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Biosecurity News
16 November 2017
Psa symptoms ramping up
16 November 2017
KVH has received many calls from growers reporting an increase of Psa symptoms over the past two to three weeks. Many Hayward sites now report significant leaf spotting in male and female vines,...
Psa symptoms ramping up
16 November 2017

KVH has received many calls from growers reporting an increase of Psa symptoms over the past two to three weeks.

Many Hayward sites now report significant leaf spotting in male and female vines, particularly where spray programmes through autumn, winter, and spring were compromised or blocks are wind exposed or have experienced extremely wet soil conditions.

Reports of flower bud infection vary, both between and within individual blocks. Typically, wetter or wind exposed areas are more affected, with 25-30% flower bud loss estimated in some cases. Overall effect on crops will not be known until pollination is complete.  Pre-flower trunk girdles have reduced infection levels on many sites.

More Gold3 sites are also reporting leaf spotting this season. This suggests higher inoculum levels than in past years.

KVH visited some Edgecumbe sites this week and talked with growers who are still seeing active cankers along trunks and leaders in some Gold3 vines. View the photo gallery.

Recent shoot and cane collapse was also not uncommon on Psa challenged sites. Highest infection levels were in a young Gold3 block where strung canes had suffered damage during storms which occurred last autumn (images included in above photo gallery).

Here, for some plants, die-back suggested infection had entered when canes were cut to length during winter, while for others whole scions were collapsing indicating systemic infection within the plant. Scions cut back earlier in the year were starting to produce regrowth which would be restrung this season. Plants put under stress through silting relating to floods were also reporting higher Psa impacts.

In more mature blocks odd canes and shoots were being seen. Often these were associated with older leader cankers some of which showed recent exudate.

Growers are telling KVH that the ability to complete good autumn spray programmes and proactively apply a mixed range of products through early spring has been key to better results. Applying wound protectants to all winter pruning cuts on Gold vines, including all cane ends in younger blocks, was very necessary. KVH is pleased to hear and see that tool hygiene and infection removal was also considered by growers to be necessary “business as usual”.

Overall, the approach of growers is to keep moving through the workload and look forward to warmer temperatures.  

Any new or unusual symptoms should continue to be reported to KVH.

Biosecurity News
2 November 2017
Hunting BMSB in Chile
2 November 2017
KVH was part of a group that recently visited Chile to assist in the response against the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) which was detected in Santiago earlier this year. The trip was part of...
Hunting BMSB in Chile
2 November 2017

KVH was part of a group that recently visited Chile to assist in the response against the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) which was detected in Santiago earlier this year.

The trip was part of New Zealand’s joint readiness efforts for BMSB under Government Industry Agreement (GIA), and included representatives from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), NZ Winegrowers, HortNZ and Plant & Food Research. The group met with Servicio Agricola y Ganadero (SAG, the Chilean equivalent to MPI), growers, scientists and industry representatives to discuss the current situation and the threat that BMSB poses to both Chile and New Zealand.

The trip objectives were to better understand BMSB’s distribution in Chile, which information suggests is confined to a relatively small urban area of Santiago, and to test and refine our own response strategies in a real response to an urban post-border detection.

One of the most significant challenges with trying to eradicate BMSB has been the difficulty in detecting the pest when it is present in only small numbers, which is when the window for eradication may exist. MPI has been funding research in the US to develop more sensitive trap technology and overcome this hurdle. The group took 50 of the latest BMSB traps and lures and working with Chilean authorities, established a grid of traps surrounding the area where BMSB have been detected in Santiago.

These traps use a pheromone and chemical synergist to draw BMSB into the immediate area of the lure, trapping them on sticky plastic cards. The lure lasts for 12 weeks and the traps need to be monitored regularly. The delegation conducted the initial check of the traps just prior to leaving Chile. While no BMSB were seen or caught in these traps while the group was in Chile, SAG will continue monitoring and will share data which will provide valuable insight into our own surveillance efforts.

Hosted by Carlos Cruzat of the Comité del Kiwi, the group also visited kiwifruit orchards and a research institution south of Santiago to better understand these operations and establish relationships should BMSB establish and manage to spread to horticultural regions in the future.

One of the key messages for both parties was the effectiveness of New Zealand’s new approach to biosecurity with government and industry working collaboratively under GIA, which commits all parties to come together to improve readiness for future biosecurity events, and jointly respond to future outbreaks.

Under GIA, operational agreements establish the details for readiness and response activities, including the roles and responsibilities of all parties before, during, and after a response, as well as cost-sharing detail.

This was reflected in the composition of the group with representatives from science, industry and government all able to offer different knowledge and perspectives on readiness activities, and able to demonstrate what these activities have achieved for New Zealand’s readiness to date, especially as we do not have the pest yet.

KVH’s activities to ensure we are all prepared for BMSB, if it were to arrive and establish here, include running regular simulation exercises, hosting workshops, and developing joint workplans for how we would manage an incursion and long-term response. View the BMSB Kiwifruit Response Plan (A) for information about how the industry is ready for a New Zealand incursion on the KVH website. You can also read the BMSB Kiwifruit Management Plan (B) online for information about long term management considerations.

Biosecurity News
2 November 2017
Working with the new Minister for Biosecurity
2 November 2017
The Hon Damien O’Connor has been appointed the Minister for Biosecurity in the new Labour-led coalition Government and KVH looks forward to working positively with both the new Minister and his...
Working with the new Minister for Biosecurity
2 November 2017

The Hon Damien O’Connor has been appointed the Minister for Biosecurity in the new Labour-led coalition Government and KVH looks forward to working positively with both the new Minister and his biosecurity staff.

KVH has always worked collaboratively with government and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on identifying biosecurity risks to the kiwifruit industry and ensuring measures are in place to keep them out; and the delivery of cost-effective biosecurity response operations as part of the Government Industry Agreement. We will continue to have a close relationship so that we can carry on our work influencing policy setting and decision making that has an impact on the kiwifruit industry.

While it’s early days yet, the coalition has announced several priorities to progress that we, as an industry, need to be aware of:

•    An increase to biosecurity resourcing and a Select Committee Enquiry into biosecurity.
•    Increase support for National Science Challenges, including for piloting alternatives to 1080 and countering myrtle rust and kauri dieback.
•    Commissioning a feasibility study on the options for moving the Ports of Auckland, including giving Northport serious consideration.

The new Government has a very clear goal of establishing a strategy and vision for our primary sector that ensures we have one of the most sustainable, productive and profitable sectors in the world.  KVH believes this aligns well with our strategy to ensure a resilient kiwifruit industry that is protected from biosecurity threats.
 

Company Notices
2 November 2017
New KVH Board Director
2 November 2017
Dr Sonia Whiteman has been appointed the Kiwifruit Supply Group (KSG) Director Representative on the KVH Board. Sonia has been an Associate Director on the KVH Board since January 2017 and Murray...
New KVH Board Director
2 November 2017

Dr Sonia Whiteman has been appointed the Kiwifruit Supply Group (KSG) Director Representative on the KVH Board.

Sonia has been an Associate Director on the KVH Board since January 2017 and Murray Gough from KSG said her new appointment reflects her efforts over the last 10 months.

“Suppliers to Zespri, through KSG, have had a director on the Board of KVH since its inception. When the incumbent, Alister Hawkey, resigned Sonia was nominated to take his place. The change in focus at KVH, directed toward biosecurity issues, meant that KSG needed to identify a candidate who was both passionate and well versed in the subject.”

“In our view, Sonia fits the bill perfectly and we are very pleased that she has agreed to take up the Supplier seat on the KVH board.”

KVH Board Chairman Adrian Gault also welcomed the news, particularly as Sonia has demonstrated her expertise during recent biosecurity readiness planning undertaken by KVH for the industry.

“Biosecurity is a subject Sonia has been closely involved in for many years, having been in technical roles supporting growers during two big incursions – the 2006 tomato/potato psyllid incursion, followed by Psa in 2010. KVH has recently lead various workshops and scenario planning for high-risk pests and Sonia’s input to these has been invaluable. Sonia also has a good understanding of the importance of grower and wider industry awareness of biosecurity threats, a priority for KVH and the Board.”

“The KVH Board have enjoyed working with Sonia this year and we look forward to our close working relationship continuing.”

Biosecurity News
2 November 2017
What we've been doing to keep BMSB out
2 November 2017
A new KVH Risk Update on Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is available online. The update outlines how BMSB risk is being mitigated at the border, through readiness activities, and awareness...
What we've been doing to keep BMSB out
2 November 2017

A new KVH Risk Update on Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is available online. The update outlines how BMSB risk is being mitigated at the border, through readiness activities, and awareness campaigns.

The 2016/17 high-risk season national communications campaign is well underway by MPI, KVH and other industry groups. The aim of the campaign is to lift public awareness around the damaging impacts of BMSB and increase the likelihood of early detection through more people knowing what to lookout for and reporting any suspect finds.

There are some great statistics about the impacts our communications and advertising are having. New activities and data for the last few weeks:

• KVH has contacted all backpackers that host seasonal workers to make sure they are aware of the risk posed by BMSB, and visited local Tauranga backpackers,
• the KVH One News story that aired at the end of August prompted the most calls (15) to the MPI 0800 pest and disease hotline, with web ads the next (10) biggest prompt,
• BMSB information has been distributed to over 160 garden retailers through NZPPI,
• there have been over 5,000 visits to stink bug online information pages,
• MetService ads have prompted the most visits (1,477) to websites with Facebook advertising the next (1,340) most successful.

 

Company Notices
2 November 2017
Meet the team - introducing Barry O'Neil
2 November 2017
Barry is the current Chief Executive of KVH and a biosecurity operational specialist. He is a Te Puke High School old boy who bought his first orchard at Whakamaramara in 1984 and grew kiwifruit...
Meet the team - introducing Barry O'Neil
2 November 2017

Barry is the current Chief Executive of KVH and a biosecurity operational specialist.

He is a Te Puke High School old boy who bought his first orchard at Whakamaramara in 1984 and grew kiwifruit and avocadoes. His career mainly as a government veterinarian at MAF was based in Wellington but he returned to the region in 2012 when he took on the lead role at KVH and when he isn’t in the office finds himself on his six-hectare kiwifruit orchard in Katikati.

Barry led the then Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry’s emergency response efforts into a number of incursions including Rabbit Calicivirus disease, the Waiheke Island Foot and Mouth disease hoax, along with the initial work for Psa.

Alongside his role at KVH, Barry also sits on four Boards in governance roles, the National Science Challenge “Our Biological Heritage”; The Bio-Protection Research Centre; Horticulture New Zealand; and Scion. This he says reflects the recognition placed by industry leaders on biosecurity risk and the importance of science to contribute answers to our biosecurity challenges.

Barry has announced he will be stepping down from his current role at KVH in March 2018. Before then one of the main priorities for KVH is managing the high-risk summer season for some of kiwifruit’s most unwanted pests, particularly fruit flies and stink bugs.
 

Biosecurity News
2 November 2017
Biosecurity Week celebrating excellence at the Port of Tauranga
2 November 2017
As the kiwifruit industry knows, pests and diseases from offshore can cause serious harm to New Zealand's unique environment and primary industries; and the Port of Tauranga is one of many potential...
Biosecurity Week celebrating excellence at the Port of Tauranga
2 November 2017

As the kiwifruit industry knows, pests and diseases from offshore can cause serious harm to New Zealand's unique environment and primary industries; and the Port of Tauranga is one of many potential gateways.

Biosecurity Week started Monday and activities highlight the importance of biosecurity and the role that everyone in the Bay of Plenty can play in managing unwanted biosecurity risks.

The week is part of the biosecurity excellence partnership between Port of Tauranga, the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), KVH, NZ Avocado, Dairy NZ, Forestry Owners Association, NZ Customs and Bay of Plenty Regional Council.

The award-winning partnership aims to build a port community committed to biosecurity excellence, with an ambitious goal of no biosecurity incursions coming through the Port of Tauranga. It is a successful regional example of MPI, local industries and regional government, partnering to build a biosecurity team of 4.7 million New Zealanders.

It also benefits from strong engagement with the science community, including a formal partnership with the New Zealand’s Biological Heritage national science challenge and the B3 (Better Border Biosecurity) science collaboration. This has been boosted by a $1.95 million co-funded research project with B3 to trial new tools and technologies in the port environment, monitor biosecurity awareness amongst the local community, and measure the impacts of changes on biosecurity risk.

During the week KVH and initiative partners are talking to people who work on and around the Port about biosecurity and the fact it’s an important issue that affects everyone.

Port staff, transitional facilities, associated industries (such as transporters and other logistical operators), and biosecurity experts are meeting at several events over the week to raise awareness and understanding of the importance of managing biosecurity risk.

Special guest Ruud 'The Bug Man' Kleinpaste will also be attending several Port and school group presentations over the next few days to discuss the vital role of everyone who works and lives in and around the Port and local community in keeping unwanted pests and diseases out of New Zealand.

Port of Tauranga Chief Executive Mark Cairns says the week provides a good opportunity to strengthen the significance of biosecurity within the Port community because effective biosecurity awareness is critical to running a successful business and being able to continue to service the Bay of Plenty region. Frontline port staff are the ones most likely to first notice an unwanted pest on cargo, vehicles or equipment moving off the port. By knowing what to look for and reporting unfamiliar insects or suspicious looking pests they help protect everyone’s livelihood and the future of the kiwifruit, avocado and forestry sectors.

Company Notices
2 November 2017
Funding future biosecurity activities
2 November 2017
Earlier this week growers were emailed information about KVH’s proposal regarding the future funding of biosecurity readiness and response activities, in advance of more detailed discussions at...
Funding future biosecurity activities
2 November 2017

Earlier this week growers were emailed information about KVH’s proposal regarding the future funding of biosecurity readiness and response activities, in advance of more detailed discussions at November grower roadshows.

KVH has been working hard with the industry to mitigate numerous dangerous biosecurity threats to the kiwifruit industry, such as the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), fruit flies and Brazilian Wilt.

These are the most commonly known pests we’re on the lookout for but the list of unwanteds that could seriously impact on our industry if they arrive here reaches over 90, some of which have the potential to reduce OGR’s by 30-50%.

The funding mechanisms of KVH are now out of date based on the serious nature and scope of the biosecurity risks we face. They were originally established for Psa, but we now need them to be able to respond to future biosecurity events, which could involve a major eradication effort and its associated costs.

The KVH Board’s proposal to address this is to increase the maximum ceiling of the levy for biosecurity from its current 1 cent per tray to a new maximum of 5 cents per tray. The Board has given this proposal careful consideration and review to ensure it is the best way to future proof our ability to respond to future biosecurity risks.

This proposal will not increase the existing amount that growers currently pay to KVH. It is not asking growers to agree to any increase to our operating levy rate, only the ceiling level of the levy.

An increase in the ceiling of the levy will provide the necessary ability for the industry to fund a major incursion. At the time of such an event, the KVH Board (after taking advice from industry) will activate the increase to the levy - up to, but not beyond the 5 cent maximum - to pay for the kiwifruit industry’s agree cost share.

Based on the feedback we receive about the proposed levy change, we would then make a decision as to whether we formally request an increase to the Minister for Biosecurity, or not.   Please do have a read of the information that has been emailed to you. We welcome your feedback. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact KVH on 0800 665 825 or by email.

KVH will presenting more information about the proposal and discussing the potential change with members in more depth at grower roadshows in November.  View the PowerPoint that accompanies the presentations.

If you didn’t receive an email with information about the proposal you can download from the KVH website the letter and background leaflet that were sent out. Alternatively, please feel free to email us and we can send a copy to you.

KVH has also produced a set of frequently asked questions and answers to provide growers with as much up-to-date information about the proposal as possible, and to ensure this information is easily accessible to all. This document will be regularly updated.

Media Releases
31 October 2017
Biosecurity Week 2017 kicks off
31 October 2017
Pests and diseases from offshore can cause serious harm to New Zealand's unique environment and primary industries; and the Port of Tauranga is one of many potential gateways. Biosecurity Week...
Biosecurity Week 2017 kicks off
31 October 2017

Pests and diseases from offshore can cause serious harm to New Zealand's unique environment and primary industries; and the Port of Tauranga is one of many potential gateways.

Biosecurity Week activities highlight the importance of biosecurity and the role that everyone in the Bay of Plenty can play in managing unwanted biosecurity risks says Kiwifruit Vine Health Chief Executive Barry O’Neil.

“We’re looking forward to talking to people who work on and around the Port about biosecurity – it’s such an important issue and one that really does affect everyone.”

“People who own and work at local businesses remember what Psa has done to the kiwifruit industry. There are bugs and pests that we don’t want here in New Zealand because of the devastating effect they will have not only on kiwifruit, but on the whole of our horticulture industry and environment.”

“A good example is a particular type of bug we’re concerned about – it’s one of our most unwanted and called the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug. It’s a major nuisance that attacks fruit when it feeds and ruins it. It infests homes and in the USA we’ve seen it stop people from being able to sit outside their homes and have a simple BBQ”.

Port staff, transitional facilities, associated industries (such as transporters and other logistical operators), and biosecurity experts will be meeting at several events over the next six days to raise awareness and understanding of the importance of managing biosecurity risk.

Special guest Ruud 'The Bug Man' Kleinpaste will also be attending several industry and community school group presentations during the week to discuss the vital role of everyone who works and lives in and around the Port and local community in keeping unwanted pests and diseases out of New Zealand.

Throughout the week there will also be discussions with post-harvest facilities and transitional facilities to learn more about the frontline biosecurity systems they have in place.

Biosecurity Week is part of the biosecurity excellence partnership between Port of Tauranga, the Ministry for Primary Industries, Kiwifruit Vine Health, NZ Avocado, Dairy NZ, Forestry Owners Association, NZ Customs and Bay of Plenty Regional Council. 

The award-winning partnership aims to build a port community committed to biosecurity excellence, with an ambitious goal of no biosecurity incursions coming through the Port of Tauranga. It is a successful regional example of the Ministry for Primary Industries, local industries and regional government, partnering to build a biosecurity team of 4.7 million New Zealanders.  

It also benefits from strong engagement with the science community, including a formal partnership with the New Zealand’s Biological Heritage national science challenge and the B3 (Better Border Biosecurity) science collaboration. This has been boosted by a $1.95 million co-funded research project with B3 to trial new tools and technologies in the port environment, monitor biosecurity awareness amongst the local community, and measure the impacts of changes on biosecurity risk.

Port of Tauranga Chief Executive Mark Cairns said the week provides a good opportunity to strengthen the significance of biosecurity within the Port community.

“Effective biosecurity awareness is critical to us running a successful business and being able to continue to service the Bay of Plenty region. The various events we’re holding for our staff, contractors and local businesses who regularly interact with us and our facilities will give us the chance to show people what they should be looking out for and what to do if they find anything.”

“It’s an opportunity to demonstrate the good work that happens here at the Port, day in day out, to keep an eye out.”

“Our people are at the frontline – they’re the ones most likely to first notice an unwanted pest on cargo, vehicles or equipment moving off the port. By knowing what to look for and reporting unfamiliar insects or suspicious looking pests they help protect everyone’s livelihood and the future of the kiwifruit, avocado and forestry sectors.”

View the PDF of this press release as it was sent to media.

Biosecurity News
30 October 2017
Biosecurity Week
30 October 2017
Biosecurity Week 2017 kicks off Monday 30 October. Pests and diseases from offshore can cause serious harm to New Zealand's unique environment and primary industries; and the Port of Tauranga is...
Biosecurity Week
30 October 2017

Biosecurity Week 2017 kicks off Monday 30 October.

Pests and diseases from offshore can cause serious harm to New Zealand's unique environment and primary industries; and the Port of Tauranga is one of many ways in which they can enter.

Port staff, transitional facilities, associated industries (such as transporters and other logistical operators), and biosecurity experts will be meeting at several events over the next six days to raise awareness and understanding of the importance of managing biosecurity risk.

Special guest Ruud 'The Bug Man' Kleinpaste will be attending special events during the week (with Port staff, kiwifruit and avocado industry groups, and local community/education groups) to discuss the vital role everyone who works and lives in and around the Port and local community has in keeping unwanted pests and diseases out of New Zealand.

Biosecurity Week is part of the biosecurity excellence partnership between Port of Tauranga, the Ministry for Primary Industries, Kiwifruit Vine Health, NZ Avocado, Dairy NZ, Forestry Owners Association, NZ Customs and Bay of Plenty Regional Council.  The award-winning partnership aims to build a port community committed to biosecurity excellence.

 

 

 

 

Biosecurity News
30 October 2017
Biosecurity: what does it mean and why should we care?
30 October 2017
As Tauranga celebrates its annual biosecurity week local residents can reasonably ask “what is biosecurity” and “why should I care about it?”. We’ve heard recently...
Biosecurity: what does it mean and why should we care?
30 October 2017

As Tauranga celebrates its annual biosecurity week local residents can reasonably ask “what is biosecurity” and “why should I care about it?”.

We’ve heard recently about myrtle rust incursions, diseases impacting Bluff oysters on Stewart Island, and a cattle infection in Canterbury. All costing the nation, and taxpayers a lot money. Is it worth it go to such efforts to control eradications, or should we be like many other countries and not go so far?

Most New Zealanders appreciate our unique position in the world. Our animals and forests, and indeed, even most of our marine life, evolved on its own for the last 80 million years. Our productive agriculture and forestry systems depend on exotic plants, which, for the most part thrive in New Zealand free from their native pests and pathogens left behind in their homelands. As a result, both our natural systems and our primary production systems are particularly vulnerable to invasions. Our natural vegetation and very special birdlife has proven to be extremely susceptible to attack by possums, rats and stoats, and also in the case of kauri to tiny microscopic organisms known as phytophthora - the same group of organisms that has decimated native forests on the west coast of Australia and that also caused the massively destructive potato blight in Ireland in the 19th century.

New Zealand needs an effective biosecurity system to survive. Even more today than in the past as numbers of tourists arriving skyrocket, trade continues to accelerate, and high threat organisms move closer to our shores. Biosecurity is much more than just stopping bugs at the border and killing them if they do get through. It’s actually about protecting New Zealand values. Certainly, we want to prevent nasty things getting in, but biosecurity is also about managing those pests that have established and are causing serious damage, like possums, stoats, and Psa bacteria on kiwifruit.

Our biosecurity system is world class and only Australia’s comes close in providing an effective, but not foolproof, barrier to pests and pathogens that could have a huge debilitating effect on our economy and lifestyle. As well as protecting our primary industries, farming, horticulture, forestry and aquaculture from unwanted pests that want to gobble up our plants and infect our animals, it is also very much about protecting our export trade, which in the case of dairy and meat would be impacted immediately if foot and mouth were to be discovered in New Zealand. Horticultural and forestry exports could be similarly affected, simply by the detection of high-risk organisms in key primary production areas, such as the Bay of Plenty. A worst-case scenario could, for example, shut down log exports overnight should a serious notifiable pathogen be found in the region, and that would mean thousands of workers at the port and in the forest industry laid off for months while trade negotiations and research to solutions took place.

But biosecurity is also about protecting our lifestyle from pests such as the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) that, in North America where it has established in the last 20 years, has a disgusting habit of invading homes just before winter and building up huge populations of stinky bugs that no one wants to share their houses with. Huge efforts also go into preventing potentially disease carrying mosquitoes from establishing in New Zealand, especially those that can carry malaria, dengue fever, Ross River virus or zika virus.

But we also need to pay close attention to what is happening in our oceans and freshwaters. These are under threat from dozens of invading species, some of which have established and have displaced natives, and others that are getting closer every year to gaining a foothold and causing immense damage to environments that kiwis love, but know relatively little about because they are for the most part invisible. Our marine and freshwater habitats are in serious danger, and much greater biosecurity effort is needed to protect them, something we can all help with.

This column is a contribution to Biosecurity Week 2017 by Bill Dyck from the New Zealand Forest Owners Association.

Biosecurity Week is part of the biosecurity excellence partnership between Port of Tauranga, the Ministry for Primary Industries, Kiwifruit Vine Health, NZ Avocado, Dairy NZ, Forestry Owners Association, NZ Customs and Bay of Plenty Regional Council.  The award-winning partnership aims to build a port community committed to biosecurity excellence.

Biosecurity News
19 October 2017
Working with Maori to manage kiwifruit risks
19 October 2017
KVH Chairman Adrian Gault and Peter Mourits attended the Te Whanau a Apanui Growers meeting at Te Kaha last Thursday. KVH appreciated the opportunity to meet with the Maori Growers Forum and Adrian...
Working with Maori to manage kiwifruit risks
19 October 2017

KVH Chairman Adrian Gault and Peter Mourits attended the Te Whanau a Apanui Growers meeting at Te Kaha last Thursday.

KVH appreciated the opportunity to meet with the Maori Growers Forum and Adrian took the chance to provide an update on KVH’s mission and strategy, and talked about how KVH is working to prepare the industry for the next biosecurity incursion.

Peter presented an overview of major biosecurity threats, with a focus on fruit flies and the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). He outlined the impacts that the BMSB is having on kiwifruit production in Italy and the potential threat of this bug to over 300 plant species here in New Zealand. He reminded growers that not only is BMSB a risk to horticulture, but to local community gardens too.

The potential role of the Samurai Wasp as a biocontrol agent for the BMSB was discussed, along with research that has been undertaken over the last two years by Dr John Charles where he has been studying any potential impact from the wasp on New Zealand native species (if it were to be introduced). It was pleasing to report the wasp is very host specific and will not impact other species.

KVH acknowledged the support of the Maori Grower Forum and thanked them for their submission on the Samurai Wasp to the Steering Group who are preparing an application for consideration by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the introduction of the wasp in the event a BMSB population is found in New Zealand.

KVH looks forward to continuing dialogue with this forum and working collaboratively to protect Maori interests from biosecurity threats to the kiwifruit industry.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz