Search Site

Newsroom

Print these articles
Grower News
19 May 2016
KVH Board appoints Independent Director
19 May 2016
The KVH Board is pleased to advise Graeme Marshall has been appointed as Independent Director, subject to KVH members approving Graeme’s formal appointment at the KVH AGM on 31 August. In the...
KVH Board appoints Independent Director
19 May 2016

The KVH Board is pleased to advise Graeme Marshall has been appointed as Independent Director, subject to KVH members approving Graeme’s formal appointment at the KVH AGM on 31 August. In the interim, Graeme will be attending KVH Board meetings as an observer.

Graeme’s appointment follows Peter Silcock’s resignation as Independent Director earlier this year.

Graeme has extensive experience in biosecurity and governance roles. He is Chairman of the Biosecurity Ministerial Advisory Committee (BMAC), which provides advice to the Minister for Primary Industries on the effectiveness of NZ’s biosecurity system.

Graeme also spent 16 Years at Port of Tauranga where he held the role of Commercial Manager, responsible for the operations and business development of the Port.

KVH is very pleased to have someone of Graeme’s calibre for this specialised role and looks forward to his input and expertise at future Board meetings.
 

Grower News
19 May 2016
Autumn brings reports of Psa-V
19 May 2016
With autumn weather firmly settled in, reports of Psa-V symptoms are on the rise in some orchards. Mostly from sites where the disease has been challenging in the past. Autumn observations: ...
Autumn brings reports of Psa-V
19 May 2016

With autumn weather firmly settled in, reports of Psa-V symptoms are on the rise in some orchards. Mostly from sites where the disease has been challenging in the past.

Autumn observations:

  • Young Gold3 scions girdled in early March were showing exudate at the girdle points. Infection in the trunks and leaders were also common in these plants.
  • Exudate from trunk lenticels on young scions.
  • A Gold3 block, which recovered strongly after ongoing spring cut-out of Psa-V, showed indications of infection beginning to move back through some plants. Symptoms included dieback from leader cut points, dehydrated strung laterals and blackened canes.
  • New spotting was seen on Bruno suckers and/or young plants, particularly where a comprehensive spray programme had not been maintained.
  • On some Gold3 blocks, cane die-back and fruit shrivel was seen during harvest.

Recommendations:

  • Monitor orchard areas where Psa-V infection has been present in the past and remove infected material as soon as possible.  Removal and disposal of infected material outside the production area remains a key tool in Psa-V management and a key component of the industry management strategy to minimise the build-up and spread of any resistant Psa strains that may have developed.
  • Maintain excellent tool hygiene and protect pruning cuts to avoid infection transfer.
  • Trim high male growth, particularly in sites prone to frost. Warm temperatures have led to growth flushes, creating tissue that will be vulnerable to frost damage and Psa-V infection when temperatures turn colder.

Click here for images of Psa symptoms in girdled Gold3
Click here for images of Psa symptoms in young Gold3 canopy
Click here for images of Psa symptoms in young blocks

Biosecurity News
19 May 2016
KVH signs Operational Agreement for fruit flies
19 May 2016
On 9 May 2016 Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) signed the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies on behalf of the kiwifruit industry—a significant milestone to further improve biosecurity...
KVH signs Operational Agreement for fruit flies
19 May 2016

On 9 May 2016 Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) signed the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies on behalf of the kiwifruit industry—a significant milestone to further improve biosecurity readiness and response activities for fruit flies and the first such agreement under the Government Industry Agreements (GIA) partnership.

GIA partners, The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), Pipfruit NZ, NZ Citrus Growers and NZ Avocados are also signatories of the OA.

The OA sets out the operational requirements for readiness and response activities for fruit flies and importantly, enables joint decision making and also clarifies cost-sharing arrangements between government and affected industries.

Under the OA, KVH and other parties will agree a work plan to improve readiness and response, including how we can detect fruit flies earlier and also reducing costs without reducing effectiveness.

Cost-sharing for fruit fly readiness and response activities commences when the OA comes into full effect in 2017. Once fully implemented, the Government will pay the first 20% of total costs on behalf of risk exacerbators. The remaining costs will then be shared by government and benefiting industries as follows:

  • 70% Govt: 30% Industry for readiness/surveillance (current annual costs are around $1.85m)
  • 70% Govt: 30% Industry for level 1 response (i.e. Whangarei response)
  • 80% Govt: 20% Industry for level 2 response (i.e. Grey Lynn response)
  • 90% Govt: 10% Industry for level 3 response (larger response where alternative control methods may be required.

The industry portion will then be divided among all benefiting industries based on industry value. For a fruit fly incursion, the kiwifruit industry currently represents about 48.5% of the value of all industries potentially affected by this organism, and therefore would pick up 48.5% of the total industry share.

Costs are limited by a fiscal cap which equates to about $3.12m for the collective industry share. The existing kiwifruit biosecurity levy paid by growers is sufficient to cover kiwifruit industry costs under the OA.

Industries that benefit from a response but haven’t signed up to GIA or the OA will still have to pay their share and the government will seek to recover costs from 1 July 2017.
 

Grower News
19 May 2016
KVH hosts MPI staff
19 May 2016
Last week KVH hosted twenty-three visitors from MPI’s surveillance and incursion investigation teams from Wellington. The purpose of the visit was for MPI staff who are directly involved in...
KVH hosts MPI staff
19 May 2016

Last week KVH hosted twenty-three visitors from MPI’s surveillance and incursion investigation teams from Wellington. The purpose of the visit was for MPI staff who are directly involved in incursion responses to gain both a better understanding of the kiwifruit industry and an overview of the work KVH is doing around biosecurity.

The group visited Trevelyan’s Pack and Cool to observe packing and coolstore operations; and Plant and Food Research where they were updated on kiwifruit research by Dr Stuart Kay.

After a busy morning in Te Puke they were presented with Zespri’s industry overview and future strategy by Carol Ward.

KVH highlighted its ongoing biosecurity initiatives and discussed partnerships with the regional councils, ports, freight and logistics sectors to raise biosecurity awareness amongst these sectors.

The tour also provided a good opportunity to discuss future possibilities about how industry and MPI can work together under GIA on biosecurity challenges.
 

Biosecurity News
9 May 2016
Kiwifruit industry signs Operational Agreement for Fruit Flies
9 May 2016
GIA Secretariat Press Release: GIA partnership welcomes agreement for fruit flies Fruit Fly Council Press Release: Industry partnership plan developed for fruit fly threat ...
Biosecurity News
5 May 2016
Invasive Alligator weed found in Opotiki orchard
5 May 2016
Alligator weed, an eradication category pest in the Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s pest management plan, has been found in an Opotiki kiwifruit orchard.   The invasive weed (pictured),...
Invasive Alligator weed found in Opotiki orchard
5 May 2016
Alligator weed, an eradication category pest in the Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s pest management plan, has been found in an Opotiki kiwifruit orchard.
 
The invasive weed (pictured), is well established in the Northland area and parts of the Waikato, but is rare or not present elsewhere.  Research in Italy claims Psa can colonise and survive on a group of weed species including alligator weed. KVH is following up on this.
 
It was detected by a vigilant AgFirst employee collecting kiwifruit samples for maturity testing.  
 
The Bay of Plenty Regional Council will manage and fund an eradication programme.
 
Growers in the Opotiki area are asked to look out for the weed, which is fast-growing and would compete with kiwifruit for nutrients in the orchard. 
 
Alligator weed is a persistent aquatic and land weed with dark-green waxy leaves in opposite pairs. Stems are hollow and often reddish in colour. White clover-like flowers, 1-2 cm in diameter, appear during summer and autumn.  
 
Although alligator weed does not produce viable seed in New Zealand it can readily spread through stem fragments attached to tractor tyres or other machinery. 
 
If you suspect alligator weed is present in your orchard, contact a biosecurity officer at your local regional council.  Opotiki growers should contact Sam Stephens, Land Management Officer—Biosecurity, phone 0800 884 880.
 
Click here for a fact sheet about alligator weed.
Protocols & Movement Controls
5 May 2016
More nursery options for sourcing certified plants
5 May 2016
The kiwifruit industry now has two new nursery options to choose from when purchasing certified plants under the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS).   Niwa Nursery, located in...
More nursery options for sourcing certified plants
5 May 2016
The kiwifruit industry now has two new nursery options to choose from when purchasing certified plants under the Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS).
 
Niwa Nursery, located in Whakatane, and Nga Rakau Nursery in North West Auckland, have recently joined the KPCS and are now selling KPCS-certified plants. Nga Rakau nursery sells only the smaller ‘grow-on-line’ plants which are too small to be planted out directly and are usually purchased by other nurseries to grow on. Niwa Nursery sells field grown Bruno rootstock ready for planting.
 
By joining the KPCS, these nurseries demonstrate they are managing biosecurity risks, have been independently audited, visually inspected for target organisms and returned a non-detected result for a very comprehensive testing regime for Psa-V.
 
Eight nurseries have now joined the KPCS and are supplying certified plants and two others are in the final stages of becoming part of the Scheme. Click here for a list of nurseries and their status.
 
Please be reminded that on 1 October 2016 the KPCS will be fully implemented. This means only KPCS certified kiwifruit plants may be bought or sold after this date. However, growers will still be able to produce up to 1000 kiwifruit plants for movement between their own properties within the same Psa-V region.
 
Growers should be ordering kiwifruit plants well in advance (at least one year) to enable nurseries to anticipate demand. Click here for a grower fact sheet on the KPCS.
Biosecurity News
5 May 2016
Kiwifruit industry to sign Operational Agreement for fruit flies
5 May 2016
Next week Kiwifruit Vine Health is expected to sign the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies on behalf of New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry.   This will be the first such agreement...
Kiwifruit industry to sign Operational Agreement for fruit flies
5 May 2016
Next week Kiwifruit Vine Health is expected to sign the Operational Agreement (OA) for fruit flies on behalf of New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry.
 
This will be the first such agreement under the Government Industry Agreements (GIA) partnership and will help to further reduce the impacts of fruit flies to our horticulture sectors.
 
KVH Chief Executive Barry O’Neil explains the benefits of the OA for fruit flies.
 
“Signing the Operational Agreement is a significant milestone that will see GIA Deed signatories working together to help reduce the impacts of fruit fly.
 
“Essentially, the OA sets out the operational requirements for readiness and response activities for the four economically significant species of fruit flies (Queensland Fruit Fly, Mediterranean Fruit Fly, Oriental Fruit Fly and Melon Fruit Fly) and cost-sharing arrangements between Government and affected industries.
 
“Under the OA, KVH and other parties will agree a work plan to improve readiness and response, including reducing costs without reducing effectiveness.
 
“Being the first agreement of its type, it will set the platform for future OAs to be developed for other pests and diseases that can harm our horticultural industries.
 
“Fruit flies are the biggest biosecurity risk to the kiwifruit industry, in terms of both production and market access impacts. We’ve learnt that working together with Government and other affected industries provides a far better outcome during readiness and response activities. Signing the OA ensures joint decision-making and clarifies roles and responsibilities so all parties benefit.”
Grower News
21 April 2016
Protecting orchards after harvest
21 April 2016
Immediately following harvest, growers should be getting copper spray programmes underway to help prevent Psa entering their vines through harvest wounds and leaf scars. Incorporation of Actigard...
Protecting orchards after harvest
21 April 2016

Immediately following harvest, growers should be getting copper spray programmes underway to help prevent Psa entering their vines through harvest wounds and leaf scars.

Incorporation of Actigard into a post-harvest programme will reduce the likelihood of disease symptoms appearing the following spring. Actigard can be tank mixed with copper and is most effective when applied to leaves that are still in good condition. Extreme care must be taken to avoid spray drift onto unharvested blocks.

Following the discovery of copper-tolerant and streptomycin-resistant Psa developing on some orchards, a robust spray programme and cutting out infected material is particulary important through autumn and winter to reduce the spread of these new Psa strains.

Best practice advice for post-harvest protection and managing tolerance and resistance:

  • Starting after harvest, maintain a comprehensive copper programme through autum and winter including a minimum of five copper applications at full winter rates.
  • Ensure water rates are sufficient for complete canopy coverage. The addition of spreaders will improve coverage.
  • As autumn progresses, maintain copper cover to protect fresh leaf scars. This is particularly important following the use of leaf drop sprays.
  • Carry out good tool hygiene between vines during winter pruning and remove infected material from orchards.
  • Apply coppers prior and post winter pruning.

Autumn and winter are high-risk periods for Psa-V. While vines are dormant the disease can still be active and enter through pruning wounds, new grafts and frost-damaged tissue.

For more information, refer to KVH’s Psa-V Best Practice Guide at www.kvh.org.nz/seasonal_advice.

Any growers concerned they may not be achieving the expected levels of Psa control from copper applications at label rates should contact KVH on 0800 665 825 or email info@kvh.org.nz.

Grower News
21 April 2016
Protect young plants through autumn
21 April 2016
Young plants, or vines newly grafted this season should be protected through the autumn period—particularly those located in frost-prone sites or close to Psa-V affected locations. New leaf...
Protect young plants through autumn
21 April 2016

Young plants, or vines newly grafted this season should be protected through the autumn period—particularly those located in frost-prone sites or close to Psa-V affected locations.

New leaf spot symptoms are being seen on a number of sites indicating a lift in Psa-V activity as we begin to experience colder wetter weather periods.

A protective spray programme re-establishing copper cover is now high priority to protect young tissue and plants.

The KVH Psa-V Risk Model has predicted high risk periods for Psa-V over the last few weeks with these periods matching periods of rainfall.

Grower News
21 April 2016
Soil-applied Actigard - label claim lapses from May
21 April 2016
Actigard manufacturer Syngenta, will not be renewing the limited label claim on soil-applied Actigard from May 2016. Therefore, from May onwards soil-applied Actigard will be considered off-label...
Soil-applied Actigard - label claim lapses from May
21 April 2016

Actigard manufacturer Syngenta, will not be renewing the limited label claim on soil-applied Actigard from May 2016. Therefore, from May onwards soil-applied Actigard will be considered off-label use. However, it may still be approved by Zespri under Justified Approval (JA).

Foliar-applied Actigard is not affected by this change.

Please contact Sylvia Warren, Crop Protection Advisor on spraydiary@zespri.com for more information on a JA.

Biosecurity News
21 April 2016
Strengthened border biosecurity pays off over summer
21 April 2016
Record numbers of arriving passengers into NZ over the 2015/16 summer have kept border biosecurity defences busy over the season. However, strengthened biosecurity measures have stopped hitchhiking...
Strengthened border biosecurity pays off over summer
21 April 2016

Record numbers of arriving passengers into NZ over the 2015/16 summer have kept border biosecurity defences busy over the season.

However, strengthened biosecurity measures have stopped hitchhiking pests and diseases from entering New Zealand without affecting passenger processing time. In fact, processing time is down on last year, and compliance rates (the amount of times MPI correctly detects risk goods carried by passengers) are up at 99%.

Significantly, these detections included 14 fruit fly found on passengers—reflecting the biosecurity risk pressure at our borders.

Strengthened biosecurity measures include:

  • 90 new frontline officers and 24 new detector dog teams
  • Introduction of a mobile x-ray scanner to clear cruise ship passengers
  • Raising risk assessment levels
  • Heavy investment in public biosecurity awareness
  • A stricter approach with fining passengers who break the rules

Click here to read more on MPI’s website.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz