurity News
19 April 2018
Check imports and report the unusual
19 April 2018
KVH is aware of people waiting for or recently receiving cars that were shipped to New Zealand on the vessels recently detected with Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and Yellow Spotted Stink Bug...
Check imports and report the unusual
19 April 2018

KVH is aware of people waiting for or recently receiving cars that were shipped to New Zealand on the vessels recently detected with Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and Yellow Spotted Stink Bug (YSSB).

The vessels have been treated and the heightened Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI)-enforced fumigation process will be more effective.

However, there is never zero risk and we ask all private and commercial machinery importers and transitional facilities to carefully inspect machinery at all stages of the de-vanning process – especially if the goods are from known BMSB-infected countries and going on to an orchard.

The more eyes on the lookout for anything unusual, the better.

Importers should:
• be aware of the risk around BMSB;
• have BMSB identification information on-hand;
• inspect the vehicle, especially small spaces such as around the engine bay, battery, door and boot linings, etc;
• catch, snap and report anything unusual. If an insect is found immediately shut and contain the vehicle (e.g. within a shut garage). Phone the MPI biosecurity hotline on 0800 80 99 66. Orchardists and machinery dealers are asked to inform KVH of any detections.

More information about BMSB, including what to look out for and how to identify suspected finds is available on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
19 April 2018
Unwanted!
19 April 2018
Each month we profile one of the 12 most unwanted pests featured on our ‘Port of Tauranga – committed to biosecurity excellence’ calendar. Any of these could potentially enter our...
Unwanted!
19 April 2018

Each month we profile one of the 12 most unwanted pests featured on our ‘Port of Tauranga – committed to biosecurity excellence’ calendar. Any of these could potentially enter our borders and have a major impact on local community and businesses, the kiwifruit industry or other local growers.

This month the focus is on bark beetles, a significant forestry pest. Many species can attack and kill healthy trees, especially the species pictured, which is considered the most serious insect pest of coniferous trees in the Northern Hemisphere.



Some closely related species of bark beetles have caused impacts to kiwifruit in Turkey where the beetles often attack vines that are already weakened by disease, drought, physical and frost damage.  They are highly invasive and mine the inner bark on twigs, branches, or trunks of vines. One species also attacks fruit and causes dropping.

In Turkey they have found that agricultural best practices to grow healthy kiwifruit are essential to control bark beetles. They’ve also used red sticky traps with bottles containing alcohol attractant for monitoring and mass trapping bark beetles, which generally spread from neighbouring hazelnut orchards.

Everyone can play a part in keeping unwanted pests and diseases out of New Zealand. If you come across anything unusual catch it, take a photo, and report it to the biosecurity hotline on 0800 80 99 66.

Company Notices
19 April 2018
New Chair for KVH Board
19 April 2018
KVH has elected a new Board Chair, Dr David Tanner. David has been a Director on the KVH Board since September 2016 and was elected Chair at the March Board meeting after Adrian Gault announced...
New Chair for KVH Board
19 April 2018

KVH has elected a new Board Chair, Dr David Tanner.

David has been a Director on the KVH Board since September 2016 and was elected Chair at the March Board meeting after Adrian Gault announced he had decided to stand down from the role so he could focus on his business ventures, including his own kiwifruit orchard.

Many growers know Adrian well and will have seen him at various roadshows over the years - we’re sure you join KVH in thanking him for his commitment during his time as Chair.

With a wealth of experience in the kiwifruit industry, David brings to the role a career steeped in horticultural science and innovation leadership.  Growers will recall he also spent eight years with Zespri as General Manager Science and Innovation, responsible for the innovation team and their investment in research and development.

When Psa struck he was able to dedicate two and half years to leading the science and technical response to the disease, an experience that gave him a comprehensive understanding of Psa and the risk of any other biosecurity event.

Aside from his governance roles with KVH and national education trust House of Science New Zealand, David sits on, or chairs, a number of other food industry boards. Outside of this, David and his business partner are kept busy running their horticultural innovation company, Start Afresh Ltd.

Last but not least, he is of course a grower himself and together with other partners owns green and gold orchards in Katikati and Te Puke.

The KVH Board and team welcome David to his new role.

Media Releases
11 April 2018
Tiny wasp to combat stink bug
11 April 2018
Horticultural industry groups along with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) are working together to use a tiny parasitoid wasp to combat the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). The...
Tiny wasp to combat stink bug
11 April 2018

Horticultural industry groups along with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) are working together to use a tiny parasitoid wasp to combat the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB).

The BMSB Council (a partnership between horticultural industry groups and MPI, under GIA) has made an application to the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) seeking approval to release the Samurai Wasp (Trissolcus japonicus) as a biocontrol agent against BMSB, but only if an incursion is found in New Zealand.

BMSB Council Chair Alan Pollard says if a BMSB incursion is found here, the consequences would be disastrous for New Zealand's horticulture industries and everyday New Zealanders.  

“The stink bug is one of the biggest biosecurity threats we face, and it could cause hundreds of millions of dollars of losses. The wasp provides an opportunity to be proactive in our approach and gives us another tool we can use to control the stink bug,” said Mr Pollard.

“It feeds on over 300 plant species and can multiply and get to very high population numbers rapidly, destroying crops and gardens and even get into your home. In the USA and Europe where the invasive pest has become established, it has caused severe damage to the horticulture industries. It’s also invaded residents’ homes and become a real social nuisance.”

“We’ve also seen growers overseas use high levels of insecticides as the primary way to control the stink bug. We believe the wasp will provide a targeted and self-sustaining control tool and provides growers with another option other than increasing insecticide sprays,” says Mr Pollard.

The wasp does not sting and is harmless to humans but is a natural enemy of the stink bug. The female wasp lays her eggs inside the stink bugs eggs, killing the stink bug in the process. Studies overseas have shown the wasp can destroy over 70 percent of the eggs in a stink bug egg mass.

A NZIER report, commissioned by the Samurai Wasp Steering Group, has estimated that gross domestic product would fall by between $1.8 billion and $3.6b by 2038 if BMSB became established. It also estimated the horticulture export value could fall by between $2b and $4.2b.

Public submissions are now open until 5pm, Thursday, 24 May 2018. Interested parties are encouraged to make a submission on the EPA website.


For more information contact:

Alan Pollard
GIA BMSB Council Chair
Ph: 021 576 109
Email: alan@applesandpears.nz

About the BMSB Council

The BMSB Council is a partnership under GIA between industry and government and is the responsible for BMSB readiness and response. The Council consists of member organisations (Kiwifruit Vine Health, Ministry for Primary Industries, New Zealand Avocado, New Zealand Apples & Pears, New Zealand Winegrowers, Tomatoes New Zealand, Vegetables New Zealand) and observers (Foundation for Arable Research, Horticulture New Zealand, New Zealand Plant Producers Inc., Process Vegetables New Zealand and Summerfruit New Zealand).


About the Government Industry Agreement (GIA)

GIA operates as a partnership between industry groups and Government to manage pests and diseases that could badly damage New Zealand's primary industries, our economy, and our environment. It aims to improve biosecurity outcomes and give everyone the confidence that the best decisions are being made to manage and mitigate biosecurity risks. For more information, visit www.gia.org.nz.

 

Biosecurity News
5 April 2018
Fruit fly risk not going away
5 April 2018
The risk of one of our most unwanted pests, the fruit fly, is still top-of-mind with recent finds of flies in fruit disposed of at our airport ‘declare or dispose’ bins, and incursions...
Fruit fly risk not going away
5 April 2018

The risk of one of our most unwanted pests, the fruit fly, is still top-of-mind with recent finds of flies in fruit disposed of at our airport ‘declare or dispose’ bins, and incursions into previously pest-free areas of Australia.

Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF) control, surveillance and eradication activities continue on Tasmania, including responding to another single larva find in grapefruit in a supermarket the weekend before last. Biosecurity Tasmania has more than 100 staff working alongside stakeholders and industry representatives implementing a range of actions including baiting, spraying, trapping, inspecting, monitoring and planning. 

South Australia has also been affected. They are managing an outbreak of Mediterranean Fruit Fly as well as QFF outbreaks in Adelaide, and an adult QFF found in a surveillance trap in Fremantle, Perth, sparked an eradication programme to prevent any further spread. Although no further flies have been found officials say movement restrictions will remain in place until at least 18 April.

As part of control efforts in Adelaide two million sterile fruit flies have been airdropped over parts of the city in a bid to eradicate female flies – watch the video showing them being dropped out of a plane.

In the future, it’s expected that Australia will use mass release of sterile fruit flies to help with small outbreaks.  Plant & Food Research were granted permission in mid-2015 to import sterile flies into a New Zealand containment facility to develop new attractants for female and male flies. This work is part of a collaborative approach with Australian organisations and is supported by KVH as an integral part of our readiness activities.

KVH is closely following the detections and responses in Australia to make sure we monitor any change in risk to New Zealand.

The high-risk entry period for fruit flies runs through to June. Be vigilant and keep watch. While New Zealand does have a comprehensive surveillance programme in place for fruit fly, additional vigilance from growers adds another layer of protection. Read more about how to identify fruit flies on the KVH website.

Biosecurity News
5 April 2018
Support for airline food restrictions
5 April 2018
KVH is supporting Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) considerations to make changes to the amount of food air passengers can bring into New Zealand. Due to the sheer volume of food being...
Support for airline food restrictions
5 April 2018

KVH is supporting Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) considerations to make changes to the amount of food air passengers can bring into New Zealand.

Due to the sheer volume of food being carried by passengers (sometimes longer-term visitors arrive with suitcase loads), border staff are spending hours not only considering biosecurity risk items but also identifying and clearing goods that don’t pose any threat.  KVH’s view is that this is not sustainable and that a completely new approach should be looked at to better manage the risk posed by food carried by an increasing number of international passengers arriving at our airports every day. 

Options KVH supports are limiting the amount of food that passengers can arrive with (e.g. less than 1kg), or alternatively charging the passenger for the time and costs involved in clearing the food.

MPI is currently discussing the matter with airline representative groups who are keen to work together to make improvements to the current system.

KVH will keep growers updated on any developments in this area. 

Grower News
5 April 2018
Biosecurity 2025: making it happen
5 April 2018
Growers can subscribe to the Biosecurity 2025 newsletter to learn all about what’s happening to implement the national biosecurity strategy. The latest edition profiles individuals and...
Biosecurity 2025: making it happen
5 April 2018

Growers can subscribe to the Biosecurity 2025 newsletter to learn all about what’s happening to implement the national biosecurity strategy.

The latest edition profiles individuals and community groups who are making a difference through their education efforts to keep out unwanted pests and diseases and includes contributions from KVH about our work building awareness in schools.

KVH and others from the kiwifruit industry took part in the development of the Biosecurity 2025 strategy and we continue to be involved through working groups and planning teams. We encourage you to subscribe to the regular updates and share your ideas so that together – within our industry and communities – we help pull together an engaged team of 4.7 million people actively taking part in managing New Zealand’s biosecurity risk.
 

Protocols & Movement Controls
5 April 2018
North-West Auckland now a Psa Recovery region
5 April 2018
Following the identification of additional Psa positive orchards and a grower meeting to discuss regional classification, North-West Auckland has moved from a Containment region to a Recovery region...
North-West Auckland now a Psa Recovery region
5 April 2018

Following the identification of additional Psa positive orchards and a grower meeting to discuss regional classification, North-West Auckland has moved from a Containment region to a Recovery region under the National Pest Management Plan (NPMP).

The change, which came into effect from 1 April 2018, was approved by the KVH Board at their March meeting.

All New Zealand kiwifruit-growing regions are classified as Exclusion, Containment or Recovery, based on the level of Psa infection.  A Recovery region is a region already widespread with the disease.

More information on regional classifications, including maps, is available on the KVH website.
 

Biosecurity News
5 April 2018
Protecting orchards from Psa through autumn
5 April 2018
Autumn is a high-risk period for Psa as cooler, wetter weather conditions favour multiplication and spread of disease. The Psa Risk Model shows heightened Psa risk from early next week for most...
Protecting orchards from Psa through autumn
5 April 2018

Autumn is a high-risk period for Psa as cooler, wetter weather conditions favour multiplication and spread of disease.

The Psa Risk Model shows heightened Psa risk from early next week for most growing regions, with moderate risk indicated for the Waikato areas – see the Karapiro weather station image below. This change in risk is normal as night temperatures begin to drop and autumn rain fronts move across the country.



Growers should step up protection in line with these seasonal changes and individual orchard risk. Ensure young replacement plants and development blocks are protected with summer rate copper as young plants are more vulnerable to Psa infection. Also apply copper to protect strung canes brought down through autumn to ensure wounds are covered before high-risk weather occurs.  For those harvesting later in the season, applying a copper spray when weather and ground conditions allow will begin to rebuild protective cover across vines. A reminder that leaf spots can provide a source of inoculum so should be considered when making decisions on spray applications.

Immediately following harvest, growers should be getting copper spray programmes underway to help prevent Psa entering their vines through harvest wounds and leaf scars.

Incorporation of Actigard into a post-harvest programme will reduce the likelihood of disease symptoms appearing the following spring. Actigard can be tank mixed with copper and is most effective when applied to leaves that are still in good condition. Extreme care must be taken to avoid spray drift onto unharvested blocks. After spraying Actigard ensure that spray tanks, lines and nozzles are cleaned thoroughly before spraying other products on unharvested fruit.

For more information, refer to KVH's Psa Best Practice Guide and the latest Actigard technote.

Any growers concerned they may not be achieving the expected levels of Psa control from copper applications at label rates should contact KVH on 0800 665 825 or email info@kvh.org.nz.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz